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Thread: THE BIG ORCHESTRAL ACTION MUSIC THREAD!

  1. #2451
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    I agree. Shore had all the right intentions with what he was doing, he just doesn't have the genius to come up with themes on the level of Horner, Goldsmith, Williams, Poledouris, Herrmann, or a number of other composers who have more direct (and apparent) classical roots. It seems that every time I give the Lord of the Rings scores a listen, it's the same thing over and over again, whereas with scores like Krull and Star Wars I hear something new each and every time.

    As for the LotR scores themselves, it just seems like there are not enough notes. There's very little counterpoint, and the wall of sound (and infinite reverb) makes the orchestra sound like it has four instruments: strings, brass, choir, taiko drums (or whatever he used.)

  2. #2452
    Grand Shriner arthierr's Avatar
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    *wipe tears* At last! Some people having the same opinion as me about Shore's LOTR! At last someone NOT saying "It's AWESOMMMMME" or "the best orchestral score EVERRRR".

    I believed I was the only one judging it as heavy, unsubtle, lacking some elegance, complexity and variety - multiplying trombone blasts and timpani hits DOES NOT make good action music in itself.

    This was a dream assignment for a composer, a once in a life opportunity to create something exceptional. But Shore's score was IMO quite disappointing. Well, my points of reference for judging it was Willow, Krull and Conan (what fantasy music SHOULD be), so now wonder why my judgment is a bit severe.

    Lens: you're a man of great taste! Thank you for adding so much quality to my thread. Exceptional post.

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  3. #2453
    Amateur de roquefort Yéti's Avatar
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    I completely agree with you...
    It's so strange to finally meet people who don't worshipe the LOTR.

    Some Shore's work is pretty good (all Cronenberg so far, The Score, Panic Room...) but LOTR is just intellectual pretentious wanking. "The Two Towers" is a little bit better, maybe because the film is better, I don't know...

  4. #2454
    Obsessive Orchestral Music Maniac Doublehex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lens of Truth View Post
    Doublehex - you seriously hold Giacchino's Trek above Goldsmith's?? I wish you wouldn't state it so baldly and provocatively. Please elaborate
    Is THAT what I said? No, no, no, no! In no way, shape or form, did I ever intend for Giacchino to be over that of Goldsmith himself. I mean, come on! That's just crazy!

    I am still stunned with the works of Star Trek: The Motion Picture. It is a breathtaking score.

    Others come close - I am looking at Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country here. But once you hear the main theme, there is no turning back. It is over. Goldsmith made Star Trek music by the 4 minute line!

    And what the heck? I thought The Lord of the Rings trilogy is one of the finer examples of modern film composition in later years, alongside The Matrix Trilogy. First you guys don't like Giacchino, now Shore's Lord of the Rings? What is going on! D:

  5. #2455
    Symphonic Fantasia Sanico's Avatar
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    Lens: What a fantastic post. The Final COnflict is majestic, grandiose and undoubtly one of the best soundtracks that Goldsmith wrote in his career, and by far the best of the 3, in my opinion.
    I track that you haven't mentioned and i just adore is 'Trial Run'. It's a beautiful track with a flute accompanying the choir. Other tracks worth mentioning are 'Electric Storm' and 'The Blooding'.
    What do you think about those tracks?
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    "Music is both the cause and the effect of universal harmony" - Confucius

  6. #2456
    Grand Shriner TREKmaniacX's Avatar
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    Girl in the Red Velvet Swing / St. Valentine's Day Massacre (OST) (1955/2009 Intrada)



    World premiere of two 20th Century-Fox scores for big-city true-crime tales set during early twentieth century. GIRL IN THE RED VELVET SWING is Richard Fleischer drama with Ray Milland, Joan Collins. Leigh Harline offers sumptuous melodrama music to match. ST. VALENTINE'S DAY MASSACRE is Roger Corman gangster pic with Jason Robards Jr., George Segal. Lionel Newman offers original period-flavor swing tunes plus standards. Highlighting is brief but vivid original score by Fred Steiner, composed for stunning battery of percussion, multiple pianos, xylophone, chimes. Though still designed to evoke period, modernist Main Title, End Title offer more than passing resemblance to Jerry Goldsmith's many years later "Time Out" segment of TWILIGHT ZONE - THE MOVIE. Striking! Both scores presented in stereo from original multi-track elements vaulted at Fox. Liner notes by Julie Kirgo complete nice package! Lionel Newman conducts. Intrada Special Collection release limited to 1000 copies!
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  7. #2457
    Grand Shriner Lens of Truth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doublehex View Post
    Is THAT what I said? No, no, no, no! In no way, shape or form, did I ever intend for Giacchino to be over that of Goldsmith himself. I mean, come on! That's just crazy!
    Sorry about this – I was so smashed last night I’m surprised I could even type. I misunderstood your meaning. God, that would be crazy!! Hehe.

