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streichorchester
07-30-2008, 04:11 PM
I have 500GB and 100 cds of classical music mainly from early 20th century composers, but that barely scratches the surface of what's out there.

What I have: Near complete collections of Mahler, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Vaughan Williams, Ravel, Bartok, Webern, Dvorak, Penderecki, Copland, and lots of other huge orchestral works.

What I don't have: Chamber works, anything pre-Beethoven (some exceptions, but not many), but request them anyway because hey, you might get lucky

What I'm looking for: symphonies by Rautavaara, Myaskovsky, Havergal Brian, Malcolm Arnold, Popov, etc.


For those of you with access to a university/college library, those cds aren't doing them any good gathering dust on the shelves, so get plundering!

Edit:
Here's everything posted by me thus far. If anyone else wants their links posted here, let me know.

[Only registered and activated users can see links] - Sibelius's Symphony No. 5
[Only registered and activated users can see links] le_Year_1919_Suite.rar - Shosty's The Fall of Berlin and The Unforgettable Year 1919 Suite
[Only registered and activated users can see links] - the classical pieces James Horner ripped off for Willow
[Only registered and activated users can see links] - Prokofiev's October Revolution Cantata - GET THIS NOW!!
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links] - Mahler's Symphony No. 5
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links] - Prokofiev's Ivan the Terrible film score suite
[Only registered and activated users can see links] - Schnittke's Concerto Grosso No. 1 - GET THIS TOO!!
[Only registered and activated users can see links] - The complete Hanson symphonies and some orchestral works
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links] - Proof there is a Jesus! Kabalevsky's Requiem and Fourth Symphony

Please let me know about any dead links or if you have any requests for 19th-20th century classical music/composers.

mouseDown
07-30-2008, 04:27 PM
thanks! anything by Tchaikovsky?

tangotreats
07-30-2008, 04:35 PM
I have all of Hanson's symphonies, and Rautavaara's 7th and 8th, plus a few other works (Angels and Visitations, Piano Concerti, etc.) I have Arnold's 1st and 2nd Symphonies.

I have Havergal Brian - DEFINITELY sure about 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 16th, 17th, 31st, 32nd. Think I have the 10th somewhere. Not sure about the rest - they might be on other hard disks. Also have numerous other Brian pieces.

The bootleg LP of the Gothic is amazing (the famous Aries recording.)

Matey, you have EXCELLENT taste, and I can just tell that this is going to become my favourite thread...

streichorchester
07-30-2008, 04:39 PM
Symphonies, Serenade for Strings, Manfred, The Snow Maiden, Piano Concertos 1 and 2, Concert Fantasie... but it's not like I'm going to post ALL of them right now. You have to be specific.

Believe it or not, I don't have a decent version of The Nutcracker (terrible orchestra) or Swan Lake (artifacts in compression), though I could post them if someone wanted them disparately enough. If someone has a good recording of the two, I'd appreciate him posting them instead. I'm also looking for Romeo and Juliet, tone poems, Queen of Spades, etc.

streichorchester
07-30-2008, 04:43 PM
Awesome!

I have The Gothic too, obviously :D, it's the only thing I have by him. But how are the rest?

tangotreats
07-30-2008, 04:57 PM
NOT a great deal like the Gothic!

Some of the later symphonies are very, very brutal. Not just in their tone, but in their construction. Some of them are less than ten minutes long - fragmentary, almost annoyed pieces. Like Brian was writing it down and thought, "Aw, I've had enough of that!" and suddenly there's a new theme or just a big, unexpected orchestral howl of aggression, then it's the end. It's fascinating stuff.

The 4th is a lot like the Gothic - it's choral, again, but with (slightly) smaller forces.

My own favourite is the 3rd - it started off as a concerto for two pianos, so in its final symphonic form, it retains very prominent parts for pianos. The scoring is absolutely magificent. The third movement is Brian chanelling Strauss - a lovely lilting waltz. The whole symphony lurches around from dissonant terror, MASSIVE orchestral grandeur (almost religious fervour), pastoral subtlety, vicious percussion, a jovial waltz, and back again - and yet, it ALL fits together so beautifully.

Since that's my favourite, I'll upload that one first, if that's OK... :)

streichorchester
07-30-2008, 05:19 PM
Yes, please do.

