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sorei
11-03-2010, 10:00 AM
Primeval [Promo] (the movie, NOT the TV Series)

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Composed by John Frizzell. Released in 2007.

TV movie

Track listing

01. Mass Graves
02. Peace Keeper
03. Happy Village
04. At Krieg's House
05. Krieg's Pain
06. Shaman's Blessing
07. Humping Cage
08. The Dart
09. Shaman's Head
10. Jojo Alive
11. What Happened
12. Krieg Shot
13. Lekker Fish
14. Matt Gets Killed
15. I Hate Africa
16. Mr. T vs Mr. Man
17. Beeper Speeds
18. Flying Home

Total Duration: 00:31:51 (320kb/s)

Primeval is a 2007 horror film which was released on January 12, 2007. The film was inspired by the true story of Gustave, a 1 tonne, 20 foot (6 meter) giant, man-eating crocodile in Burundi.
...more...
The film opens as a forensic anthropologist is looking over a mass grave of people who have been killed by what she claims are identical gunshot wounds. Both the woman and the UN soldier head away from the mass graves to inspect another one on the south side. She digs her shovel into what she believes is another mass grave only to be attacked by an unseen creature. The anthropologist is dragged into the water as the UN soldier opens fire. Other soldiers show up and begin shooting at the attacker as it kills the woman and heads for deeper water to consume her.
The next scene is a New York City news room. Tim (Purcell), is looking at a TV and talking on his phone, waiting to see if his name is mentioned in connection with a case that he was working on in which the evidence was falsified. His cameraman and best friend Steven is telling him maybe their boss, Roger, did not see or hear what was being broadcast on the news. Right when he says that Tim is asked to see Roger. Tim sees Roger who in turn does not want to talk about his contract just yet, but instead introduces him to a very attractive woman standing by another television set viewing a report about the woman who was seen previously with the creature. The woman's name is Aviva and she is a reporter that focuses on reports dealing with animals being killed or harmed, and she is interested in the story of Gustave, an enormous crocodile who is known to have killed hundreds of people in Africa. Tim is more-or-less "forced" into going to Africa with her and brings Steven along to help capture this creature.
In Burundi they meet Harry, who is there to warn them about "the Bush," as he calls it, and the dangerous warlord who lives there, who has nicknamed himself "Little Gustave." They meet wildlife expert Matt Collins. When they reach the village, they meet their guide, Jacob Kreig, and are blessed by the local shaman. The group gets a number of villagers to assemble the cage that will catch Gustave, and walk it to a nearby swamp. The first attempt to capture Gustave fails, but Matt manages to shoot him with a tracking dart. Steven, while getting scenic video, catches on film Little Gustave himself executing the shaman who blessed the group, along with his family.

additional info (interview with Frizzell about the Primeval score):

Despite the dreadful reviews that have accompanied the “inspired by true events,” crocodile-as-a-serial-killer flick Primeval, there is at least one bright spot in this cinematic miasma. That bright spot is the ambitious score provided by composer John Frizzell, a score that is far more impressive than the film it accompanies.

While many of today’s horror (or in this case, pseudo-horror) films tend to rely on orchestral scores which employ large doses of screeching violins and pounding percussion, Frizzell opted to include many of the sounds and instruments that are unique to the nation in which the movie is set. In the case of Primeval, this meant that Frizzell actually traveled to Africa to capture sounds and utilize instruments that would bring the film’s setting—the nation of Burundi—to life.

In fact, Frizzell enlisted some of Cape Town’s finest musicians to create a “composing library” of over 800 sound clips, which served as the inspirational source material for his score. Some of the sonic samplings from these recording sessions included the traditional Burundian musical story-telling technique Inanga Chochotee, where a soloist plays a low-pitched harp and whispers in an ominous tone. Frizell also incorporated Burundian drumming, originally used by African kings to express their power and authority.

