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Thread: THE BIG ORCHESTRAL ACTION MUSIC THREAD!

  1. #22026
    Grand Shriner The Zipper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinphonic View Post
    A thankyou also belongs to director Takuya Igarashi (Soul Eater, Ashita no Nadja, Star Driver, Captain Earth) for working with Iwasaki to give us some pretty dope music to listen to.
    Speaking of Soul Eater, I marathoned the entire show a month ago and was surprised at how much was left off the soundtracks- most of it being the orchestral pieces. As per usual with Iwasaki's twisted attitude towards music, most of what made it on there was the electronics, and so we never got some of the best pieces on album:

    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    Something that sounds straight out of a Delius symphony and Iwasaki just casually tosses it aside like it's nothing to him.

    I's interesting that nowadays, his music is a lot more segregated than before. The Hollywood type banging percussion pieces are just that, and the orchestra usage is more classically-inspired like what we see in the recent Bungo.

  2. #22027
    Heartfelt Musicologist Vinphonic's Avatar
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    You know, I never really finished the show so that is a bit of a surprise how much was left out. Who knows if they will do an anniversary release with the complete soundtrack works, recently they started doing that a lot. If that fails you can always rip it, seems like there is not too much interference with the music this time

    I like his recent change very much, an album for those that love his electronics, an album for those who who love his classical style (he is definitely pursuing it more earnestly these days), everybody wins...
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    "Thank God for the Japanese, and thank God for whatever system that country has in place that allows symphonic music and all types of orchestral music to live and flourish, not to confine it to history as a nostalgic relic of the past, but to propagate it and to teach its power to new generations."

    _tangotreats

  3. #22028
    Just Some Guy At A Piano FrDougal9000's Avatar
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    Hey there, everyone! I hope you're all doing well! A couple of days ago, I alluded to having something to post on here, and this is it.

    Back in June, I posted a string quartet arrangement of the theme tune for Phantasy Star III, inspired by Borodin's Notturno. It was my first attempt at trying to do something for a string quartet, so there was undoubtedly a lot that could have been improved. Thankfully, streichorchester had plenty of suggestions to make in regards to both arrangement and performance notes, which I started work on almost immediately to make sure that I addressed his points to the best of my ability. I recently went back to it just to fix a couple more things, and I think I'm happy enough with it that I'm ready to post it.

    So, this is the second take on the string quintet arrangement for the Phantasy Star III theme tune (yes, I decided to split the double-stops in the 2nd violin into two separate instruments to make for a quintet instead of a quartet). I've done the best I think I was able to do with the feedback given, though it's always possible that there are improvements to be made.

    Here's the MP3 version of the track (as performed through Musescore, so there's likely still some issues that likely wouldn't occur in a real performance): [Hidden link. Register to see links.] And here's the PDF if anyone wants to have a look at the score: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]


    I'm really happy to have been able to do this, and to have learned about a few things I never knew about while trying to address streichorchester's points. Let me know what you think, and I hope you enjoy what I've been able to do. Thank you, and have a great day!

  4. #22029
    Weak Google-fu IronChefMusicGuy's Avatar
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    Hello everyone.
    Firstly, I am astounded and impressed at the thoroughness of coverage that so much passion for music can create. It's what drew me here, to make this first post.
    As my name hints at, I am very pressed to identify several pieces of anime, film, and video-game music used in the US Food Network 1999 dubbed broadcast of the Japanese show Iron Chef.
    Time and effort have revealed some, but not all, and there are always gaps to fill in knowledge.
    I have already seen a few posts within this megathread talking about a few pieces identified, but one has always eluded me.
    To cut things short: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    Any recognition at all? I have been looking and translating for the better part of six years, with no luck. Only vague connections to other composers.

    Thank you for your attention, and I look forward to being a part of this very passionate community.

  5. #22030
    Is A Man tangotreats's Avatar
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    Weird, it starts off sounding like Masashi Hamauzu, then veers off into a cheap redux of Leia's Theme from Star Wars... Apart from that, I have no idea I'm afraid...

  6. #22031
    Heartfelt Musicologist Vinphonic's Avatar
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    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    Anyway, this week Suehiro takes the lead after Inai wrote a lovely triumphant reprise of the main theme and a Matsuo-action cue: his string piece in the recent Fire Force episode is in one of my favorite keys, a very warm and delicate one, and the choral stuff is a notch above Goblin Slayer. As predicted his scores get soundtrack releases.

    Go Shiina doesn't stop his momentum either as the recent arc will reach its climax soon. I doubt much of it will be on the first soundtrack though.

