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Thread: What is the greatest score ever made (poll)

  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by emaples View Post
    Considering all these scores were released in a relatively small window during my formative years I volunteer that imprinting has a lot to do with my choices.

    It does, for all of us. But when I look at all those lists, I also see a severe limitation of knowledge or even curiosity. Whoever seriously lists a Hans Zimmer score as or among the "best" of ANY kind displays a complete lack of knowledge about film music history, and even of today's film music variety. And no, it's not just a matter of taste. Music is a language and music is a craft - with a vocabulary and a grammar and a "dialect". They can be analysed and judged.

  2. #202
    Grand Shriner John O.'s Avatar
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    Best Scores Ever

    1. The Thin Red Line, by Hans Zimmer;

    2. Body Heat, by John Barry;

    3. First Blood, by Jerry Goldsmith.

  3. #203
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    Star Wars
    Superman The Movie
    The Red Violin

  4. #204
    Shriner AlexShore's Avatar
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    The Lord of The Rings: The Return of the King
    Star Wars Episode IV
    Lawrence of Arabia

  5. #205
    Grand Shriner benuit's Avatar
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    It does, for all of us. But when I look at all those lists, I also see a severe limitation of knowledge or even curiosity. Whoever seriously lists a Hans Zimmer score as or among the "best" of ANY kind displays a complete lack of knowledge about film music history, and even of today's film music variety. And no, it's not just a matter of taste. Music is a language and music is a craft - with a vocabulary and a grammar and a "dialect". They can be analysed and judged.
    Sad to say but it is unfortunately true. "Opinion" and "criticism" are two words that are like to mistaken. "Opinion" is how it feels, "critique" describes the stylistic, technical and substantive aspects of a work.
    You like the music of Hans Zimmer? That's ok.
    But that's not art, but rather a cultural imposition. Hans Zimmer's trademark is it to ignore the basic conception of music, there exists no structure, no cleverness, no substance.
    I just think it's just a question of the age of the recipient. Many people simply do not know the original works or references, most by John Barry and Ennio Morricone. For example JB's "Hanover Street" and HZ's "Pearl Harbor",
    or EM's classical italo western scores with any HZ action - western stuff. Take a look, it does not hurt ...

    "The score [Inception] evokes Bernard Hermann with a modern noir sensibility and flourishes of guitar courtesy of the legendary Johnny Marr ..." HANS ZIMMER

    I feel this is almost as an insult ...

  6. #206
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    Mine is pretty generic...

    1. Star Wars (whole saga, also including Shadows of the Empire)

    2. Indiana Jones

    3. Independance Day


    Aye, I'm a sucker for scores with big fanfares...

  7. #207
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    list by fav composers

    John Williams - tie between Raiders / Empire Strikes Back / Superman
    Jerry Goldsmith - Legend / Under Fire / Russia House
    John Barry - Ipcress File / On Her Majesty's Secret Service / too many others to mention
    Elmer Bernstein - Magnificent 7 / Airplane
    Herrmann - North by Northwest / Vertigo
    James Horner - Aliens
    Hans Zimmer - Rain Man
    Danny Elfman - Batman
    Alan Silvestri - Predator / Judge Dredd
    Henry Mancini - Two For the Road
    Georges Delerue - Joe vs the Volcano
    Bill Conti - Escape to Victory / Thomas Crown Affair
    Howard Shore - Big / The Fly
    Maurice Jarre - Lawrence of Arabia / Jacob's Ladder

  8. #208
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    Jaws
    Braveheart
    Blade Runner

    ---------- Post added at 11:45 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:43 PM ----------

    That's your opinion. Hans Zimmer doesn't blow up your skirt but does to others. I'm sure some of us wouldn't agree with your choices. Don't hate on the Zimmer, dude! He's one of many musical geniuses living today.

  9. #209
    Grand Shriner benuit's Avatar
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    That's your opinion.
    That's exactly what I was trying to say. Opinion is a feeling, but criticism is a analysis.
    "What is the greatest score ever made. Music tastes changed over the course of life, quality standards do not.
    I don't hate Hans Zimmer, from time to time I hear a few of his older scores. Even if I like it is perfectly clear to me that
    none of his music even remotely belong in the list of the best scores. And that is not emotionally charged opinion, it is strictly music-theoretical analysis.

    It is not a bad thing to like this kind of music.

  10. #210
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    I like to contribute one thought. For me, one of the best "soundtracks" ever written is Tristan & Isolde by Richard Wagner. I like to think of him as one of the creators of modern cinema. He made the orchestra disappear into the pit (which was not common before) and therefore focused the attention of the audience merely to the actions on stage (like a canvas in cinema). The music happened in the background. He also was kind of the inventor of the leitmotiv-technic, which was used by pretty all the film composers since then. So in conclusion I thought, he shouldn´t be missing on this thread. Cheers

  11. #211
    Grand Shriner benuit's Avatar
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    An interesting choice ...

    ... and now i understand why. Lars von Trier's "Melancholia" ...

    I agree.