    And what the heck? I thought The Lord of the Rings trilogy is one of the finer examples of modern film composition in later years, alongside The Matrix Trilogy. First you guys don't like Giacchino, now Shore's Lord of the Rings? What is going on! D:
    I’m not trying to out-right rubbish Shore’s LOTR. Streich is right that he had the best of intentions and clearly put his all into its composition. It may simply be that this kind of late Romantic symphonic writing isn’t his forte. On top of this the musical characterisation seems a little tired as well – the oh-so-faux-celtic stuff for the teletub.. I mean hobbits, and the rather wooden ‘Fellowship’ theme for example. Right from the opening of the first film it rubbed me up the wrong way – the idea for the Ring itself is clearly supposed to be a Wagner ‘homage’ (Parsifal in this case), and why not, couldn’t be more appropriate; but it just repeats over and over, as if it took all his creative juice just to make one musical phrase. I also think Streich is spot on about the orchestration being too vanilla for its own good. It’s simple clichéd music that thinks it’s the greatest symphonic tone poem of all time. There’s also just a bit too much of it! But the sheer size and ambition mean its at least notable – and by all accounts, many people find it to be Great music.

    [I could go on a rant about how the films are faithful to the letter but not the spirit of the books, the amateurishness of the filmmaking - overuse of sudden camera pans in on concerned faces, unpainterly composition, graceless helicopter flyarounds (is this Dallas or Middle Earth for crying out loud!?) - but this is neither the time nor the place ]

    Shore’s work for Cronenberg as Yeti said is excellent - particularly Crash for me – not sure I’d listen to them much outside the film though. Going back to LOTR ‘Lighting of the Beacons' is very impressive, probably my fav piece in the whole trilogy.

    Thanks everyone btw for the kind comments. Sanico – I was in a rush when I typed that appreciation so I had to miss out a lot of highlights (the whole score is strong!). I can certainly understand your preference for this above the earlier two. Like I said, it’s the rawness of the first I love so much. Thank god Jerry got at least one Oscar!! To think Herrmann never did!

    ‘Trial Run’ is indeed very beautiful. Isn’t this the bit where you see a simulation of the cosmic alignment? So ethereal.. or as my tutor would say EETHER-REAL! The rendition of the main theme in ‘The Blooding’ chills me to the bone – there’s one of the basses I think that really stands out here, totally putting his heart and soul into it ‘Parted Hair’ is one of those masterfully subtle Goldsmith suspense tracks. Bits of it are reminiscent of Jerry’s scores from the 60s/70s, but I can’t put my finger on which. ‘Electric Storm’ is quite delicate for the most part, with some very precise, understated effects in the strings. It’s funny how this score exists in a very different sound-world to the previous two – the sci-fi-ish mystical aspect, and larger forces contribute to this – but earlier motifs aren’t really revisited either, perhaps only very obliquely.


    I was walking back from the bank today past the park, and it was very windy and overcast, with this score running through my head. I felt like the priest running through the storm only to meet a nasty end!

  8. #2458
    Grand Shriner TREKmaniacX's Avatar
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    God's Little Acre (OST) (Elmer Bernstein) (1958/2009 Kritzerland)



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  9. #2459
    Symphonic Lover Sirusjr's Avatar
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    Invaders from Mars - Christopher Young

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    Thanks to Restlessgypsy for this post!
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  10. #2460
    Grand Shriner Lens of Truth's Avatar
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    Thanks Sirusjr. Christopher Young is someone I need to get into more.

  11. #2461
    Is A Man tangotreats's Avatar
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    One more little treat for you all this evening - another in my "I bet you haven't heard this before!" series.