    I also tuned in for the final episode of Gundam Origin on tv... those sneaky bastards (the original series will be remade eventually).


    EDIT: Speaking of Gundam, here's a little pop album, provided by King Records. You will find these tunes familiar as Sahashi gave almost all of them the symphonic treatment back in 2009, but the melodies were the reason it worked so well in the first place for a master of melody to adapt for the London Symphony Orchestra. I really have a great time with the songs reimagined as a 70/80 pop album. Takayuki Hattori also contributed with a new pop arrangement, his familiar writing is well established:

    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]



    And Tanaka's 20th anniversary One Piece score reprises a familiar tune: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    Quote Originally Posted by Kohei Tanaka
    As a culmination of 20 years, using musical ideas from the past, I wanted to make this “Pirate Expo” more exciting.

    At the same time, to fans who have loved One Piece for the last 20 years, I am grateful.

    There are around 50 pieces, and of course I made new arrangements of familiar music to fit the screen.

    That song, this song, and all the nostalgic music, I recorded the orchestra with much joy.

    There's of course “We Go” and “We Are”

    There's also "I will be a pirate king" (The first play accompaniment I composed for one piece)


    This time, the length of the final battle was long, and it was physically very hard to compose.

    To get a close sense of unity with the video, I increased the sense of volume more than ever.

    Because it ’s the 20th anniversary of the “Pirate Expo”.


    I also want to listen again, so I will go to the theater soon.

    I wonder if they can do a “cheering screening”.

    I want to listen to the great choir of “We Are”!


    Well everyone! !

    Please sing the last “We Are” together.

    A great chorus with everyone!!
    Relaeses at the end of october: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]




    More samples from Shin Sakura Taisen:

    More orchestra: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    More 90s Mecha: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    For now, a bonus cd will be released in December, but a full soundtrack release should follow, along with new media projects.
    Last edited by Vinphonic; 08-21-2019 at 10:50 AM.

  7. #22032
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    It seems I have missed this, but Hideki Sakamoto had a concert in the Music4Gamer series with the Tokyo Symphony last year. I had managed to find it on YouTube (Piano and Orchestra albums). Another side note, the same orchestra is hosting a 30th anniversary concert dedicated to Yoko Shimomura's music. New arrangements of her music spanning her whole career will be performed. I hope to finally hear some of her older works like Front Mission, Parasite Eve, and Super Mario RPG . I long for a full orchestra version of Happy Kingdom from SMRPG...

    ANYWAY, here is the link below for Bungo and the Alchemist concert.

    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    Also anyone happen to Kohei Tanaka's One Piece World Seeker soundtrack? I am just getting into his music (I know it's a little late, but rather late than never right?).
    Last edited by OrchestralGamer; 08-21-2019 at 07:46 PM.

  8. #22033
    Heartfelt Musicologist Vinphonic's Avatar
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    Ah, Josh, you've come to the right place then (as I am *a little* into his music). [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    I've also done a "starter pack" some years ago: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    One of the greats of our times.


    Anyway, since I am a bit into a nostalgic mood today, I decided to do something in a style of a certain post, when I was very much younger and a somewhat different person (though I have decided long ago to leave everything I wrote up so I can marvel at how sometimes my own thoughts and opinions can change overtime). But I digress, get ready:



    Hayato Matsuo
    HELLSING [Hell shall sing]
    The Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus



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    Major thanks to fedex1 who provided the until now pisspoor sounding Warsaw tracks in pristine quality:
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    Similar to my [Hidden link. Register to see links.] post (but a bit different as I am not so much the same person as I was FIVE years ago). This is a musical highlight and closer look at a great orchestral score found on anime soundtrack albums. Operatic in every sense of the word, this showstopper is a powerhouse orchestral score to commemorate one of fictions great characters: Dracula aka Vlad.

    There's quite a few scores (and films) around this mythos I love, namely the contributions by John Williams and Wojciech Kilar.
    But in terms of sheer spectacle this one is my go-to. Bombastic action in best fashion and tradition, Matsuo commands a dark and brooding action score with elements of opera and christian tradition.



    Hellsing is an OVA-series adaption from the manga by Kōta Hirano from the year 1997.
    A tv-series was made before the OVAs but it was not adapting the manga faithfully and is its own thing.
    The OVA series began in 2006 and was finished in 2012.
    Numerous staff members changed over the course of production but Matsuo gave it all unity.



