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Thread: The Official Video Game Music Rumble

  1. #3026
    dood aces4839's Avatar
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    Michiru Yamane
    my rare game soundtracks thread: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]
    my extended game music loops thread: [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    other great threads:

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  2. #3027
    ... topopoz's Avatar
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    Michiru Yamane

    Glenn Stafford
    - I think Matsuo is the better composer. But his traits and skills are not displayed at full capacity on Video Game Music. If you want Quality Matsuo Music. You should definetely check his repertoire on the Anime Soundtracks that he composed. Same as Michiru Ooshima.

    I vote Stafford mostly because his contribution to the VGM Industry is more notorious
    V for Valhalla

  3. #3028
    The dullness of fools is the whetstone of the wit. impudent urinal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arthurgolden View Post
    My votes are for Michiru Yamane and Hayato Matsuo
    Quote Originally Posted by impudent urinal View Post
    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Faustus View Post
    That's feckin wiggins.
    Quote Originally Posted by N-10_Aden View Post
    Man fuck this piece of shit.

  4. #3029
    Katachi-Makoto-Kotowari Szczepan's Avatar
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    Michiru Yamane

    Hayato Matsuo


    Very close for the second one.

  5. #3030
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    Michiru Yamane

    Glenn Stafford

  6. #3031
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    Michiru Yamane
    Beneath this mask there is more than flesh. Beneath this mask there is an idea, and ideas are bulletproof. -V

  7. #3032
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    Michiru Yamane and I guess Hayato Matsuo

    Is it just me or does Glenn Stafford look like Jorah Mormont from Game of Thrones?

  8. #3033
    Grand Shriner arthurgolden's Avatar
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    Haha. He kinda does.

    Spoiler!

    VGM [Hidden link. Register to see links.] - Currently FINAL FANTASY and GAME BOY
    VGM [Hidden link. Register to see links.]
    VGM [Hidden link. Register to see links.]
    VGM [Hidden link. Register to see links.]
    VGM [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

  9. #3034
    Grand Shriner arthurgolden's Avatar
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    Well, there was no doubt about Michiru Yamane (8-0), but Hayato Matsuo had to squeak it out (4-2) to win. Next up...


    Round 1, Fight 13 // The Composers Rumble


    Russell Brower
    [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    vs.


    Spencer Nilsen
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    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Round 1, Fight 14 // The Composers Rumble


    Manami Matsumae
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    vs.


    Bobby Prince
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    As a strange coincidence we have Russell Brower, one of Blizzardís other in-house composers, following Glenn Stafford, with musical selections from two of the same titles. There are significant differences in the two menís compositional styles, however, that allow for clear distinctions between their works. Brower is a much closer to a by-the-numbers romantic film composer, using orchestral arrangements to create structured narrative pieces and mystical location themes, as opposed to Staffordís looping atmospheres for player-controlled parts of the game. As with these selections, Brower's work is often lush and [Hidden link. Register to see links.].

    Spencer Nilsen is a bit more of an electronic composer, although his full catalog shows off his chops in other genres. He is best known for his Ecco soundtracks and for the USA version of Sonic CD, but Batman Returns is a bit of a forgotten gem, given that there were six versions of that game published on different platforms with different composers.

    Manami Matsumae is probably the best-known composer of these four (and the one with the most elaborate Facebook profile picture). Mega Man and Mega Man 2 launched her career. Despite that immense promise, though, her career never reached an equivalent high-water mark. She did work alongside Alph Lyla on an album of arrangements and took a bow on Mega Man 10 with one original composition, but why she didnít work on more projects--or more projects designed with an international release in mind--is difficult to know. She was attached to ports of several franchises that were popular at the time (like Son Son II and Adventures of Lolo) and composed for an unsuccessful sequel (Jade Cocoon 2) to a somewhat successful game. Those who know Hiroki Kikutaís career (from Secret of Mana to the Sacnoth disaster and back) might see a parallel or two there. Whatever the cause, itís unfortunate we havenít been able to hear more of her music.

    Bobby Princeís name will forever be, in popular lore, connected to one franchise: DOOM. At Doomís Gate is certainly one of the most recognizable video game themes in existence. And the [Hidden link. Register to see links.], credible or not, has probably helped further pigeonhole him to that one series. But youíre doing yourself a disservice if you donít check out the soundtrack for Duke Nukem 3D. The Saturn arrangements (meaning, simply, better samples) are particularly fun.

    My votes are for Spencer Nilsen and Bobby Prince.

  10. #3035
    ... topopoz's Avatar
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    Spencer Nilsen

    Bobby Prince

    EDIT: Regarding the Metallica Scandal, The kind of Riff's that DOOM uses are staple in Thrash and Heavy Metal. While Mouth for War was only one that was blatantly stolen. There's a million bands that uses the same kind of rymthmical structures for riffs. Specially at the end of the 80's and 90's

    Anyway

    \m/ to Doom Soundtrack. =D

  11. #3036
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    Russell Brower

    Bobby Prince

  12. #3037
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    Russell Brower was the driving force behind Wrath of the Lich King--the only really great World of Warcraft soundtrack. A game with continuous content like WoW demands ambient music that will not begin to annoy you after countless hours of gameplay, and Brower was the only Blizzard musician to successfully accomplish this and still present a distinct and memorable sound. He is to a large extent the reason why Northrend will always be my favorite zone; It has the only music in the game that really matters.