    Mike Dixon is a fairly well known English composer / orchestrator - probably best known for his arrangements for popular music and the stage.

    In 2007, he was asked to composed original music for the opening of the newly refurbished St Pancras Station in London. (It is from here that Europe-bound trains leave for the Channel Tunnel, running a direct service to Paris and Brussels.)

    He responded with the "St Pancras Suite" - performed by the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra (basically the standard Royal Philharmonic under an assumed name) and conducted by the composer.

    There are three movements but they are all grouped together in this recording:

    1st Movement (00:00 to 1:27) - "The Barlow Shed Lighting" - an overture of sorts, it begins with shimmering strings and fluttering woodwinds, and breaks out into a nostalgic, pastoral theme. It concludes with a brass flourish

    2nd Movement (1:28 to 4:43) - "The New Age Of Travel" is the score to a short film about the romance and majesty of modern train travel. It's a montage-like story about different kinds of people who travel by train.

    3rd Movement (4:44 to end) - "Cavalcade Of Trains" accompanies the live unveiling of the new rolling stock. A live announcer welcomes Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to the station and speaks a little about the line - then the new trains are driven into the station accompanied by a light show.

    All in all, it's a very powerful piece. WARNING - the third movement contains rock-ish percussion and electric guitars in accompaniment with the full symphony orchestra. It sounds magnificent, however!

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  12. #2462
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lens of Truth View Post
    Thanks Sirusjr. Christopher Young is someone I need to get into more.
    Here a impressive compilation with suites from his more important works that I posted previously. The links still work:

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    Quote Originally Posted by garcia27 View Post
    Thanks to horsewoman.

    Chris Young is a master of horror movies and more. I recommend you the suite of Hellraiser.

    For me Young is clearly an unrated composer.

    Size: 104 + 107 MB
    Forma: MP3 a 192 kbps
    Tracks: 11 + 8




    To download:

    CD1:
    Code:
    http://rapidshare.com/files/158798748/cd1horsie.rar
    CD2:
    Code:
    http://rapidshare.com/files/158806910/cd2horsie.rar
    Password: idgie

  13. #2463
    Grand Shriner TREKmaniacX's Avatar
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    Wilson (OST) (Alfred Newman) (1944/2002 SAE)



    NEAR MINT.

    The music to Darryl F. Zanuck's 1944 production of Wilson was composed by the legendary Alfred Newman and, in addition to the composer's original thematic material, includes several dozen songs from the pre-Great War period.

    The compact disc has been compiled from the original scoring sessions preserved in the Fox archive and features virtually every note of music that was recorded for the picture. Filled with rousing marches, raucous campaign songs and majestic fanfares, as well as insightful accompaniment to scenes of tension and pathos, Newman's score is highly evocative of the period in which Woodrow Wilson lived, loved and earned his place in American history as one of our most influential presidents.

    According to statements issued to the press at the time of Wilson’s original release, the musical score was as carefully plotted and researched, as was every other aspect of the film. Conducting a symphony orchestra of 125 pieces and a chorus of 80 voices, Alfred Newman, Musical Director at Fox, said at the time that the score to Wilson should be reflective of a "broad slice of American life" and "chose music to give the proper feeling to every scene."

    This historical biography of Thomas Woodrow Wilson, the 28th American president, provides a rich panoramic examination of the personal and professional life of the man who held office during World War I. It chronicles his career from president of Princeton and governor of New Jersey to his presidential election and two terms in the White House. Finally, the epic examines Wilson's staunch efforts to achieve peace through the League of Nations--efforts that failed and led to his ultimate political defeat. Even among the handful of presidents who have survived two terms of office, the events of Wilson’s life and career combine with his personal qualities to create a story of unusual dramatic power. Through accurately portraying his preacher-like oratory style and commitment to abstract ideals, along with his background as a history professor, the loss of a wife, his battles with the senate, the White House marriage, and Wilson's tragic and debilitating stroke, “WILSON” emerges with almost as much integrity as the man it portrays. Stars Alexander Knox, Charles Coburn, and Geraldine Fitzgerald. 1944

    Producer Darryl F. Zanuck remarked that "Wilson" was the film of which he was the proudest.