But that’s not to say that Frizzell’s Primeval score isn’t without its more traditional moments. On the contrary, Frizzell blends the two aspects of the score seamlessly, resulting in a unique hybrid that makes the Primeval score a true rarity.

Dread Central had the opportunity to ask Frizzell (who has also scored such horror flicks as Ghost Ship, Alien: Resurrection and Stay Alive, along with such mainstream movies as Beavis and Butthead Do America and Office Space) about his unique experiences in Africa, and how they may have forever changed his approach to scoring films.

Dave Manack: Many composers would be satisfied by simply creating a “traditional” horror (or in this case, pseudo-horror) film score. You, however, elected to actually travel to Africa and utilize many of the sounds, instruments and musical techniques that are unique to that continent and to the country of Burundi, specifically. What was the main motivation for your approach on the Primeval score?

John Frizell: Director Michael Katleman and I spoke in great depth before he started shooting. We knew that the score would need a great deal of drive and intensity, but we both had a great desire to make it stand out from other scores and, in particular, scores to films set in Africa. We noticed that while many scores to African films were beautifully composed and produced, many introduce African sounds in an imitative way. Our talks led to the conclusion that to get a unique sound, we needed a unique process, and to do that, I would need to do work with masters of African music. The best way to do that was to go to Africa.

My goal was to put you into the mood of the film by using very traditional African instruments and performers. I did research on traditional African instruments, performing techniques and the structure of African music. Much traditional African music differs from European music, in that often the performer and the audience are not delineated. I have heard traditional African music described as being so completely intuitive, it is 'like breathing.' Capturing this idea and blending it with filmmaking proved quite a challenge, but I think our goal was achieved and serves to put the audience in a unique place.

DM: Is this the first time you’ve traveled to a different country to utilize their specific musical sounds, instruments and techniques? If not, when have you done it before? If so, will you do it again?

JF: Yes! This is my first time. It is definitely a priority for me to do more projects this way.

DM: Burundi is located in a tragically war-torn region. What can you tell us about your experiences in Africa and what you may have taken away from your experience there?

JF: It was very moving getting to know the Cape Town Burundian drummers. These guys had escaped the atrocities that spilled over into Burundi from Rwanda and had traveled on foot, all the way to Cape Town. That is several thousand miles. The trip had taken several years and not all of the group survived. They were taken in by the Catholic Church in Cape Town and have created good lives for themselves. These guys were so excited to play on the score. Several of them are on camera in the film too.

DM: Which of the sounds, instruments or musical techniques you worked with in Africa most intrigued you, and will you utilize any of these in future scores?

JF: Melding the African instruments into a score was a massive challenge. I recorded in South Africa while the film was being shot. I ended up with about 800 short performances and phrases, which were painstakingly looped and loaded by my associate, Frederik Wiedmann, into Native Instruments Intakt software. Then I was able to adjust the tempo and the key of each phrase as I was composing to picture. Electronic instruments and a 70-piece orchestra ended up making this 80-minute score, by far the most complex I have ever created.

The Doctor
11-03-2010, 01:21 PM
This wouldn't happen to be for the British television series about dinosaurs coming into present time, would it?

Either way, thanks for the share!

sorei
11-03-2010, 02:36 PM
I added info about the score :)

Zoran
11-04-2010, 04:59 AM
Thank you nachito_pop & sorei. :)

tangotreats
11-04-2010, 09:51 AM
I seem to remember Dominik was talking about a possible release for his Primeval scores... I'd love to hear them away from the show.

Orie
11-04-2010, 09:59 AM
so, this is not a TV, it's a Movie.
I saw this like... 2 weeks ago. XD
I died laughing with the end XDXDXD

Thanks for this ;)

sorei
11-04-2010, 12:15 PM
so, this is not a TV, it's a Movie.
I saw this like... 2 weeks ago. XD
I died laughing with the end XDXDXD

Thanks for this ;)


well, I could go for: it is a TV movie, but I am not even sure about that *lol* nachito had called it 'TV', so that was what I called it as well (I admit I mixed it up with the tv-series at first, it was only after googling that I realized this was a movie!)