    It is a truely ridicolous scenario: Vampires, Nazis, Fanatics, all in a Battle Royale in London. At the core its also a series about what makes a human and what makes a monster and as we know, that concept makes some great drama (& music). Especially the operatic parts, reflect that. There's quite a lot of European myth worked into it, and it all works in the musics favor.
    The first piece is a smashing mini-cantata, GRADUS VITA, about the tale of Vlad the Impaler turned Dracul. What follows is a maturly written operatic score with furious marches and bombastic leitmotif action. The motif of Gradus Vita appears quite a lot throughout the score, often very subtle. The other major motif is for the central antagonists, the Nazi Faction "MILLENIUM" which appears in full pompous force in the march "Letztes Battaillon". Overall, the Warsaw pieces are all concert-quality, the rest had to be recorded with a Japanese studio ensemble (I guess time and money). "Castle of the Red Count" particularly stands out both as a musical climax with tension and release as well as how it builds and moves. This is not great anime music, this is just great music.



    The music roughly is about a war between Fanatics and Fashists against the legendary Vampire Dracula.
    The Anime project is fairly faithful to the myth, a portrayal of the Ottoman Turks and Knights of Wallachia.
    Other historic figures like the Crusader Knights of Malta and the SS are depicted accurately.



    The highest point of the score is the action, and its great quality and full of thematic weight. "Feuerkreuz, "Marching Overture", "Conductor of the Battlefield" and "Crusaders", they all are among the best action material out there in the world of media. Especially noteworthy is the use of Xylophone which really can give your action just that tiny bit of spice you need. It channels the russian and german greats of the concert hall and the Hollywood greats like John Williams. Even Carl Maria von Weber's "Der Freischütz" appears, arranged by Matsuo, for a diegetic moment. In fact the series is full of diegetic music, the grand war scene where the main antagonist waves his arms around, air-conducting, as the Warsaw Philharmonic is in full fury, is one of those moments that make "Great Schlock". Unfortunately, as it is well known, a final cd for the last boxset was not included so some of the action had to be ripped from the source. Its an improvment over previous rips, much cleaner and you can actually can get the full piece inside your head.

    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    The greatest loss is of course the piece for full orchestra and chorus "No Man of God" which is tragicly cut short. Quite a lot of the endings recieved grand orchestral and choral pieces as well, a highlight being "Song of Demeter", the Greek Goddess, or Matsuo's very own "Funeral March". These were recorded by a studio ensemble and choir however.

    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]



    The Warsaw Philharmonic score was recorded in 2005 and another session was recorded at an unspecified date.
    It was conducted by Lukasz Borowicz & Michal Sworzynskian. Over an hour of Warsaw at its finest.



    Overall this is a score any fan of big orchestral action music should have in his collection and a testament to the landscape of creators with great skill, knowledge and taste, working together to make something that will last. A stupendous score and a highpoint of an incredibly gifted composers career. There will be a continuation of Drifters sometime in the future, so Matsuo will definitely fly to Warsaw again to record more of some of the best action music of our times. I'll leave you with the words from the man himself:

    Quote Originally Posted by Hayato Matsuo
    It’s important to use full orchestras on anime projects like these and also game productions of today. The orchestra brings such an epic scale to a piece of music and enhances the atmosphere of a game or anime scene closer to the desired specifications and if its a full symphony orchestra, magic strikes the recording.

    Today’s samplers are very advanced and are much better than before. Because of this, they are often compared to orchestras and sometimes used instead for budget reasons. However, the comparison has also enabled many to open their eyes to how a live orchestra sounds so much better and can portray a variety of emotions that samplers simply cannot. I love dark and emotional orchestral music very much, so in this regard, Hellsing was the perfect series for me. The Warsaw Philharmonic can perform all sorts of music, but they are very much suited to the dark sound for this music, hence it was a pleasure to record with them. I'm looking forward to working with them again in the future.


    And as a little bonus, my favorite bit from "Der Freischütz", performed by the Staatskapelle Dresden and Rundfunkchor Leipzig, conducted by Carlos Kleiber: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]
    Last edited by Vinphonic; 08-29-2019 at 01:54 PM.

  9. #22034
    The Real Heropon MonadoLink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinphonic View Post
    when I was very much younger and a somewhat different person (though I have decided long ago to leave everything I wrote up so I can marvel at how sometimes my own thoughts and opinions can change overtime).
    Isn't that an interesting thing to do? I too changed so much and marvel at my old posts. We've both been on here so long, a ton of nostalgia could be dug up. On that note, thanks for Symphonic Legends in 5.1, and being the #1 source for my music and providing good reads for years!
    On the post's subject, this world needs more Matsuo music. There's just not enough. It'd be great if he got a job like Miyazaki where he's tasked a new soundtrack for a huge series every year. Why does IMAGINE have so many great composers? Some specific business model, or coincidence?

