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Thread: Classical Music

  1. #26
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    I really enjoy Chopin's work.

  2. #27
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    For me, it would be J.S. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, D. Scarlatti, Mozart, Beethoven, Berlioz, Liszt, Chopin, F. Schubert, Mendelssohn, Rimsky-Korsakov, Bruch (Violin Concerto in Gm), Satie, Debussey, Scriabin, Ravel, Stravinsky, Rachmaninoff, some Bartok, Berg, Schoenberg, Webern, Hindemith, and for contemporary composers, I'd include Pendereki, Stockhousen, John Cage, and Philip Glass.
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  3. #28
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    My favorite composers:


    1. Johann Sebastian Bach (especially the St. Matthew Passion)
    2. Franz Joseph Haydn
    3. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    4. Ludwig van Beethoven
    5. Franz Schubert
    6. Hector Berlioz
    7. Robert Schumann
    8. Felix Mendelssohn
    9. Charles Valentin Alkan
    10. Richard Wagner
    11. Franz Liszt (his late piano pieces)
    12. Johannes Brahms
    13. Antonin Dvorak
    14. Leos Janacek
    15. Peter Tchaikovsky
    16. Modest Mussorgsky
    17. Edvard Grieg
    18. Franz Berwald
    19. Edward Elgar (not everything but I do love his First Symphony and the Wand of Youth Suites)
    20. Gustav Mahler (I don't like his Seventh or Eighth Symphonies though)
    21. Richard Strauss
    22. Carl Nielsen
    23. Charles Ives
    24. Igor Stravinsky
    25. Anton von Webern
    26. Sergei Prokofiev
    27. Silvestre Revueltas (in my opinion one of the greatest composers to emerge from the American continent; superior to Copland, Chavez, Barber, Ginatera, et al)
    28. Saburo Moroi (a very great and unjustly neglected Japanese composer; his third and fourth symphonies are genius)
    29. Dmitri Shostakovich (especially the Fourth and Fifteenth Symphonies; Lady Macbeth; Third String Quartet)
    30. Malcolm Arnold
    31. Frank Zappa
    32. Steve Reich
    33. John Adams
    34. Jorge Liderman

  4. #29
    The one who is many necropedal's Avatar
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    Beethoven's Ninth is amazing as well as the 1812 Overture.

    But then again so are Chopin's Funeral March (which ironically nearly got me killed last week), Pachelbel - Cannon in D Major and the ever popular Moonlight Sonata.

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  5. #30
    Grand Shriner Lens of Truth's Avatar
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    Guys there's a great thread for classical in the Download links section. Feel free to request anything you like!

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  6. #31
    Grand Shriner Locke_FF36's Avatar
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    I've been listening to Baroque & Chopin a lot lately, Yngwie Malmsteens new album is really great too "angels of Love"
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  7. #32
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    I love classical along with other types of music and enjoy live classical at the San Diego Symphony-I have heard many composers and my wife heard Joshua Bell play once so we really love classical music and more-

  8. #33
    Grand Shriner Withope's Avatar
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    Mozart for the time being.

    Symphony No. 25 in G Minor, too damn good.
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  9. #34
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    I have a question! And I figure it would be best asked here...

    I think I'm long overdue for getting into classical music. I find I really do enjoy it, as I do orchestral music in general, but I'm pretty much a newcomer to the subject. I'd like to collect some works to put on my iPod, but the problem is that there's just so much classical music to choose from, and I'd like to keep how much I download to a minimum.

    Where do you guys think I should start? I figure it'd be best to begin with the mainstream stuff (Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, etc) but even then there's a staggering amount and I'm not downloading or purchasing all of it. All I'm asking for is some advice, suggestions or pointers.

  10. #35
    Grand Shriner Lens of Truth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heffy View Post
    I have a question! And I figure it would be best asked here...

    I think I'm long overdue for getting into classical music. I find I really do enjoy it, as I do orchestral music in general, but I'm pretty much a newcomer to the subject. I'd like to collect some works to put on my iPod, but the problem is that there's just so much classical music to choose from, and I'd like to keep how much I download to a minimum.