Also, what other unknown choral symphonies do you have? I have Pettersson's 12th, Myaskovsky's 6th, Scriabin's 1st, and Hamerik's 7th (along with his amazing Requiem.) Still looking out for Holst's Choral-Symphony and I hope it's better than The Cloud Messenger.

Cristobalito2007
07-31-2008, 02:56 AM
Thank you so much for the Scythian and Quest.

My contribution of a lesser known romantic composer -

Joly Braga Santos
Symphony 4 & Symphonic Variations on a popular song from the Alentejo

Joly Braga Santos was born in Lisbon in 1924 and died there in 1988, at the height of his musical creativity. Although he composed only six symphonies, he was undoubtedly the leading Portuguese symphonist of the century and, in a way, of all time. Apart from an innate sense for good orchestration, his musical language is based on a strong sense of musical architecture as well as drama, with long melodic lines and a natural instinct for structural development as well as formal coherence. In his own words, he wanted to contribute "toward a Latin symphonism and to react against the predominant tendency, of the generation that preceded me, to reject monumentalism in music".
- Excerpt from Naxos

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Enjoy this romantic and lush album.

C

Shiryu
07-31-2008, 03:24 AM
Did not expect to find a classical composer from Lisbon Portugal here. Thanks for the upload, Cristobalito. v ^_^

tangotreats
07-31-2008, 07:13 AM
Cristobalito2007, that is a truly gorgeous symphony - thank you! :D

Streich: I forgot - I have Kabelevsky's 4th, (not the third - sorry) and some Myaskovsky symphonies also. Will give more info later. :)

Cristobalito2007
07-31-2008, 08:38 AM
You're very welcome friends. I'll upload another Bragos Symphony soon. This one is even more melodic and powerful.

arthierr
08-01-2008, 01:53 PM
Great music, thanks!

Streich, you wrote that in one of your posts :

"Vaughan Williams is a great composer who can write some of the most beautiful pastoral music"

Well, I also adore pastoral music (wonderful Beethoven's 6th symphony), so could you please upload a selection of this music? thanks.

jalvarez82
08-01-2008, 02:02 PM
I love classical music. Thanks for ths post.

herbaciak
08-01-2008, 04:08 PM
I just red about Gothic Symphony and... WOW! Huge thing it must be! I never heard of it before but I'm really interested now:). So could U upload it?:)

Henry Spencer
08-01-2008, 04:41 PM
Yeah, I like those dark symphonies too, please do upload it.

streichorchester
08-01-2008, 06:04 PM
Vaughan Williams - [Only registered and activated users can see links]

Symphonies
No. 1 "A Sea Symphony" - massive choral symphony and awesome
No. 2 "London" - restored version (Chandos CD) - makes me think of outer space for some reason
No. 3 "Pastoral" - (Chandos CD)
No. 4 - Jerry Goldsmith got his Klingon theme from this war-like symphony - (Chandos CD)
No. 5 - this one should have been called the pastoral
No. 6 - another war-like symphony like the 4th - (Chandos CD)
No. 7 "Antarctica" - If you like Scott of the Antarctic, this symphony is based on it
No. 8 - Vaughan William's most modern symphony, crazy stuff, but not war-like - (Chandos CD)
No. 9 - a pastoral-like symphony using an orchestra containing some saxophones

My scale of likability from first to last: 5, 2, 1, 7, 4, 6, 9, 3, 8

Orchestral Pieces
The Lark Ascending - awesome work for solo violin and orchestra
Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis - awesome work for string orchestra
5 Variants of "Dives and Lazarus" - awesome work for string orchestra
Norfolk Rhapsodies 1 and 2
Overture to The Wasps
Fantasia on Greensleeves
The Running Set
3 English Folk Songs - popular piece for band

Choral/Vocal Works
Dona Nobis Pacem - a powerful oratorio
Toward the Unknown Region
Willow-Wood
The Voice out of the Whirlwind
The Sons of Light
Sancta Civitas
Mass in G minor
6 Choral Songs
Nocturne
Serenade To Music
Five Mystical Songs
Flos Campi - a work for chorus, orchestra, and viola solo, reminiscent of Ravel's Daphnis et Chloe

Operas
The Pilgrim's Progress - The basis for Symphony No. 5

Ballet
Job: A Masque for Dancing

Concertos
Piano Concerto
Oboe Concerto
Violin Concerto - don't have this
Suite for Viola and Small Orchestra - don't have this
Bass Tuba Concerto - don't have this