  10. #22035
    Heartfelt Musicologist Vinphonic's Avatar
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    I'm really grateful for your words but I like to think of that as a collaborative effort

    Well, in the case of FMA my opinion didn't change so much in fact, other than my appreciation growing stronger over the years. Just the way I would present and would go around it would be a little different. Nowadays I know exactly what I love and why I love it, down to the tiniest detail, and vice versa. It's a long road until you can say that with confidence as an absolute I believe. I can only say listen to everything there is out there, read everything, watch everything, play everything, whatever you need for inspiration, and know what makes it tick, especially the stuff considered "classics" or "great". You might not necessarly agree with its reputation but in many cases its worth doing. It can even enhance the most guilty-pleasure you have...



    As to why IMAGINE has great composers? Because they are music professionals



    What's a music professional?

    Well, can you write a score like Hellsing when asked?

    ...

    There you have it!

    Or in a more elaborate answer: Its a company for composers who want to master composing, orchestrating, arranging - across a huge variety of styles and idioms; competent control of an instrument; experience playing in and with live musicians in multiple contexts; who have interesting life philosophy and experience; a working understanding of drama, dramatic structure; extensive familiarity with the repertoire of great pieces of music and literature; balls, talent, social skills, and an unstoppable work ethic and emotional fortitude. For starters (Mike Verta™)
    Last edited by Vinphonic; 08-23-2019 at 07:46 PM.

  11. #22036
    Is A Man tangotreats's Avatar
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    Someone has posted a genuine FLAC version of the Music4Gamer Otani concert.

    It appears to be genuine, but there's still the problem of this being one of the poorest quality recordings ever made.

    Still very much worth the upgrade though... it turns what was for me a pretty unlistenable score into something decent.

  12. #22037
    Is A Man tangotreats's Avatar
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    To make ourselves feel better after a pretty disappointing July anime season, how about something completely different?


    EUGENE ZÁDOR (bonr JENŐ ZÁDOR)
    Orchestral Music



    Budapest Symphony Orchestra MÁV
    conducted by
    Mariusz Smolij

    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    Recorded in Studios 6 and 22 of Hungarian Radio between 2010 and 2017

    Excerpts from Naxos releases 8.573274, 8.572549, 8.573529, 8.572548, and 8.573800

    You've probably never heard of Eugene Zador (1894 - 1977) - but you've heard his work, even if you didn't realise it. Born in Hungary, he emigrated to the US at the outbreak of war and was fellow Hungarian Miklos Rozsa's favoured orchestrator for some twenty years. They collaborated on on some of Rozsa's most famous scores - El Cid, Sodom and Gomorrah, King Of Kings, Ben Hur, Moonfleet, Julius Caesar, Quo Vadis, Ivanhoe, Madame Bovary, and Spellbound to name just a selection. The debate over just how much Zador influenced Rozsa rages on, as it does in all composer/orchestrator relationships, but one thing's for sure... his solo style has more than a little in common with Rozsa's. Zador descrimed himself as existing precisely between Verdi's "La Traviata" and Berg's "Lulu" - but perhaps it would be more useful to say that if you enoy vintage Rozsa (and who the hell doesn't?) you should find plenty to enjoy here.

    If you imagine Rozsa as the extrovert, communicating with grand gestures and big themes, Zador is very much the introvert... This music is a lot less "on the nose" - and Zador did not have Rozsa's sixth sense for writing instantly memorable, powerful melodies (though there are definitely some fine, sweeping melodies to be heard). Perhaps it's not as easy to enjoy as, say, Ben Hur - but this is very meaty, occasionally angular, interesting, exciting, and sumptuously orchestrated music that deserves attention.

    Naxos should be applauded for their commitment to Zador - they have released five generously filled CDs of his orchestral music since 2012, which remain to this date Zador's only commercial releases. Zador was quite prolific, and there remains much music unrecorded - so I hope this series is ongoing. For now, however, this compilation pulls together some of my favourite pieces from across the series so far, ordered to make a satisfying listen. Sound quality is unmolested from the original CDs, all of which are my own personal rips. Recording quality is a little variable, and the orchestral playing is occasionally a bit scrappy (it's still Naxos, after all) but as far as Zador goes, it's this or nothing... so I really can't recommend these bargain-price albums highly enough and if you enjoy this, I urge you to hunt down the rest of the discs in the series.