    Where do you guys think I should start? I figure it'd be best to begin with the mainstream stuff (Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, etc) but even then there's a staggering amount and I'm not downloading or purchasing all of it. All I'm asking for is some advice, suggestions or pointers.
    Yes, I'd begin with the biggies. It sounds obvious, but really it's the best way to get a feel for things. Even within the output of the likes of Bach, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky etc there are works that are less well known. These guys aren't 'mainstream' in an arbitrary sense or because they're 'easy' - far from it - in many cases they're the names that crop up because they made such a monumental contribution to music, changed it forever.

    Have you checked out the classical thread I linked to above?

    Here's something to start you off:
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    Also I'm going to post a compilation of Baroque music soon if that's of any use

  11. #36
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    Mozart, Bach, Vivaldi, Chopin, and some Rachmaninoff and Shostakovitch mostly.
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  12. #37
    Onion Kid
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    I'm pretty much in the same situation as Heffy. I want to get into classical music, but I have no idea where to start. I'll be sure to google/youtube some of the big names for sure. Does anyone know any pieces that are similar to "Moonlight Sonata - Beethoven"? I enjoy the really slow pace piano music the most. Don't get me wrong though, I like everything, and I'm open to everything, I just happen to prefer more slower music. Oh, and "Suiten fur Violincello Solo Nr.1 G-dur" is great as well. I just copied and pasted the title from the Evengelion Death and Rebirth OST... I believe it's by Bach though...?

    Thanks for the Beethoven compilation, Lens of Truth. I'll be sure the download them all once I create more HDD space. Can't wait to see what you got in store for us with your next compilation.

  13. #38
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    I tend to find classical music way too structured for my taste most of the time and by that I mean I am not fond of the certain laws each composer has to follow to create their piece. This is of course evident in almost all genres of music but in classical it's effect is most notable.

    Spite of that I do enjoy classical music but most of my favourites spawn from the 20th century. Wagner, Stockhausen, Fanelli and my all time favourite Debussy. I mean... Anyone can compose like Mozart but only a few can invent like Mozart.
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  14. #39
    Grand Shriner
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    Thanks, Lens! This seems like a good place to start off. Not sure I'll download all of it but the advice is much appreciated!

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaZeroEight View Post
    I'm pretty much in the same situation as Heffy. I want to get into classical music, but I have no idea where to start. I'll be sure to google/youtube some of the big names for sure. Does anyone know any pieces that are similar to "Moonlight Sonata - Beethoven"? I enjoy the really slow pace piano music the most. Don't get me wrong though, I like everything, and I'm open to everything, I just happen to prefer more slower music.
    Just paste these into Youtube. Hope this helps.

    Franz Schubert: Piano Sonata in Bb, D. 960: Second Movement
    J.S. Bach: Well-Tempered Clavier: Book 1: Prelude and Fugue in C# Minor (get a piano recording)
    J.S. Bach: Well-Tempered Clavier: Book 1: Prelude and Fugue in Eb Minor (get a piano recording)
    Domenico Scarlatti: Harpsichord Sonata in B Minor, K. 87 (Get the piano recording with Vladimir Horowitz playing)
    Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 8 "Pathetique" in C Minor: Second Movement
    Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 29 "Hammerklavier" in Bb: Third Movement
    Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 32 in C Minor: Second Movement
    Alexander Scriabin: Etude in C# Minor, Op. 2, No. 1
    Alexander Scriabin: Piano Concerto in F# Minor: Second Movement
    Frederic Chopin: Piano Sonata No. 2 "Funeral March" in Bb Minor: Third Movement
    Frederic Chopin: Nocturne No. 2 in Eb, Nocturne No. 11 in G Minor, Nocturne in C# Minor (Op. Posth.)
    Robert Schumann: Kinderszenen, Op. 15: No. 12 in E Minor - Kind Im Einschlummern (Child Falling Asleep)
    Johannes Brahms: Four Ballades, Op. 10: Ballade No. 1 in D Minor, Ballade No. 2 in D, Ballade No. 4 in B
    Johannes Brahms: Three Intermezzos, Op. 117: No. 1 in Eb, No. 2 in Bb minor, and No. 3 in C# minor
    Johannes Brahms: Four Klavierstucke, Op. 119: No. 1 In B minor, No. 2 in E minor

    And, of course, Erik Satie: 3 Gymnopedies, No. 1

  16. #41
    Onion Kid
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olde View Post
    Just paste these into Youtube. Hope this helps.