Chamber Works
Phantasy Quintet
String Quartet No. 1
String Quartet No. 2
Six Studies in English Folk Song - I played this in uni on clarinet, themes taken from various works like Norfolk Rhapsody and film scores

Film Scores
Film Music Vol. 1 (Scott of the Antarctic, Coastal Command Suite, The People's Land) (Chandos CD)
Film Music Vol. 2 - don't have
Film Music Vol. 3 - don't have

What I'm looking for
-anything I don't have, especially choral works

Here are symphonies 5 and 9: [Only registered and activated users can see links]

arthierr
08-01-2008, 06:24 PM
That's a LOT of music. As I don't know very well this composer, I trust your taste (wich I know is excellent ;)). Could you please select some of his works you find most interesting, especially if pastoral.

Also, a pastoral-like symphony with sax seems highly worth listening.

edit: oops, I didn't notice the link at the bottom. Thanks a lot!

herbaciak
08-02-2008, 05:21 AM
And I need more Braga Santos! Beautiful music, just beautiful!:) So I am waiting:). Thanks mate!

crusaderofhonor
08-02-2008, 01:41 PM
what do you have from philip glass?

streichorchester
08-02-2008, 03:10 PM
Kundun
Cello Concerto
Concerto for two Timpanists and Orchestra (good piece)
Itaipu, The Canyon
Violin Concerto (good piece)
Dance from Akhnaten

I'm going to upload some more Vaughan Williams next, and then the version of Brian's Gothic Symphony found here. ([Only registered and activated users can see links])

Cristobalito2007
08-02-2008, 03:29 PM
As requested -

Joly BRAGA SANTOS (1924-1988)
Symphony No. 2 (1947)

# Largo - Allegro energico ed appassionato - 14:53
# Adagio non troppo - 12:19
# Allegretto pastorale - 6:08
# Lento, Allegro, Epilogo (Lento) - 15:19

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

streichorchester
08-02-2008, 04:29 PM
Here are some of Vaughan Williams's most beautiful non-symphonic orchestral works:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

The Lark Ascending
Fantasia on Greensleeves
Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
5 Variants of "Dives and Lazarus"
Oboe Concerto

Let me know if the quality is okay.

arthierr
08-02-2008, 04:46 PM
Greatly appreciate, thanks. ;)

(more comments after listening)

By the way, what do you mean by "non-symphonic orchestral"? That it's played by a smaller orchestra?

streichorchester
08-02-2008, 05:03 PM
If I rip the Gothic Symphony, how would people prefer it: as individual mp3s or a large image file with cue sheet? The mp3s would be smaller, but the breaks in between tracks would be noticeable when you play them (CD1 is 25 tracks, CD2 is 21.)

katie price
08-02-2008, 05:36 PM
i am very sorry

do you have vaughan williams films scores ?

arthierr
08-02-2008, 10:48 PM
Here are some of Vaughan Williams's most beautiful non-symphonic orchestral works:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

The Lark Ascending
Fantasia on Greensleeves
Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
5 Variants of "Dives and Lazarus"
Oboe Concerto

Let me know if the quality is okay.

Really nice music, very soothing and gracious. Particularly appreciated the Oboe Concerto.

Quality is good (well, just a slight problem if I may : "Vaughan Williams - Five Variants of 'Dives and Lazarus' - Theme.mp3" has a peak volume level of -13,5 dB and the others vars are moreless similar. But no big deal, can be easily fixed with mp3directcut or mp3gain).

Poscow
08-02-2008, 11:08 PM
If I rip the Gothic Symphony, how would people prefer it: as individual mp3s or a large image file with cue sheet? The mp3s would be smaller, but the breaks in between tracks would be noticeable when you play them (CD1 is 25 tracks, CD2 is 21.)

I would like it as mp3s personally.

herbaciak
08-03-2008, 04:44 AM
Thanks for Braga Santos! I appreciate. Have you got anything more from him?:) And as for Gothic - I prefer mp3s, but if tracks merges fluently than definetly ape or something like that. After all I can split 'em and convert by myself:). So yes, ape would be nice:). And about Philip Glass - I've got full Akhnaten, Dracula - performed by Kronos Quartet, Illusionist, Notes of Scandal, Heroes Symphony, Koyani and Naqoykatsi, Solo Piano, Symphony no. 6 and 8 and Einstein on a Beach. But I'm not familiar with all those rapidshares etc. so I need a tutorial:).

streichorchester
08-03-2008, 05:40 PM
i have snoop dogg, eminem.

castlevania symphony of the night is classical music.

do you have vaughan williams films scores ?