    The album kicks off with "Festival Overture" - a ten minute Rozsa-esque showpiece. "Elegie and Dance" shows Zador's quieter side; a lovely pastoral interlude. "A Children's Symphony" is pure Hollywood, beginning slow and serene and expanding out into an expansive sweeping melody and a busy farmyard scene. "Five Contrasts" is a tight and angular, but breathtaking fugue. "Fantastica Hungarica" begins with a sumptuous French Horn melody which passes to a double bass in an evocative mini-concerto for the somewhat underappreciated instrument. "Biblical Triptych" is a potrarit of Paul - a dark, brooding piece that draws to a majestic conclusion. "The Plains Of Hungary" is a portrait of the Hungarian countryside. "Dance Symphony" is peaceful but sensuous. "Variations on a Hungarian Folksong" channels Richard Strauss. "Csárdás Rhapsody" brings out absolutely everything in a thrilling rollercoaster of orchestral acrobatics, colourful melody, and classical brilliance - with a grand, larger-than-life cinematic finale that will blow the roof off.

    Enjoy!
    TT
    Last edited by tangotreats; 08-24-2019 at 04:33 PM.

  13. #22038
    Grand Shriner
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    Alright, now that Zi-O has finished its run, Zero-One is up next. Go Sakabe is its composer. It'll be interesting to hear how the music will sound for this one.

  14. #22039
    Just Some Guy At A Piano FrDougal9000's Avatar
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    I've never heard anything by Zádor before (heck, I hadn't even heard of the man until your post, Tango), so I'm gonna download that there and give it a listen while I'm working away on other things. Hopefully, I'll enjoy it!

    Actually, that reminds me of something since you mentioned how he worked with Rosza: the morning after I first listened to that Hollywood Sounds concert you posted a few weeks ago, I woke up with a theme stuck in my head that was clearly inspired by the music from that concert. I managed to record that theme by singing it out, and then managed to work on it over the next few days. I originally worked on it with an orchestra in mind, but I ended up arranging a version of it for piano since I have an easier time creating music there. Since I don't have much else to talk about at the moment, I thought I'd post what I was able to create. Thanks for indirectly inspiring this, Tango, and I hope y'all like it well enough: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

  15. #22040
    Heartfelt Musicologist Vinphonic's Avatar
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    @Tango: Speak for yourself and your untouchable taste, others got [Hidden link. Register to see links.] to enjoy

    Thank you very much for this compilation. The man who orchestrated "King of Kings" was easy to spot. I must confess there's countless of these "unfamiliar, bet you never heard this composer" orchestral albums from the 20th century with grandious, pompous introductions and walls of texts why its great... yet from the very first minute I can't connect with any of it and ultimately feel these people are just living in their own circle of academic fluff, forgotten for a reason, while Mozart and Beethoven, Wagner and Mahler still sell tickets to this day and are admired around the world.
    You will be happy to hear this one is an exception to the rule and its a lovely and passionate introduction to a vital component of Rozsa's "Music Magic". But it still proves that there is a certain something (talent/gift/genius) in a composer who can smack you from the very first note and doesn't let go of your ears until you crave for more, that Rozsa has, and which Zador lacks. Absolute confidence, strong personal style, overwhelming emtion and guts to show it to the world. From Rozsa to Sahashi, its a common trade among my favorites. Nonetheless, his music has value as only this mastery and style of music in a technical sense, contributed to the "Golden Age Hollywood Sound".

    It's less about technical mastery when it comes to music that will last in my view. That said, I can appreciate technical mastery, and here it is aplenty. (No wonder, lecturing in Vienna when it was the musical center of the world and being friends with Béla Bartók). Some wonderfully crafted music lies in there. I especially like Plains of Hungary, Variations on an Hungarian Folk Song and the Rhapsody, which feel the most personal to me.

    But above all else, its a highlight of a vital component to Rozsa's phenomenal musical gallery, and it shows that sometimes a unity between composer/orchestrator is greater than the sum of its parts. Williams/Spencer spring to mind.

    To bring it to todays music I enjoy, a good example would be Go Shiina again. With the help of very skilled professional orchestrators, his music can really soar, unlike anything he does as a solo artist.



    On another note (but related to this subject and my posts above), I found an interesting interview from Tanaka's East of Eden concert which was held last year:

    Quote Originally Posted by Kohei Tanaka
    25 years have passed since I became involved in Kabuki Den, which has the charm of games and anime, but in the meantime many new composers have appeared in the world of games and animation. How about that?