  12. #212
    Shriner EasterHay's Avatar
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    1. Star Wars - John Williams
    2. Hannibal - Hans Zimmer
    3. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre - Tobe Hooper and Wayne Bell

  13. #213
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    1) The thin red line by Hans Zimmer (far far far away)

    2) Mission by Ennio Morricone ex eaquo with Once upon a Time in America

    3) Shawshank Redemption by Thomas Newman ("Brooks was here")

  14. #214
    Grand Shriner DICEY69's Avatar
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    Well, it's misleading to draw any comparison between single CD soundtrack and whole series (i.e. LotR, Star Wars, PotC, Indiana Jones, Star Trek, etc.);
    nonetheless I vote for: Fellowship of the Ring [1]
    Indecent proposal [2]
    Portrait of a Lady [3]

  15. #215
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    My personal favourites are:

    1) Vangelis - Bladerunner
    2) John Carpenter - Escape from New York
    3) Tangerine Dream - Risky Business
    4) John Carpenter - Halloween
    5) Jerry Goldsmith - The Omen

    Art

  16. #216
    Onion Kid Rike Hatchel's Avatar
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    never posted in the forums, but I'm going to try and break the chain of "star wars" and "star treks" with what I truly believe is the greatest score ever made

    Original 1927 Score by Gottfried Huppertz for "Metropolis"

  17. #217
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    Jerry Goldsmith: Coma
    No other score gives me scares like this one.
    Second in scares comes Bruce Broughtons Narrow Margin.

    Sidenote: Search youtube for Joe Stafford Moonlight in Vermont.
    The very short Piano solo resembles Goldsmith Cape Cod track,
    it is my believe he subconciously was inspired by this.

  18. #218
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    CONAN !

  19. #219
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    Not sure if the best ever made, but problably my favorites:

    1. Star Wars -- John Williams
    2. The Mission -- Ennio Morricone
    3. Lord of the Rings -- Howard Shore
    4. North by Northwest -- Bernard Herrmann
    5. Edward Scissorhands -- Danny Elfman

    ---------- Post added at 11:52 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:52 AM ----------

    Not sure if the best ever made, but problably my favorites:

    1. Star Wars -- John Williams
    2. The Mission -- Ennio Morricone
    3. Lord of the Rings -- Howard Shore
    4. North by Northwest -- Bernard Herrmann
    5. Edward Scissorhands -- Danny Elfman

  20. #220
    Onion Kid m.tempissmith's Avatar
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    Fright Night the original movie, Fiedel score and the tunes both. 30 years later almost I'm still listening to it all the time. Ditto the Giorgio Moroder score to the remake of Cat People. The movie I like, but the score I'm totally in love with. The OST to Labyrinth, and both scores for Legend, still on the media player decades after I first heard them. All 3 Omen soundtracks were terrific, not just the first. Any early Trek movie soundtrack but particular the scores to the first and second films, the Star Wars scores, the OST to August Rush has become a major thing for me. I can see myself still listening to it in decades actually. John Barry's scores to Somewhere In Time and Chaplin. The score and songs from The Craft and I absolutely love the score to Manhunter. I have so many scores that I really still listen to years later, keep coming back to I'd have a hard time even listing them all, but most of these scores have been permanently on every media player I've owned since I bought my first walkman tape player...

  21. #221
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    I can't list these in any order (the numbering is random), and I am cheating and combining three scores into one vote since they are thematically similar, but here goes:

    1. Romeo and Julietm by Nino Rota
    2. John Williams' work on Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, with Superman the Movie, as all three bear his similar late 1970s/early 1980s style. Combine the best of all for perfection.
    3. Conan the Barbarian by Basil Poledouris

    I am a film score addict, but the above albums I actually don't listen to as frequently as others, because when I do play them I want treasure the strength, romanticism and emotional power behind each one, even separately from the films as they hold their own as beautiful standalone compositions.

  22. #222
    Grand Shriner KKSG's Avatar
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    1. Anything with the Giacchino progression (You know, that one chord progression in all his late soundtracks that cuts straight through to your heart strings and you can't quite put you're finger on why it does so much damage.(I'm looking at you, Super 8 and Lost!))

    2. Hunchback of Notre Dame (This soundtrack is the epitome of manipulation of a theme, one that can switch from a joyous anthem to a death knell in a heartbeat. (Oh, and Tom Hulce screaming for his woman in a lustful rage is one of those magic moments that got me into this sort of thing.))

    3. I can't help but fear that the constant exposure to Williams' scores is leaving them with a favorable taste in my mouth, so I'm worried that this commendation comes with a bit of bias. Regardless, since I know Star Wars has got the best chance of winning and to see it lose to a Zimmer score would piss me off immensely, I throw my last vote to the Star Wars bucket and hope for the best.

  23. #223
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    Star Trek: The Motion Picture

  24. #224
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    Jerry Goldsmith - Coma.
    I dont know anything more frigthening
    Almost on par in that regard: Bruce Broughton - Narrow Margin.

  25. #225
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    Quote Originally Posted by benuit View Post
    Music tastes changed over the course of life, quality standards do not.
    Interesting, but could you please explain how you define "quality standards"? I'm sure there could be different opinons on this too depending on ones musical knowledge and background and possible education aside from age, social background and life experience for example

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