I have all of snoop dogg's symphonies but none of his chamber works. By eminem I have his first 3 symphonies, 2 piano concertos, and the cello concerto he wrote for Rostropovich. Still trying to track down that cantata.

kingnazgul
08-03-2008, 06:18 PM
This is a great thread, you're efforts are appreciated.

I am personally on a search for Ives' Universe Symphony (any of the three versions) and Grohg by Copland.

Also, do you have performer info for your collection?

streichorchester
08-03-2008, 06:48 PM
This is a great thread, you're efforts are appreciated.

I am personally on a search for Ives' Universe Symphony (any of the three versions) and Grohg by Copland.

Also, do you have performer info for your collection?

I have:

Universe Symphony 37:56
Gerhard Samuel; Cincinnati Philharmonia Orchestra - 1994

and this version of Grohg:

[Only registered and activated users can see links] ([Only registered and activated users can see links])

streichorchester
08-04-2008, 12:54 AM
Here it is:

Havergal Brian - Symphony No. 1 "The Gothic"

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

I tried a different compression, so let me know how it sounds.

tangotreats
08-04-2008, 04:42 AM
Really nice music, very soothing and gracious. Particularly appreciated the Oboe Concerto.

Quality is good (well, just a slight problem if I may : "Vaughan Williams - Five Variants of 'Dives and Lazarus' - Theme.mp3" has a peak volume level of -13,5 dB and the others vars are moreless similar. But no big deal, can be easily fixed with mp3directcut or mp3gain).

That's not a problem - it's a sign of a sensible engineer in the recording studio. The peak volume is low because the piece is quiet. In classical music recordings, the quiet bits are quiet, and the loud bits are loud. Generally you won't find much (any) dynamics compression going on turning the whole sound into a blasting muddy mess of white noise... ;)

kingnazgul
08-04-2008, 02:34 PM
I have:

Universe Symphony 37:56
Gerhard Samuel; Cincinnati Philharmonia Orchestra - 1994

and this version of Grohg:

[Only registered and activated users can see links] ([Only registered and activated users can see links])



Wow...you're my new favorite person. Those are exactly what I'm looking for.

streichorchester
08-04-2008, 03:08 PM
I'll post them in a bit.

In the meantime you wouldn't happen to have Ives' Symphony No. 3, would you? I'm also interested in finding stuff by Barber, which is what I'm going to be downloading next when my downloads reset at emusic.

Trajan
08-04-2008, 03:19 PM
What I have: Near complete collections of Mahler, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Vaughan Williams, Ravel, Bartok, Webern, Dvorak, Penderecki, Copland, and lots of other huge orchestral works.

What I don't have: Chamber works, anything pre-Beethoven (some exceptions, but not many), but request them anyway because hey, you might get lucky

What I'm looking for: symphonies by Hanson, Rautavaara, Myaskovsky, Havergal Brian, Malcolm Arnold, Popov, Kabalevsky's 4th, and the rarest symphony of all: Kabalevsky's 3rd.

Popov, eh? You might be interested to know that I own all three Popov CDs that were released by Olympia back in the mid 1990's. They're long out of print. I remember special ordering them after reading an enthusiastic Gramophone review for them. Give me some time and I'll post up all three.

You say you have Dvorak, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, and Webern? Do you happen to have these CDs?

Vaclav Talich and Karel Ancerl conducting Dvorak's Eighth Symphony DG's Webern 6 CD box set conducted by Boulez

Also, what recordings do you have of Prokofiev's Sixth Symphony and Shostakovich's Fourth and Fifteenth?

As I said, give me some time and I'll post up the Popov CDs. They should be ready by Friday.

arthierr
08-04-2008, 03:30 PM
Also years ago I borrowed at the library an incredible version of Dvorak's 7 and 8 symphonies conducted by sir Colin Davis. Absolutly fantastic conducting and performance.

I recorded it on Lp (yes, it's THAT long ago), and tried later to borrow it back but it was gone and replaced by an horrible version by an obscure eastern Europe orchestra.