    SAE
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    credit to scoremanscott

  14. #2464
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    Two for the Seesaw (OST) (André Previn) (1962/2009 Kritzerland)



    TWO FOR THE SEESAW – THE CLASSIC ANDRE PREVIN SCORE MAKES ITS CD DEBUT!

    Kritzerland is proud to offer a limited edition CD – the original motion picture soundtrack from Two For The Seesaw, with music by Andre Previn. We are especially pleased that the release announcement just happens to coincide with Mr. Previn’s 80th birthday.

    A true Kritzerland Holy Grail, Two For The Seesaw is one of Previn’s most beautiful scores. The film, one of three that Previn scored in 1962 (the others were Long Day’s Journey Into Night and TheFour Horsemen Of The Apocalypse), starred Shirley MacLaine and Robert Mitchum and was adapted from the hit play by William Gibson. Robert Wise directed (fresh off his Academy Award-winning blockbuster, West Side Story).

    Previn’s score is wonderfully evocative and haunting, and features one of his most memorable themes. It perfectly captures the loneliness, yearning, and neediness of its two leading characters in one fantastic cue after another. The solo trumpet, sax, and trombone work is breathtaking, as is Previn’s writing for strings – romantic, rueful, filled with love, pain, and the whole damned thing. And then there’s the jazz element – and no one did the jazz element in film scores quite like Previn. It’s forty-four minutes of pure Previn heaven.

    The CD has been remixed from the original three-track stereo session masters and it sounds as if it were recorded yesterday, only things recorded yesterday don’t sound this good.
    This release is limited to 1000 copies only.
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    Angel on My Shoulder (OST) (Dimitri Tiomkin) (1946/2008 SAE)



    Gangster Eddie Kagel (Paul Muni) is killed by a trusted lieutenant and finds himself in Harry Redmond Jr's special-effects Hell, where Nick/The Devil (Claude Rains) sees that he is an-exact double for a judge who Nick doesn't approve of. Eddie is agreeable to having his soul transferred to the judge's body, as it will give him a chance to avenge himself on his killer. But every action taken by Eddie (as the judge) results in good rather than evil and, to Nick's dismay, the reputation and influence of the judge is enhanced, rather than impaired by Eddie. And Eddie also falls in love with the judge's fiancée, Barbara (Anne Baxter.) Even Eddie's planned revenge fails and Nick is forced to concede defeat. He returns to Hell, taking Eddie with him, after Eddie has extracted his promise that Nick will not molest the judge or Barbara in the future. 1946.
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    I'll Cry Tomorrow (OST) (Alex North) (1955/2005 FSM)



    I'll Cry Tomorrow (1955) was a first-rate "biopic" telling the story of Lillian Roth, the one-time "Broadway's youngest star" whose singing career was crushed under the weight of her alcoholism and failed relationships. By the '50s Roth had rehabilitated her reputation, and I'll Cry Tomorrow (based on her autobiography) received popular and critical acclaim in its powerful telling of her story, thanks to the careful direction of Daniel Mann and Oscar-nominated performance by Susan Hayward.

    Scoring I'll Cry Tomorrow was the composer whose use of jazz in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) had transformed film music forever: Alex North. I'll Cry Tomorrow was one of North's earlier assignments but his dramatic style was that of a seasoned master, favoring chamber-like strings and woodwinds for an intimate, melancholy effect. North's colors at first evoke Lillian's lost childhood, then become "boozy" tones for her years of alcoholism. Jazzy brass and heartfelt strings (in the Streetcar style) perform a memorable main theme to sum up the story as a whole.

    I'll Cry Tomorrow is not a musical, but does feature three musical numbers performed by Hayward (as Roth) in the film: "Sing You Sinners," "When the Red, Red Robin Comes Bob, Bob, Bobbin' Along" and "Happiness Is Just a Thing Called Joe." The songs have been remixed in stereo from the original film elements and are presented in sequence with North's score, which is also in stereo.