    Manami Matsumae created the Mega Man sound. Takashi Tateishi may have surpassed her, but I don't think Mega Man 2's historic score would have ever happened had Matsumae not first established the standard.


    Edit: I just listened to that "scandal" video in its entirety, and while the guy who made it was overambitious in a lot of his attributions, there were a number of obvious covers. I named "Angry Chair" immediately, and "Mouth of War" is indisputable. A number of others, like "This is Love" and "Them Bones", become obvious once you catch on to what Bobby Prince is doing here. To call it a scandal is pretty ridiculous though. If Metallica weren't lawsuit-happy pricks we'd probably be calling it a fun tribute. I think copyright law exploitation by megamonopolies over the past decade has really clouded popular judgement on the line between creative reinterpretation and intellectual theft. No one regards soundtracks that incorporate Beethoven or Chopin as "scandalous". Sure, Bobby Prince's arrangements were composed by living artists at the time, so there are legitimate grounds for dispute, but they are grey, not black and white, and they would have to follow such lines as "Pantera does not condone violence as entertainment", or "Pantera feels that sales of the Doom ost have made a negative impact on sales of Vulgar Display of Power", or "Bobby Prince has mislead the public into believing that he is the original composer of Vulgar Display of Power", or "Pantera thinks this game sucks really bad and are embarrassed to hear their music in it." Need I go on?

  13. #3038
    The dullness of fools is the whetstone of the wit. impudent urinal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shad View Post
    Russell Brower

    Manami Matsumae

  14. #3039
    Sewer Diver Smarty's Avatar
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    Shad: What's the track from WoW you're talking about? I've heard Wrath of the Lich King's soundtrack more times than I can count but I've never played it.

  15. #3040
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smarty View Post
    Shad: What's the track from WoW you're talking about? I've heard Wrath of the Lich King's soundtrack more times than I can count but I've never played it.
    Northrend is the zone encompassing Wrath of the Lich King in its entirety. I meant no single particular track.

  16. #3041
    Grand Shriner Puea's Avatar
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    Russell Brower

    Bobby Prince
    I uploaded some Stuff myself.
    But here are my requests (if anybody cares):
    Lossless rip of the Earthbound Music (from the cartridge)
    [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    Because reasons, here are my favorite composers (not what i think are the best, just my personal favourites)
    1) Hirokazu Tanaka
    2) Wally Beben
    3) Koji Kondo
    4) Michiru Yamane
    5) Rob Hubbard

  17. #3042
    Grand Shriner arthurgolden's Avatar
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    Welcome to Puea!

    @Shad: I agree with you that the growing apathy about copyright law has led to a cultural backlash in the other direction, where things falling into a gray area of homage, remix, or synthesis are being unnecessarily called out. Some of the claims against Bobby have legs; others are a stretch. But ultimately, if Vanilla Ice gets off with the "itty bitty ting" defense and Yoko Kanno still has a career, what Bobby did isn't even on the radar, much less a "scandal."

    Anwyay, looks like Russell Brower (4-2) and Bobby Prince (4-2) eked out victories. Next up...


    Round 1, Fight 15 // The Composers Rumble


    Jun Senoue
    [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

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    Junichi Masuda
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    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Round 1, Fight 16 // The Composers Rumble


    Koichi Sugiyama
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    Michael Land
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    Jun Senoue joined the Sonic series in 1994 for Sonic and Knuckles/Sonic the Hedgehog 3 and hasnít left since. At a time when guitars in video games sounded like [Hidden link. Register to see links.], he embraced new technology and added some swagger to the Blue Blur. Despite the presence of a guitar in nearly every picture of him, though, heís done fine work arranging orchestral pieces for Dark Wizard Symphony (among others) and composing outside of Sonicís world, including the soundtrack for Burning Rangers.

    Similarly, Junichi Masudaís work is often diminished to one series (Pokemon in his case). Understandably so. The franchise is one of the most lucrative in the world, which is to say thatís a lot of pressure he withstood to create memorable music, and the rewards of that effort are the nostalgia and fervor of a loving fanbase. Yet any retrospective on his career must include Pulseman, too, which is a Genesis classic.

    The ďBig Boss of Video Game MusicĒ didnít start in video games. Surprisingly, he was the director of a major broadcasting corporation, but felt in his heart he should be writing music instead. Iíll bet that was a dip in his annual income. Like Soule, he also got his start by writing a letter to a video game company (Enix in his case). From then on out, his destiny would be hitched to Dragon Quest. Incredibly, it was all the way back in 1987 that he staged his first orchestral concert of video game music, a year after releasing a CD of orchestral arrangements of Dragon Quest. Though it would take years for global popular culture to more noticeably appreciate video game music with any seriousness, Sugiyama played perhaps the most important role making people realize that the music could stand on its own.