Maybe you have the first one, and if so could you please up? thanks.

kingnazgul
08-04-2008, 03:40 PM
I'll post them in a bit.

In the meantime you wouldn't happen to have Ives' Symphony No. 3, would you? I'm also interested in finding stuff by Barber, which is what I'm going to be downloading next when my downloads reset at emusic.

I don't actually have all that much music right now. I'm rebuilding my collection after having most of my cds stolen... Hopefully in the near future I'll have some things to contribute.

streichorchester
08-04-2008, 04:19 PM
Popov, eh? You might be interested to know that I own all three Popov CDs that were released by Olympia back in the mid 1990's. They're long out of print. I remember special ordering them after reading an enthusiastic Gramophone review for them. Give me some time and I'll post up all three.

Olympia CDs are hard to come by these days (see Kabalevsky's 3rd) so it'd be awesome if you could upload those Popov, especially if you have his first symphony.


Vaclav Talich and Karel Ancerl conducting Dvorak's Eighth Symphony DG's Webern 6 CD box set conducted by Boulez

For Dvorak's 8th I have the Zubin Mehta+LA Philharmonic one from Naxos, and the complete symphonies conducted by Istvan Kertesz with the LSO. The complete Webern by Boulez is exactly the one I have. I grabbed it from avaxsphere before it went down. Unfortunately I didn't keep the CD image files and split it into wavs. It's not like there was anything lost, and I can upload it if you want, but I'm guessing you might have preferred the ape+cue files. They're posting them here [Only registered and activated users can see links] (as mp3s I think.)


Also, what recordings do you have of Prokofiev's Sixth Symphony and Shostakovich's Fourth and Fifteenth?

For Prokofiev's 6th I have the Rostropovich with the Orchestre National de France collection, and the silly White Box which is arguably my worst classical music purchase of all time, but it was cheap. For Shostakovich's 4th I have the complete symphonies by Rostropovich (also includes the 15th) and for the 15th I have the Olympia with Mravinsky and Stravinsky's Agon.

streichorchester
08-05-2008, 01:52 PM
Copland stuff can be found on this blog, including Grohg:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

And here's the Ives: [Only registered and activated users can see links]
-Universe Symphony
-Orchestral Set No. 2
-The Unanswered Question
Gerhard Samuel; Cincinnati Philharmonia Orchestra

Trajan
08-05-2008, 05:59 PM
For Prokofiev's 6th I have the Rostropovich with the Orchestre National de France collection, and the silly White Box which is arguably my worst classical music purchase of all time, but it was cheap. For Shostakovich's 4th I have the complete symphonies by Rostropovich (also includes the 15th) and for the 15th I have the Olympia with Mravinsky and Stravinsky's Agon.

If you could post the link for the Rostropovich's Shostakovich set, that would be fantastic! I would also love to hear Mravinsky's recording of the Fifteenth.

I have an LP transfer of Shostakovich's Fifteenth played by the USSR Symphony Orchestra under Maxim Shostakovich. As far as I know, it has never been transferred to CD. Would you be interested in my posting that recording?

Thanks! :)

streichorchester
08-05-2008, 08:27 PM
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 15 and Stravinsky's Agon conducted by Mravinsky:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Shostakovich's Symphony No. 6 conducted by Rostropovich:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Sure, post whatever you like. Is the 15th your favourite? For me it's the 8th.

Luisfer
08-05-2008, 09:18 PM
Great thread this is... I'm a pianist myself and I've been looking everywhere for the Shostakovich's 2nd Piano Concerto. Do you have it?

Greetings from Colombia, South America

streichorchester
08-06-2008, 01:59 PM
Great thread this is... I'm a pianist myself and I've been looking everywhere for the Shostakovich's 2nd Piano Concerto. Do you have it?

Greetings from Colombia, South America

Right here: [Only registered and activated users can see links]

I think the tags are mislabeled though since this is the Naxos version with Christopher Lyndon-Gee and the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra from 1995.

tangotreats
08-06-2008, 04:47 PM
Everything posted here so far is great - thanks everybody!