    Franz Schubert: Piano Sonata in Bb, D. 960: Second Movement
    J.S. Bach: Well-Tempered Clavier: Book 1: Prelude and Fugue in C# Minor (get a piano recording)
    J.S. Bach: Well-Tempered Clavier: Book 1: Prelude and Fugue in Eb Minor (get a piano recording)
    Domenico Scarlatti: Harpsichord Sonata in B Minor, K. 87 (Get the piano recording with Vladimir Horowitz playing)
    Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 8 "Pathetique" in C Minor: Second Movement
    Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 29 "Hammerklavier" in Bb: Third Movement
    Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 32 in C Minor: Second Movement
    Alexander Scriabin: Etude in C# Minor, Op. 2, No. 1
    Alexander Scriabin: Piano Concerto in F# Minor: Second Movement
    Frederic Chopin: Piano Sonata No. 2 "Funeral March" in Bb Minor: Third Movement
    Frederic Chopin: Nocturne No. 2 in Eb, Nocturne No. 11 in G Minor, Nocturne in C# Minor (Op. Posth.)
    Robert Schumann: Kinderszenen, Op. 15: No. 12 in E Minor - Kind Im Einschlummern (Child Falling Asleep)
    Johannes Brahms: Four Ballades, Op. 10: Ballade No. 1 in D Minor, Ballade No. 2 in D, Ballade No. 4 in B
    Johannes Brahms: Three Intermezzos, Op. 117: No. 1 in Eb, No. 2 in Bb minor, and No. 3 in C# minor
    Johannes Brahms: Four Klavierstucke, Op. 119: No. 1 In B minor, No. 2 in E minor

    And, of course, Erik Satie: 3 Gymnopedies, No. 1
    Hey, I saw this yesterday, but I haven't had a chance to listen to them. Going through them now. Thank you so much! All I can say is, "MOAR!! I WANT MOAR!"

    Also... Erik Satie: 3 Gymnopedies, No. 1 <- absolute brilliance. Thanks again.

  17. #42
    Kibo Custom Tom Toonami Tunes's Avatar
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    I like it just fine when it used well in movies and stuff but National Public Radio is a huge bore and makes me stupid lethargic.


    Quote Originally Posted by Zoran View Post
    I like mostly the composers of the baroque era.

    Johann Sebastian Bach
    Georg Friedrich Händel
    Antonio Vivaldi
    Johann Pachelbel
    Tomaso Albinoni
    Jordi Savall
    You know what they say; if it's not baroque don't fix it.


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  18. #43
    Grand Shriner jakob's Avatar
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    Seriously though, the classical thread has a lot of great things you can try.
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  19. #44
    Onion Kid
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    The basic ones: Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Handel, Haydn
    then theres Tchaikovsky, Dvorak, Liszt, Glinka, Saint-Saens, Bethoven, wagner, Schubert, Paganini, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Verdi, Lalo, Brahms, Mahler, Rachmoninoff, adn Resphighi.
    I definitely reccomend listening to Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov too

    They are all GREAT composers

  20. #45
    Kibo Custom Tom Toonami Tunes's Avatar
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    Is there any definitive performances for any of these composers?

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom's Toonami Tunes View Post
    Is there any definitive performances for any of these composers?
    I'm assuming you mean a definitive recording, right? That can mean two different things: it can mean a recording approved by the composer, or it can mean a recording so effective in its interpretation that it has become a staple to classical audiences.

    The only composer-approved recordings would be works by Rachmaninoff and later. Examples of these would be recordings of Benjamin Britten and Aaron Copland conducting his own works, and Robert Craft conducting Stravinsky's works (mind you, not Stravinsky conducting his own works because he was a terrible conductor). I believe that Rachmaninoff approved Vladimir Horowitz's playing of his piano concerti. Philip Glass plays his own music, so those are the definitive recordings. Furthermore, it would entail the composer overseeing the recording of instruments that he himself could not play, such as Pierre Laurent-Aimard's recording of Gyorgi Ligeti's piano works. Usually if a work is dedicated to a performer, then a recording by that performer is the "definitive" performance.