    Legendary LucasArts composer Michael Land appeared on the scene in 1990 with The Secret of Monkey Island. Things quickly fell into place for him. He designed a MIDI sequencer and, in searching out new talent, discovered Peter McConnell and Clint Bajakian. Then he composed one of the most beautiful video game soundtracks of all time in The Dig. Not a bad start to a career. These days he is still working and is purportedly studying the cello and violin, demonstrating another key component to artistic success: never stop learning about your craft and growing as an artist.

    My votes are for Junichi Masuda and Koichi Sugiyama.

  18. #3043
    The dullness of fools is the whetstone of the wit. impudent urinal's Avatar
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    Jun Senoue

    Michael Land

  19. #3044
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    Junichi Masuda

    Koichi Sugiyama

  20. #3045
    ... topopoz's Avatar
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    Jun Senoue

    Michael Land

  21. #3046
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    Junichi Masuda I guess, but i would easily vote for Michael Land over these two...

    Koichi Sugiyama

  22. #3047
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    Junichi Masuda

    Koichi Sugiyama

  23. #3048
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    Junichi Masuda

    Koichi Sugiyama


    Darn, I missed the last round.

  24. #3049
    Grand Shriner arthurgolden's Avatar
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    As any last votes come in, here's a little something for those who are waiting for the next post: [Hidden link. Register to see links.].

  25. #3050
    Grand Shriner arthurgolden's Avatar
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    With Junichi Masuda (5-2) and Koichi Sugiyama (5-2) winning, we are now halfway through Round 1! Next up...


    Round 1, Fight 17 // The Composers Rumble


    Martin O'Donnell
    [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.]

    vs.


    Stephen Rippy
    [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.], [Hidden link. Register to see links.]


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Round 1, Fight 18 // The Composers Rumble


    Yuzo Koshiro
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    Michiko Naruke
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    For a time, Halo was a lightning rod in discussions about the state of video game music. Despite its melodic, rock-influenced, mostly straightforward approach, it was often contrasted with fans' vague notions of a golden past where video game music was better. When pressed for an explanation, I've personally witnessed many of those conversations wilt into, "Well, vgm used to be memorable," then "Well, the melodies were catchier," with the obvious underlying problem that those people were simply intimidated by orchestral arrangements because they worried they'd sound stupid talking about it. And it often seems to me that's tied to the conspicuousness of the melody. This doesn't totally explain the aversion to Halo's soundtrack, though, because Halo's melodies are pretty freakin' obvious. More so, Halo created a new culture of gamers who were shelling out enough money to grab the attention of game developers, forcing more traditional gamers to feel slighted and disclaim anything about the game, the soundtrack included. Over ten years later, the whole thing seems pretty silly, because the music has many high points, the video game culture has expanded greatly by diversifying the audience, and the nostalgia and longing those gamers felt in response to Halo has had many outlets in modern gaming, not the least of which through downloadable retro and retro-style games made available through consoles. Time has also given Martin O'Donnell a chance to show off many sides to his compositional style, which should be a clear sign that, if anyone, he will not be responsible for a dark future of bland, orchestral, mood music in video games.

    Stephen Rippy is a hard man to pin down. Just listen to Chocolate Outline and tell me what genre that song fits into. It's got Spanish-style guitars, rotary electric guitars, autoharp, synthesized tubular bells, atmospheric pings with long reverberating echos, a kalimba solo, and a rocking bassline that, if louder, would fit perfectly into a Rage against the Machine song. Do we just lump this into world music? Electronic music? Whatever you want to call it, it's awesome. And more than that, it's a nice emblem of the open borders approach video game music has long held toward genre mixing.

    In the fourth generation of video games, Yuzo Koshiro was king. ActRaiser, Streets of Rage, The Revenge of Shinobi, Beyond Oasis, Ys, Eye of the Beholder, Super Adventure Island. Putting forth tons of quality game soundtracks wasn't enough. He innovated, too, the most obvious example being the electronica soundtrack for Streets of Rage, now cited as a forerunner to today's techno, and an influence on dubstep. I remember the first time I went to my next-door neighbor's house to play Streets of Rage 2. I was blown away by the first stage music. This was 1993. I'd never heard techno before. I didn't even know how to describe it. All those dark alleys and people punching to music you could dance to. It was badass. Around the same time, [Hidden link. Register to see links.] was on the air, and I remember it seemed like the contestants always ended up playing ActRaiser, which I also thought had awesome music. Years later, I found out it was the same guy. That blew my mind.

    Long before Wild Arms, Michiko Naruke was tearing it up with Valis 3 and Psycho Dream. But, of course, Wild Arms is her masterpiece, introducing Wild West themes and gestures into the world of video game music. She wasn't the first, nor the last, but she is the best, and any time a soundtrack contains acoustic guitar and whistling it seems to be a nod at Michiko. Interestingly, Naruke is a huge fan of Jerry Goldsmith and Johann Sebastian Bach and owns an original score by Bach.

    My votes are for Stephen Rippy and Yuzo Koshiro.

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