I'll comment more shortly, but I have just enough time for one little message for the fine gentleman who started this thread: Some people are idiots - and a sure sign that somebody is an idiot is when they start calling you one - usually when they see that your argument is better than theirs. I know (believe me, I know) it's tempting to battle these morons, but all you will do is make yourself upset, and fuel their fevered ranting. Their actions are more than enough to demonstrate their idiocy to the people around them. Particularly when said people are known bastards - vicious, ignorant fools with a superiority complex - who are best left to their own devices. To any sensible person, you've already won your argument - to everybody else, you will never win... Such is life, my friend. :)

Luisfer
08-06-2008, 09:10 PM
Wow... so fast... you're my hero, many many thanks man. Keep the great contributions

Luisfer
08-06-2008, 09:14 PM
If I may do another request... Penderecki's Requiem would be amazing

streichorchester
08-07-2008, 11:08 PM
Here's Penderecki's A Polish Requiem:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

kingnazgul
08-08-2008, 10:55 AM
Hmm...How about Ligeti's Le Grand macabre?

1337
08-08-2008, 11:00 AM
WOW FINALLY, a classical thread!

could someone help me out; I'm looking for Scriabin's etudes (Op. 8)
and also Sibelius Symphony No. 5 (If possible Kurt Sanderling recording)

also please upload by either rapidshare or megaupload, sendspace doesn't work for me (country slot always full 24/7...)

streichorchester
08-09-2008, 04:37 PM
Hmm...How about Ligeti's Le Grand macabre?

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

If you ask me, Messiaen's Turangalila Symphony is much better.

1337: I have Karajan conducting the 5th, is that okay?

I don't have any of Scriabin's solo piano works, sorry.

kingnazgul
08-09-2008, 07:19 PM
I like Ligeti's quirkiness. I find the Turangalila Symphony to be a completely different listening experience. They are both great works though.

1337
08-10-2008, 02:43 AM
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

If you ask me, Messiaen's Turangalila Symphony is much better.

1337: I have Karajan conducting the 5th, is that okay?

I don't have any of Scriabin's solo piano works, sorry.


streichorchester, do you have any other recordings of Sibelius' 5th? besides Karajan that it. If so could you list them down for me? if NOT, that please go ahead and upload the Karajan recording.

Thanks alot!

streichorchester
08-12-2008, 05:59 PM
Sorry, I don't have any other recordings of the 5th. Here's the Karajan: [Only registered and activated users can see links]

This blog has all of Sibelius's symphonies too, so check them out if you want a different version: [Only registered and activated users can see links]

1337
08-14-2008, 09:54 AM
Thanks for the Sibelius 5th!

Say, do you happen to have any recordings of Scriabin's 1st symphony? (I have Riccardo Muti & Leif Segerstam recordings) if so please upload them

Also do you have any of Alexander Glazunov's symphonies? I'm looking for a full cycle of his symphonies.

and of course thanks for all the help.

JohnGalt
08-14-2008, 10:31 AM
streichorchester,

It's great to see someone willing to offer so many wonderful classical recordings. I'm very interested in the Bartok material that you might have - which works do you have?

jewsdidwtc
08-14-2008, 10:49 AM
I'd love some Wagner if you have any.

streichorchester
08-14-2008, 07:03 PM
Thanks for the Sibelius 5th!

Say, do you happen to have any recordings of Scriabin's 1st symphony? (I have Riccardo Muti & Leif Segerstam recordings) if so please upload them

Also do you have any of Alexander Glazunov's symphonies? I'm looking for a full cycle of his symphonies.

and of course thanks for all the help.

Sorry, I only have the Muti recordings of Scriabin's symphonies with the Philadelphia Symphony. For the Glazunov cycle I have Jarvi and the Bavarian Radio Symphony which is a good 1.3 gigs.


streichorchester,

It's great to see someone willing to offer so many wonderful classical recordings. I'm very interested in the Bartok material that you might have - which works do you have?

For Bartok I have:

Piano Concertos 1-3
Scherzo for piano and orchestra
Rhapsody for piano and orchestra
Concerto for 2 pianos, percussion, and orchestra
Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta (many recordings)
String Quartets 1-6 (Emerson Quartet)
The Miraculous Mandarin (many recordings)
Concerto for Orchestra (many recordings)
The Wooden Prince (awesome ballet)
Two Portraits
Divertimento for Strings
Violin Concertos 1-2
Rhapsodies 1-2
Romanian Folk Dances
Romanian Dance
Dance Suite
Hungarian Pictures
Two Pictures (different from the portraits)
Bluebeard's Castle
Cantata Profana (awesome choral work)
several misc piano works including some of the Mikrokosmos and sonatas


I'd love some Wagner if you have any.