    However, for composers like Bach, Beethoven, etc. who died before recording was possible, an authentic recording that exactly captures the way the composer intended the piece to sound is impossible. However, there are many recordings that are better than others. But even still, listeners have their personal preferences. Something you should know is that performers often take great liberties in their playing that the composer did not intend (i.e. performances by Glenn Gould and Alfred Brendle, who sometimes have ridiculous interpretations).

    For piano music, performers like Artur Schnabel, Richard Goode, Emanuel Ax, Daniel Barenboim, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, Vladimir Horowitz, Arthur Rubinstein, William Kappel, and Evgeny Kissin almost always deliver excellent interpretations. Charles Rosen also places great importance on achieving precisely what the composer intended (he's a musicologist and theorist in addition to being a very talented pianist). I would avoid pianists like Maurizio Pollini, Alfred Brendle, and Glenn Gould because although they are technically very good, their interpretations can sometimes be quite atrocious.

    For symphonies, the outright best conductor was no doubt Wilhelm Furtwangler; his recordings are about as authentic as they get. Other outstanding conductors are Pierre Boulez, Seiji Ozawa, Arturo Toscanini, Antal Dorati, Georg Solti, Leonard Bernstein, Fritz Reiner, and Sir Neville Marriner. Some decent conductors (I find, anyway) are George Szell, Simon Rattle, Riccardo Chailly, Herbert von Karajan, and James Levine. Of course, there are many others, but this should give you a partial list of conductors who have conducted major symphonic works.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaZeroEight View Post
    Hey, I saw this yesterday, but I haven't had a chance to listen to them. Going through them now. Thank you so much! All I can say is, "MOAR!! I WANT MOAR!"
    Here are some others you might be interested in:

    Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 23 "Appassionata": Second Movement
    Schubert: Four Impromptus, Op. 90: No. 3 in Gb
    Chopin: Mazurka in A Minor, Op. 17, No. 4.
    Chopin: Waltz in A Minor, Op. 34, No. 2
    Chopin: 24 Preludes: No. 4 in E Minor, No. 6 in B Minor, No. 15 in Db, No. 20 in C Minor.
    Brahms: Sechs Klavierstucke, Op. 118: No. 2 in A, No. 5 in F, No. 6 in Eb Minor.
    Brahms: Seiben Fantasien, Op. 116: No. 2 in A minor, No. 4 in E, No. 6 in E.
    Debussy: Preludes, Book 1: Des Pas Sur la Neige, La Fille aux Cheveux De Lin, La Cathedrale Engloutie
    Ravel: Pavane pour une Enfant Defunte
    Gabriel Fauré: Nocturne No. 11 in F# Minor, Op. 104, No. 1
    Charles Ives: Piano Sonata No. 2: Movement 3 "The Alcotts" (try to get the recording of Charles Ives playing this movement)
    Arvo Part: Fur Alina

  23. #48
    Onion Kid digitalmeister's Avatar
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    My family now knows that when Dies Irae (Mozart) is blasting in my room to leave me alone for a few hours. It's great to listen to when you're ticked at the world.
    Or, alternatively, if I'm a little depressed, Moonlight Sonata can be heard.

    Pretty much, I listen to the song that catches my mood.

  24. #49
    all the composers above mentioned, plus:
    Antonín Dvořák
    Carl Orff
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  25. #50
    Disgruntled Fish Deity Chronos X's Avatar
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    I have a rather large collection of classical music myself. My favorites are Bach Sr. and Vivaldi (mostly because they're the ones I listen to the most), but I also like Handel's Water Music, Albinoni's Adagio, Barber's Adagio For Strings, and Mozart's KV 626 Requiem, as well as a handful of his other musics. Classical comprises the greater bulk of the music in my iPod, but I'm very finicky with what I like or don't like.

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