    Although it would be an anime story, Kenji Kawai first came out and I though “Oh, it's a young one with great attractions”. But then came Yoko Kanno... and her appearance stroke me with excitement.

    From that time she worked on Nobunaga's Ambition, everyone in the industry thought “This child is amazing”. I was going around the industry saying “Yoko Kanno is good, Yoko Kanno is good” (laughs).

    I was advertising to the extent that she said, “Don’t say that yet! I’ll make my debut!” (Laughs)

    Speaking of games and anime, Matsuo-kun is of course another talented composer who belongs to the office now. "His music is good", I thought when I listened to his work on the SNES.

    I contacted the distributor directly to make an inquiry. "I don't have credits, but who is doing the music", they couldn't tell me that. After that, when I examined it on my own, Sakimoto-kun (Mr. Hitoshi Sakimoto) and Matsuo-kun were working for Dr. Sugiyama-sensei. I became more interested in it, so I actually went to see him, but when I was talking, I was really headhunting, “Wouldn't you like to come in and work with me?” (Laughs)

    I think its obvious my intuition was correct. After all, talent is noticeable to the ears.

    As I always say, talent is fair. A talented person is usually seen by someone somewhere, and that person always has a good job in the end. Regardless if its music or something else.

    Is that talent still born?

    Well... It ’s difficult to answer that question. ...... Depends on the subject and the person. However, in the case of music, it can be understood by listening to it. “Oh, a little different, this person”. Recently, I'm interested in MONACA's composers. I already drank with 3 of their people. In that way, I'd like to see more talented young people who want to go to see me. Now, I'm hoping that someone who threatens me appears. Like someone who is good at both hot-blooded feelings and beautiful feelings like me. I'm talking about anime and games, but I'm looking at young composers these days, and there are many people who write beautiful music, but there are few people who can write music that feels hot.

    That's because I shake people's emotion with overwhelming music. It depends on the person of course, but for example, “ Evangelion ” (Mr. Shiro Sagisu) does not go that far. He's fashionable. “I feel like I can’t do it because it would be too similar to the work you do". He's definitely putting more rock into a piece than I do.

    Besides, Konno-kun (Yugo Kanno), who is currently in charge of “ JoJo ”, never dares to shake emotions. It suits any piece of work in my opinion. But I'm so deep into the work I do, there's only one work that fits the music I'm doing at the time.

    The world of Tanaka is eccentric, everything. The personality of the people coming out in the music is mostly biased, isn't it? The visuals are mostly unique. Have you ever seen a merchant like Torneko in Dragon Quest? That's me (lol)
    Often I think to myself while playing a lot of games, “If this game had great music, it would have improved.” You're a gamer and composer (laughs).

    25 years have passed since the release of East of Eden, and I am very happy that you still love Kabuki Den. I understand that I was able to write music that left a great impression. This time the concert was realized, and it was a very rare opportunity to play Kabuki Den songs along with various RPG works. I hope you don't forget the thrilling sensation. The work “Kabuki Den”, both Hiroi and I, was a blast of the creator's policy and soul. That's why I think it still remains in your heart. So I would like to continue to be involved in such works in the future. I would like to be involved in a work where the real policy of the creator is exploding before your eyes and everything from the art to the music just smacks you.

  16. #22041
    Is A Man tangotreats's Avatar
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    @Tango: Speak for yourself and your untouchable taste, others got plenty to enjoy
    Yes, there are tiny fragments that aren't entirely hopeless - hence me saying "pretty disappointing".

    As ever, I'm delighted that you're finding something to enjoy in the recent season; for me, it's a disappointment - no standout work, no young composer debut to knock your socks off, not even a surprise "Endro"... but the year has had a few nice surprises so I'm still open-minded - but I remain convinced that the glory days - the golden age of orchestral anime music - is in the past.

    Regarding Zador... I can't help but agree... I went in with fairly low expectations and was relieved to find not a third-rate Rozsa, but an interesting composer in his own right with something to say. Zador doesn't have the Rozsa magic... there's no escaping it... but I still find a lot of value in it.

    You mention the Spencer/Williams relationship... boy, I wish Spencer had composed more... it would be fascinating to hear what Spencer on his own sounded like, but what little career he enjoyed as a composer was pretty much over by the 1960s and even then was limited mostly to television... Something definitely shifted in Williams' style after Spencer died, but it's difficult to put your finger on what or how. Hook in 1991 was, to my knowledge, Williams' first score without Spencer and there is a different feeling, but it's not earth shattering. (Then again, Williams started working with Alexander Courage sporadically in the 1970s and after Spencer died, Courage continued until the mid 1990s, so there's a little continuity there... By around The Lost World, the Pope / Neufeld era, "new Williams" had fully taken hold.

    grandious, pompous introductions and walls of texts
    Sounds like me...
    Last edited by tangotreats; 08-25-2019 at 06:40 PM.