I have the complete Ring cycle and the overtures from the other operas. Nothing else.

crusaderofhonor
08-15-2008, 01:24 AM
I would like whatever you can give me from Philip Glass when you get the chance then. The Dance from Akhnaten especially. Thanks for offering this.

Tsobanian
08-15-2008, 05:44 AM
@streichorchester, thanks a lot man!!!!!

Do you have these?
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]


Especially this one?
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

jewsdidwtc
08-15-2008, 04:02 PM
I have the complete Ring cycle and the overtures from the other operas. Nothing else.

I'm not sure how big the complete Ring cycle is, but if it wouldn't be too much of a problem I'd love to get that. Thanks.

1337
08-17-2008, 06:33 AM
streichorchester,

I've never listened to the whole cycle of Glazunov's symphonies except the 5th. could you upload the 7th symphony (Pastorale) please?

Also besides the Pichas Zuckerman recording, how many other recordings of The Lark Ascending do you have? please list them down if you can.

And lastly, do you happen to have Glazunov's Saxophone concerto?

Thanks so much, you're thread is legendary!

Tsobanian
08-17-2008, 08:36 AM
Streichorchester, do you have these?

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

1337
08-17-2008, 08:46 AM
Streichorchester, do you have these?

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Tsobanian, for the prokofiev Symphnoy No. 5, there are 2 recordings on P.Q.P Bach.org

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

and

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

The first link has both the 5th symphony and also "Lieutenant Kije" but it seems to be missing the 5th movement "The Funeral of Kije"...

Tsobanian
08-17-2008, 08:50 AM
Tsobanian, for the prokofiev Symphnoy No. 5, there are 2 recordings on P.Q.P Bach.org

[Only registered and activated users can see links]




Thanks a lot!
These orchestral works of the Russian composers are so addictive!
Too bad that it is missing the last movement of the Lieutenant Kije Suite.

streichorchester
08-17-2008, 01:10 PM
Okay, I'm going to upload Glass's Dance from Akhnaten then Glazunov's 4th and 7th (because they're on the same CD.) And yes, I have the saxophone concerto.

For The Lark Ascending I also have Nigel Kennedy/Rattle and the City Of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra from 1997.

Tsobanian:
I have Swan Lake, Manfred, Prokofiev's 5th, The Year 1941, Lt. Kije, Love for Three Oranges (both suite and opera), Romeo and Juliet, Cinderella, Execution of Stepan Razin, October, 5 Fragments, The Fall of Berlin, The Unforgettable Year 1919 Suite

I don't have Voyevoda or The Red Poppy (which is on my toget list for emusic actually)

Tsobanian
08-17-2008, 01:33 PM
Tsobanian:
I have Swan Lake, Manfred, Prokofiev's 5th, The Year 1941, Lt. Kije, Love for Three Oranges (both suite and opera), Romeo and Juliet, Cinderella, Execution of Stepan Razin, October, 5 Fragments, The Fall of Berlin, The Unforgettable Year 1919 Suite

I don't have Voyevoda or The Red Poppy (which is on my toget list for emusic actually)


How pity... I have The Red Poppy Suite, but I was looking for the Red Poppy Complete Ballet.

If you have the alacrity upload some stuff such as: Swan Lake, The Year 1941, Lt. Kije Suite, Cinderella, Execution of Stepan Razin, October, 5 Fragments, The Fall of Berlin, The Unforgettable Year 1919 Suite.
I also surmise that you have "Ivan the Terrible"....
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

streichorchester
08-17-2008, 10:18 PM
Philip Glass - Violin Concerto, Prelude & Dance from Akhnaten
Adele Anthony, Ulster Symphony Orchestra

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]


Glazunov - Symphonies 4 and 7
Jarvi, Bamberg Symphony Orchestra

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

jewsdidwtc: The Ring Cycle is 1.5 gigs, so I suggest finding a torrent because that's too much work for something very few people are going to actively listen to (there is a definite collector mentality going on at the ffshrine)

Tsobanian: I'll see what I can do. Swan Lake is a pretty tall order compared to the others.