:D

boogiepop.phantom
11-04-2010, 12:41 PM
well, I could go for: it is a TV movie

It actually got a cinema release...at least in the USA

sorei
11-04-2010, 12:44 PM
It actually got a cinema release...at least in the USA

that's why I said: I could

...of course, at some point they all are in tv ;)

*lol*

anyway, I deleted it from the subtitle :D

Rad¬Max
06-30-2011, 10:43 AM
i didn't know this was a tv movie flick, nevertheless though critics may have not like it, i did enjoy this one..the score, is good too...

I'm taking the upgrade now of my copy..thanks sorei for sharing!

boogiepop.phantom
06-30-2011, 11:19 AM
i didn't know this was a tv movie flick

It actually had a limited cinema run. It was not made for TV.
It was not great but the chase scene in the desert was simply awesome. The score's good too.

Rad¬Max
06-30-2011, 11:56 AM
It actually had a limited cinema run. It was not made for TV.
It was not great but the chase scene in the desert was simply awesome. The score's good too.

awhile back when i was searching for it's score, the other primeval is whats coming out, the one with the Dinosaurs?... I think it also find its way in cinema houses from where we are so i never thought of it as a tv movie feature...

ggctuk2005
06-30-2011, 11:59 AM
Drawn in by the title, sorely disaapointed.

bishtyboshty
06-30-2011, 12:04 PM
I don't now think there'll ever be an official release of the dino-series score. A great pity, and it looks like series 6 (if it ever happens) will not be filmed until 2013 at the earliest.

Rad¬Max
06-30-2011, 12:06 PM
I don't now think there'll ever be an official release of the dino-series score. A great pity, and it looks like series 6 (if it ever happens) will not be filmed until 2013 at the earliest.


was that series good? just got curious to know :)

sorei
06-30-2011, 12:11 PM
was that series good? just got curious to know :)

depends, I admit I like the series a lot.

Rad¬Max
06-30-2011, 12:15 PM
i see, thanks. :)

......

it's my 400th posts! :D

sorei
06-30-2011, 12:20 PM
i see, thanks. :)

......

it's my 400th posts! :D

congrats to your 400. post!

Primeval TV SERIES plot + reception (wiki):


Primeval is a British science fiction television programme produced for ITV by Impossible Pictures. Created by Adrian Hodges and Tim Haines, who previously created the Walking with... documentary series. Primeval follows a team of five scientists tasked with investigating the appearance of temporal anomalies across Great Britain through which prehistoric and futuristic creatures enter the present.

Series 1 followed the efforts of Professor Nick Cutter (Douglas Henshall) and his associates, a friend and colleague Stephen Hart (James Murray), a student Connor Temple (Andrew-Lee Potts), a zookeeper Abby Maitland (Hannah Spearritt) as they investigate the appearance of anomalies (called "earthquakes in time") that allow the passage to other times and places, allowing often-dangerous creatures from the distant past or future to threaten the lives of citizens. The British government's Home Office, under the supervision of James Lester (Ben Miller) and Claudia Brown (Lucy Brown), becomes involved after a Gorgonopsid travels through one such anomaly and wreaks havoc in the Forest of Dean. Professor Cutter's wife, Helen Cutter (Juliet Aubrey), presumed dead for eight years, was revealed to have been travelling in time through the anomalies. Cutter was unable to convince her to help as she had changed much from the woman he had once known, and he began to fall in love with Claudia. Meanwhile Abby began to take care of a Coelurosauravus she named Rex after he was left behind in the present, and was attracted to Stephen, who didn't completely reciprocate her feelings, despite Connor's attempts to get with her. The final episode of the first series involves discovery of an anomaly to the future in the Permian, allowing Predators from the future access to the past, and ultimately the present. Cutter, who travelled through an anomaly with Helen, who came back to help with the predators, attempted a mission to secure the anomaly so that the future predators couldn't change the time-line, but ultimately failed. Upon returning he discovered Stephen had once had an affair with Helen before she had disappeared, and then learned that Claudia Brown never existed as the time-line had changed very slightly after their trip, and only he and Helen were aware of it....
Series 2 established that the camp discovered in the first episode was actually that of the team and that they had created their own past. Due to Cutter and Helen's visit to the camp, they affected the time-line, although this was the second time at the camp (the first was finding the camp, the second time years or months earlier setting up the camp so it can be found by them later), which had resulted in the disappearance of Claudia Brown from the time-line...