  17. #22042
    Heartfelt Musicologist Vinphonic's Avatar
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    Well, I definitely know a thing that's in the past when it comes to that subject, and it ain't the music

    Who knows, maybe you're right, maybe you're wrong, I made my case so sincerely and emphatically over the years, it would need a stupendous brickwall to miss my points. Yes indeed, I have plenty to enjoy and appreciate. That's just meself. I am certainly convinced we have different philosophies and tastes for the music we enjoy, and it becomes shockingly evident when even stuff you love (Orville S1, Last Jedi) leaves me completely cold after a few listens. I'm pretty sure that's vice versa.

    We're all wired differently, but its fine. I think a juxtaposition of the things each of us enjoys can make the world a more interesting place, and the more people join in, the merrier.

    Afterall, you found your place and calling and I did too

    Sounds like me...
    And myself, come to think of it... oh noooo....


    Regarding the composer/orchestrator, more example pop into my head:

    Elfman/Walker - Without Walker... Elfman was dead to me. And I believe she was a better orchestrator than composer.
    Sakimoto/Matsuo&Kameoka - Compare Romeo X Juliet to his usual game work without Matsuo or Kameoka. Its good but not special.
    Hamauzu/Hirano - FFXIII - nough said

    or my best example: Uematsu/Hamaguchi - Without this duo FF lacked a certain "magic".



    Speaking of Hirano, he actually scored a new show in october.



    He also had an overseas concert recently. I'm not expecting too much from ZOIDS but it's nice to see him return.

    EDIT: Same director as Drive Head, but everything else [Hidden link. Register to see links.] to Broken Blade, especially the synopsis ("Empire", "Republic", "Great War"). I'm still betting on the former (also am I seeing things or is that Patema.... Patema!.... PATEMA!!!). But he also directed the Uchū Senkan Yamato 2199 movie (which I like a lot, it also has numerous direct Star Trek references and is basically an animated episode) and he requested this piece from Miyagawa: [Hidden link. Register to see links.] Let's see what it will be...



    @Father: That's good, being competent at the piano and creating ideas with it is a skill you need to have, naturally. Over time you will know what instruments/sections of the orchestra will be ideal for the keys you play. Like starting the melody with clarinet, then an oboe takes over and then perhaps a horn. Rythmic motion can be celli+basses (in octaves or in unison). After a little time you have this "score building" toolbox in your head and the hard part becomes choosing the best possible option for your piece. But more important than the "sound" is the "structure" of your piece. How its constructed is far more important than how it sounds. If the structure is intact, you can hardly fail.
    Last edited by Vinphonic; 08-26-2019 at 01:03 PM.

  18. #22043
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinphonic View Post
    Speaking of Hirano, he actually scored a new show in october.

    He also had an overseas concert recently. I'm not expecting too much from ZOIDS but it's nice to see him return.
    What a coincidence! I read about Hirano concerts right now and want to wright about it too!

    In addition to other countries he also will visit Russia in 2020, and I'm so happy about it. For me it had been just a dream to hear his music live, before this news. At last the dreams comes true!
    Last edited by suro-zet; 08-26-2019 at 08:09 AM.

  19. #22044
    Heartfelt Musicologist Vinphonic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yoshihisa Hirano
    Tips on composing and creating music

    I was born in Shingu City, Wakayama Prefecture. It's really very rural, so there wasn't any place where I could get professional education about composition and the theory of classical music. So, at that time, I was in a situation where I could not learn authentic classical music as long as I stayed in the local area. I think that this background has influenced my way of life, whether self-study or anything else will open the way for me to go.

    First of all, you will be shown a screenplay, character table, storyboard, etc. at the stage of the offer. There are various genres such as human drama and suspense, but the creators have a desire to make something good. When I feel such a thing strongly, I am inspired. Whether it is an extreme story, a genre, or a story, you can resonate deeply with the enthusiast's enthusiasm or sympathize with it.

    The thing I'm trying to do at that time of work was to sleep. I try to sleep for more than 7 hours. If you are writing music intensively, your head may be awake and you may not fall asleep. If you don't do this and write too much roots, you will have to make it the next day, which is inefficient.

    You also have to wear some “self-study method”. The method is to analyze and imitate the person you are longing for. At one point, I thought, “How can I learn the Sonata Allegro style?” At that time, I counted all the measures in the American composer Samuel Barber's piano song and learned the composition. I learned from that feeling.