    Additional songs, album versions and instrumental source cues have been placed in a bonus section, to render this the definitive I'll Cry Tomorrow album. Liner notes are by Lukas Kendall.
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    Summer and Smoke (OST) (Elmer Bernstein) (1961/2004 RCA)



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    The Prince and the Pauper (Complete Score) (Erich Wolfgang Korngold) (1937/2009 TFC)



    Complete re-recording of famous 1937 Erich Wolfgang Korngold score for William Keighley version of Mark Twain novel, starring Errol Flynn, Claude Rains, Billy & Bobby Mauch. Broadly-drawn, major-key main theme by Korngold launches right off, sets vivid tone for score that follows. Korngold uses idea in all manner of guise throughout, retaining major-key harmonic scheme but altering tempo, color for variety. But other ideas abound as well! Score is unusually busy, with harp glissandi, rollicking string figures, woodwind runs galore. Brass fanfares keep 16th-century England to the fore. In spite of busy ideas, orchestrations exhibit a certain lightness of touch that roots everything in good-sprited fun! Myriad colors are perfectly captured in clean, vibrant recording made in Moscow by Alexander Volkov. William Stromberg manages considerable feat of retaining dazzling tempos of composer's 1937 original, injecting his own incredible enthusiasm and still keeping various subtle orchestral colors very much in focus. Bravissimo! Detailed notes, richly handsome packaging are icing on the cake. William Stromberg conducts Moscow Symphony Orchestra, delivers the goods with a bullseye!
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    credits go to scoremanscott

  15. #2465
    Grand Shriner arthierr's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot for your recent posts, guys! (In fact there are so much music posted here that I've stored a ton of downloads to be heard. Ha, I need more free time...).

    Actually I just finished listening to Sinfonia Tytania . Magnificient! But way too short. What a pity the composer didn't have the opportunity to develop each track into a structured 5-6 minute piece. Anyway it's a gorgeous album - the aria in track 2 almost gave me tears. As a side note, did you know the composer, HIROSHI TAKAKI, was only 33 (born in 1976)?


    Bi0: You're on a blazing row, man! Thanks a lot for these great posts, they're very appreciated.

  16. #2466
    Is A Man tangotreats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arthierr View Post
    Actually I just finished listening to Sinfonia Tytania . Magnificient! But way too short. What a pity the composer didn't have the opportunity to develop each track into a structured 5-6 minute piece. Anyway it's a gorgeous album - the aria in track 2 almost gave me tears. As a side note, did you know the composer, HIROSHI TAKAKI, was only 33 (born in 1976)?
    Amazing, isn't it? There are two more Tytania albums to come (all orchestral - it looks like they recorded absolutely BUCKET LOADS) over the next six months or so; I can't tell you how much I'm looking forward to them.

    Bi0: You're on a blazing row, man! Thanks a lot for these great posts, they're very appreciated.
    That made me chuckle... With the utmost respect to you, my friend arthierr, where I come from, the term "blazing row" means a vicious argument.

  17. #2467
    Obsessive Orchestral Music Maniac Doublehex's Avatar
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    If only we could get the tracks translated....

  18. #2468
    Grand Shriner Lens of Truth's Avatar
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    Interview with Horner on the new Blu of Wrath of Khan:
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    The interesting point for me is that he finally acknowledges that he knew Goldsmith and was invited to the scoring sessions on TMP!! Perhaps he's getting more (cautiously) honest in his old age

    The footage in the sequence of the Enterprise leaving drydock which he's so impressed by is of course mostly a cut and paste job of effects from the much maligned first film. I'm glad he mentions his Spock music too because I think it's an inspired thematic treatment of the character. Damn this score needs a rerelease!

  19. #2469
    Grand Shriner arthierr's Avatar
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    Here's the reupload and repost of streichorchester's HARDCORE BALLET, as requested.


    HARDCORE BALLET

    Thanks to streichorchester

    http://www.megaupload.com/?d=G00UA1SB




    streichorchester's notes:
    Bartok - The Miraculous Mandarin: It's not an easy listen - no standout themes or tonal center. It kind of bridges the gap between Bartok's colourful folk-like compositions and his forays into the avant-garde.

    Bartok - The Wooden Prince: Ah yes, much more thematically connected and down to earth. It's very reminiscent of Prokofievian ballet music or symphonies, which is why Horner used a bit of it in The Land Before Time.

    Borodin - Prince Igor: Folk dances and choirs and beautiful chomaticism in the themes. It's full of popular tunes, but lots of people don't actually realize they came from an opera written by a chemist in his spare time. The Polovetsian Dances make up the most spectacular segment of this opera, and can easily be considered ballet music.