Reception

TV critic Charlie Brooker reviewed Primeval in the final episode of his BBC Four show Screenwipe, and gave it a rave review saying that it was "far better than Torchwood for instance" commenting "I hope you're listening, Russell T Davies". "Unashamedly Saturday night populist viewing for the masses" with "some of the best special effects [he'd] ever seen... in a British TV show" he went on.[39][dead link]
First broadcast on BBC America on 9 August 2008, Primeval met with generally favourable reviews among American critics, earning 73 out of 100 on the aggregate review site Metacritic.[40] Calling the show both child-friendly and entertaining for adults, Maureen Ryan of the Chicago Tribune noted the unusual date of the American première, stating that "most networks...have shied away from launching shows during August, when the Beijing Olympics are expected to dominate the TV landscape."[41] Rob Owen of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette praised Primeval's special effects and sense of humor.[42] Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times criticized the music and emotional direction of the narrative, saying of protagonist Nick Cutter "I know your wife has been missing for years, but ye gods, man, that's a bloody dinosaur."[43]
Comparisons have been made between Primeval and the popular BBC series Doctor Who, which is famous for its use of time travel. The producers of Primeval have consistently resisted comparison of the series with Doctor Who, calling Primeval more "reality-based." Actor Douglas Henshall instead compared the series to The A-Team, calling Primeval an ensemble piece featuring characters with different backgrounds who must work together.[44] Torchwood creator and former Doctor Who head writer Russell T Davies commented on the show in 2007, criticising Primeval's lack of ethnic casting as "shameful," but then adding "apart from that, I think it's excellent".[45] Sarah Page, played by the Moroccan-Indian actress Laila Rouass, joined the show temporarily as a member of the main team for Series 3.

GRASE2008
07-03-2014, 01:03 PM
Thanks friend fos the post!!! Thanks a lot ;)

Kaolin
07-03-2014, 04:29 PM
Thanks.

laohu
07-03-2014, 05:16 PM
thanks for the reup sorei!!

Jerry Will
05-21-2018, 08:28 PM
I hate to ask again, but I'd love a re-up of this too, if possible. Thank you very much.

cybellio
05-22-2018, 03:16 AM
Taaadaaaaa ;)

Gustav ([Only registered and activated users can see links]!eMJQ2QAQ!sYi9_KuwAwtJC_YiKUFLF0tpI-m-9HcDQ6zeA4ALA7g)

---------- Post added at 11:16 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:15 AM ----------


I hate to ask again, but I'd love a re-up of this too, if possible. Thank you very much.

Taaadaaaaa ;)

Gustav ([Only registered and activated users can see links]!eMJQ2QAQ!sYi9_KuwAwtJC_YiKUFLF0tpI-m-9HcDQ6zeA4ALA7g)

Jerry Will
05-22-2018, 05:03 AM
Oh thank you so much cybellio!

Dave999
05-22-2018, 09:30 AM
Taaadaaaaa ;)

Thanks!

Edgewater
05-22-2018, 01:33 PM
Thanks for the re-up!!

cybellio
05-22-2018, 07:05 PM
Oh thank you so much cybellio!

You're welcome :)

---------- Post added at 03:05 AM ---------- Previous post was at 03:04 AM ----------


Thanks for the re-up!!

With Pleasure :)

---------- Post added at 03:05 AM ---------- Previous post was at 03:05 AM ----------


Thanks!

You're welcome :) :) :)