    I in my early 20s I was greatly influenced by Toru Takemitsu. The part that I felt sympathetic to him was that Toru Takemitsu was self-taught and a composer in the absence of academic education. I gained the courage to be a successful musician but not an academic graduate from the University of Music.

    Although I entered a good music school, there was a complex in that it was late to start a specialized music education. Toru Takemitsu was a person who dispelled it. So, I wanted to know his self-study methods and ideas. He had a reputation for being a reader, so I started imitating it and reading books. It's a result of longing for longing, or a straightforward feeling of youth (laughs)..
    Last edited by Vinphonic; 08-26-2019 at 02:29 PM.

  20. #22045
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    - Nvm

  21. #22046
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    What do you people think of Yugo Kanno's work for JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Golden Wind? I see there are at least three volumes of soundtrack released for that one.

    I was also wondering if the fine folks of this thread compiled a list of highlights and essentials like they tend to make (Most recently there was a solid compilation for Bungo Stray Dogs).

    Or even better, I am hoping for pieces in the same spirit as "Il Mare Eterno Nella Mia Anima" from one of the older entries that Taku Iwasaki scored. One of Iwasaki's best operatic pieces so far. One of my most played cues too!

  22. #22047
    Grand Shriner The Zipper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunstrider View Post
    What do you people think of Yugo Kanno's work for JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Golden Wind? I see there are at least three volumes of soundtrack released for that one.
    The best theme of any of his work on Jojo, with a climactic finale, but the brunt of the music is quite mediocre, the same zero-cohesion mess of electronics and combinations of sound that are no longer tied to genres of music but rather what Yugo has laying on his sample library while drunk. It's interesting how you brought up Iwasaki's Jojo aria- Yugo tried writing one for Golden Wind and it amounted to 30 seconds of a wailing woman... points for trying?

    Some day I should compile together Iwasaki's massive collection of arias and mini-operas, because they are unmatched in Japan. I'm getting quite tired of seasonal anime fanboys only recognizing his opera work only on Jojo (which appeals to a fanbase not far removed from that Rick and Morty) or whenever he makes his hybrids like in Gatchaman or Gurren Lagann (which they don't recognize because of the underlying quality of the music itself, but rather "kewl epic combo of opera and dubstep!!!!" to which their small minds probably associate with some garbage like Lindsay Stirling or whatever recent Sawano cesspool). The closest anyone has come to Iwasaki's quality of opera are a handful of pieces in Yuri on Ice by someone who considers Iwasaki his mentor, and the other by the [Hidden link. Register to see links.], with a Warsaw budget. And even the dramatic composition of Kanno's aria pieces are lacking when compared to the average Iwasaki one. It's as if she uses the voice as just another instrument in the orchestra rather than writing around it (most notably in pieces like "Arcadia" from Escaflowne), almost like a bad habit carried over over from her preference for choral writing.

    The most underrated of his arias remains the one he wrote for a counter-tenor on Black Cat:
    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    He did work with a counter-tenor recently on Ulysses, sadly he didn't write any full-fledged opera pieces for that.
    Last edited by The Zipper; 08-28-2019 at 04:59 AM.

  23. #22048
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    del

    del
    Last edited by ennaeus1; 08-28-2019 at 07:51 AM. Reason: del

  24. #22049
    Grand Shriner Sunstrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Zipper View Post
    The most underrated of his arias remains the one he wrote for a counter-tenor on Black Cat:
    [Hidden link. Register to see links.].
    Thanks for sharing!

    If you do end up making that compilation of Iwasaki's Arias and mini operas I'd be most appreciative. I never would have known about the above mentioned aria from JoJo if it wasn't for some of those amazing compilations that were posted here in this thread.

  25. #22050
    Heartfelt Musicologist Vinphonic's Avatar
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    Yugo is consistent... 10 minutes I really enjoy on the recent Jojo soundtracks and the rest is simply uninteresting, its not even worth listening through once. There's four cues on the last volume that are an alternate take of Psycho-Pass and I enjoy a ten minute suite of it but only Stardust Crusaders has music I enjoy more than ten minutes of. In my book Suehiro is the better choice these days and he grows his beard very quick. Grancrest War could have been such an opportunity, and there's a few moments where the old Yugo shines through, but in general, he sounds too much like everyone else out there now diddling around with sample libraries and electronic underscore and no interest in drama.
    Last edited by Vinphonic; 08-29-2019 at 01:53 PM.

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