    Copland - Rodeo: Speaking of popular tunes, everyone knows this one. Since Copland's music is so schizophrenic it's hard to find pieces that are through and through "action-oriented" so I went with the easy selection here you may remember from beef commercials. James Horner borrowed this sound for his score to An American Tail 2: Fievel Goes West.

    Khachaturian - Gayane: pronounced "guy-nuh". The most famous part from this is the Sabre Dance, but everyone's heard that a million times so I went with a more obscure selection. Also, you might recall Gayane's Adagio was used in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey, and subsequently Horner's score to Aliens.

    Khachaturian - Spartacus: Does Khachaturian's genius know no bounds? He's perhaps one of the most underrated composers if you look at his more unpopular works such as this two-hour ballet. While the Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia is everyone's favourite selection, for this I chose the Orgy at Crassus's Villa which was used to great effect in the movie The Hudsucker Proxy along with the Adagio.

    Khachaturian - The Valencian Widow: Another relatively unknown Khachaturian ballet that takes place during the Spanish Renaissance. It's a comedy, so it carries that patented Khachaturian snare ostinato in full force.

    Nielsen - Aladdin: The composer who will always be overshadowed by Sibelius was probably a better colourist than Sibelius as heard in his best work Aladdin. Yeah, he wrote six symphonies that people seem to like, but I can't for the life of me remember how they go even though I own all six.

    Prokofiev - Romeo and Juliet: Sergei Prokofiev, one of film scoring's godfathers, was just as good at writing ballets, if not better. His Romeo and Juliet proved he was just as good as Tchaikovsky, and earned him a spot as the 20th century's foremost ballet composer (along with Stravinsky.) James Horner steals quite a bit from this work, as heard in the selection here which can be found in the Stealing the Enterprise cue from Star Trek III: The Search for Spock.

    Prokofiev - Scythian Suite: After hearing Stravinsky's revolutionary The Rite of Spring, Prokofiev set out to do one better by writing a ballet called Ala and Lolli. He failed miserably (or so he thought) and the result is this colourful tale. James Horner used this in Battle Beyond the Stars.

    Ravel - Daphnis et Chloe: When I first heard this I was in awe of its majestic grandeur and colourful orchestrations, not to mention it was a ballet accompanied by full chorus. The themes and harmonies during the openings of both acts really stuck with me, but here I present the exciting finale as per the action-oriented nature of my selections. There are also portions of this ballet ripped off by Joel McNeely for his Shadows of the Empire faux-soundtrack.

    Shostakovich - The Golden Age: Here's a Russian composer who is actually NOT known for his ballet music, though he tried. For the most part they just seemed like extensions of his symphonies and film music, and don't carry the thematic inventiveness or pleasant listening experience of his Jazz Suites. This is only here because I'd hate to leave Shostakovich out. Go listen to his Jazz Suites and symphonies.

    Stravinsky - The Firebird: Stravinsky is mostly known for his three big ballets: The Rite of Spring, Petrouchka, and The Firebird. Of the three, The Firebird is the most "listenable" in suite form since the melodies are simple, the harmonies are simple, and the result is good ol' fashioned Tchaikovskian tradition. The more flowery sections seemed to have inspired John Williams for his score to Hook, but here I've selected the Infernal Dance heard in Fantasia 2000.

    Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring: I couldn't have made this collection of kick-ass ballet music and not included some selections from The Rite of Spring. Yeah, we all know the trivia: riots broke out at the premiere, John Williams borrows heavily from this, it scored the dinosaurs in Fantasia, etc. But did you know that Trevor Jones took a melody from this for his You Have the Power cue from Dark City? The more you know...

    Vaughan Williams - Job: Vaughan Williams is a great composer who can write some of the most beautiful pastoral music you've ever heard, but he has a dark side that can be seen in his symphonies nos 4 and 6, and this ballet. His symphonic scherzos are often reminiscent of the kind his BFF Holst wrote, but this is just weird. Cool, but weird.

    William Walton - The Quest: I think somewhere along the way Joel McNeely thought to himself "Gee, this ballet sounds a lot like Star Wars, so why don't I rip it off for Shadows of the Empire? No one will notice because who's ever heard of The Quest?" If you like Shadows of the Empire you will probably like The Quest, but if you LOVE Shadows of the Empire you'll hate The Quest for reminding you that Shadows is just a rip off of this. The selection here actually isn't any of the portions you hear in Shadows, but it's still awesome.

  20. #2470
    Grand Shriner arthierr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dannyfrench View Post
    That made me chuckle... With the utmost respect to you, my friend arthierr, where I come from, the term "blazing row" means a vicious argument.
    Whoopsie... My dictionary translated "blazing" as "embrasé" which means "flamboyant", "vivid".


    Quote Originally Posted by Lens of Truth View Post
    Interview with Horner on the new Blu of Wrath of Khan:
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    The interesting point for me is that he finally acknowledges that he knew Goldsmith and was invited to the scoring sessions on TMP!! Perhaps he's getting more (cautiously) honest in his old age

    The footage in the sequence of the Enterprise leaving drydock which he's so impressed by is of course mostly a cut and paste job of effects from the much maligned first film. I'm glad he mentions his Spock music too because I think it's an inspired thematic treatment of the character. Damn this score needs a rerelease!
    Are you trying to revive the old Goldsmith / Horner fans battle, Lens?

    Of course Horner is a renowned plagiarist who stole from many different places. This is a fact and doesn't need to be discussed further. BUT that doesn't affect the fact that he's an exceptional composer, a great melodist, with a very personal style (paradoxically!), and an impressive number of superb achievements. [Edit: I just noticed that when you talk about "cut and paste job", you mean the movie scene, not necessarily the music. So maybe you didn't aimed at Horner with this remark...]

    Great video, very interesting and pedagogic about the making of a score. That drydock scene is chilling, it's a true marvel - and not only musically.

    And while we're at it, here's the discussed score in MP3 320 and lossless:


    STAR TREK 2 - THE WRATH OF KHAN

    Thanks to Silvestri

    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]





    01. Main Title (03:03)
    02. Surprise Attack (05:08)
    03. Spock (01:13)
    04. Kirk's Explosive Reply (04:02)
    05. Khan's Pets (04:19)
    06. Enterprise Clears Moorings (03:36)
    07. Battle in the Mutara Nebula (08:05)
    08. Genesis Countdown (06:36)
    09. Epilogue/End Title (08:43)

    Total Time: 00:44:45
    Size: 221 Mb (Lossless) / 110 Mb (MP3)

  21. #2471
    Grand Shriner
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    Thanks for reposting the ballet music, artheirr. I won't have access to my collection for a week or so, so let me know if there's a way I can repay you at that time.

  22. #2472
    Equal Opportunity Curmudgeon 10Arrows's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lens of Truth View Post
    Damn this score needs a rerelease!
    Actually, what is desperately desired (by some of us) is an expanded score (without sfx). I would give up my first born for such, uh, if I had a first born.

    Which brings up an interesting point. Has there EVER been an expanded Horner score released on any of his scores?

  23. #2473
    Obsessive Orchestral Music Maniac Doublehex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10Arrows View Post
    Actually, what is desperately desired (by some of us) is an expanded score (without sfx). I would give up my first born for such, uh, if I had a first born.
    Well, considering your avatar, I am not surprised at the very least.

  24. #2474
    Symphonic Fantasia Sanico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10Arrows View Post
    Actually, what is desperately desired (by some of us) is an expanded score (without sfx). I would give up my first born for such, uh, if I had a first born.

    Which brings up an interesting point. Has there EVER been an expanded Horner score released on any of his scores?
    Krull and Aliens were expanded from a previous soundtrack release.

  25. #2475
    Puppy Lady Billie781's Avatar
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    Great soundtracks, ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much therefor.

    Ahm, i have only one track, enjoy ^^

    Elvandia Story OST

    [Hidden link. Register to see links.], composed by Norihiko Hibino, Noriyuki Iwadare

    btw, was my japanese and chinese compilation good? Or bad?
    Don't walk in front of me! I will not follow. Don't walk behind me! I will not lead you. Just walk next to me and be my friend.

    .¸.¸¤**¤.¸.¤**¤.¸..¸.¸¤**¤.¸.¤**¤.¸.
    [Hidden link. Register to see links.] ♥ ♪.¸.¸¤*
    .¸.¸¤**¤.¸.¤**¤.¸..¸.¸¤**¤.¸.¤**¤.¸.

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