Tsobanian
08-18-2008, 12:28 AM
Tsobanian: Swan Lake is a pretty tall order compared to the others.

Ok then, forget it!


I'd really like to have stuff like these
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

1337
08-18-2008, 01:40 AM
streichorchester thanks alot for uploading the links. For the glazunov sax concerto you don't need to upload the .flac files. Mp3 files at 320kb/s is good enough for me, saves us both the time.

thanks so much again.

JohnGalt
08-18-2008, 09:06 AM
streichorchester, thanks very much for elaborating on your Bartok collection. I would be very eager to get my hands on just about all of it, but I don't want to pressure you to upload them all at once since it's hugely inconvenient. Whenever you get to uploading more things though, I would appreciate it if you could throw in a Bartok item or two for me.

Thanks very much!! :)

jewsdidwtc
08-18-2008, 04:51 PM
Whoa, 1.5gb is way more than I want anyway. I found some smaller "best-of"-ish collections looking around, those should be more than enough for me for now. Thanks anyway.

Tsobanian
08-19-2008, 03:15 AM
Streichorchester, do you have these?


[Only registered and activated users can see links]


R.Q.P. Bach has this CD, no need for upload.
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Plus this one! Yay!!!! Shostakovich's Jazz Suites are marvelous!
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

streichorchester
08-21-2008, 06:11 PM
Some Bartok orchestral works to get people started:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
The Wooden Prince Suite (not entire ballet) (as heard in The Land Before Time)
Two Portraits

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
Music for Strings,Percussion & Celesta (as heard in The Shining)
Divertimento for String Orchestra

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
Violin Concerto No.1
Violin Concerto No.2

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
Romanian Folk Dances (as heard in Escaflowne)
Dance Suite (awesome piece)
Hungarian Pictures
Two Pictures
Romanian Dance

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
Concerto for Orchestra
The Miraculous Mandarin Suite (not entire ballet)

Some other requests:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
Glazunov's Saxophone Concerto

[Only registered and activated users can see links] le_Year_1919_Suite.rar
Shostakovich's The Fall of Berlin and The Unforgettable Year 1919 Suite

Let me know if there are any problems with the rars or mp3s.

edit: Thanks for spotting that, Tsobanian.

Tsobanian
08-22-2008, 05:30 AM
Thanks man for the Shostakivich and Bartok orchestral works!

apropos of what you posted, the Miraculous Mandarin Suite is on the 5th disc
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

kingnazgul
08-22-2008, 08:20 AM
Wow, the floodgates are starting to open on this thread. Thanks for the great posts.

Do you have Turn of the Screw by Britten, perhaps?

Luisfer
08-22-2008, 05:00 PM
Awesome thread and rare musical material. Many thanks for this.

streichorchester
08-24-2008, 01:32 AM
No, sorry. I don't have any of Britten's Operas, not even Peter Grimes (in its entirety, that is.) I'm more an orchestral/ballet/oratorio person with very specific operatic tastes:

Prokofiev - Love for Three Oranges
Shostakoivch - Lady Macbeth of Mstensk
Vaughan Williams - The Pilgrim's Progress
Wagner - Der Ring des Nibelungen
Poulenc - Les Dialogues des Carmelites

I have some others, but those are my favourites.

kingnazgul
08-24-2008, 02:41 AM
I prefer orchestral works myself, especially concertante, but I love 20th century opera as well. In any case, do you have any Hindemith? I'd like to get a hold of Kammermusik.

The Pilgrim's Progress would be a good addition as well.

Cristobalito2007
08-24-2008, 03:11 AM
May I ask, does anyone have William Walton's Symphony 2? Or his Troilus and Cressida Suite? They are both quite energetic and cinematic I thought.
Thanks!

Dharma
08-24-2008, 06:14 PM
I'd like to get some of Myaskovsky's symphonies if at all possible. Or even just one. I have his 3rd, 5th, 21st, 22nd, and 27th symphonies but would love any others you or anyone else could provide.

streichorchester
08-24-2008, 11:10 PM
I prefer orchestral works myself, especially concertante, but I love 20th century opera as well. In any case, do you have any Hindemith? I'd like to get a hold of Kammermusik.

The Pilgrim's Progress would be a good addition as well.

I don't have any of Hindemith's operas or Kammermusik, but I do have Mathis der Maler, Metamorfosís Sinfonica, and Nobilissima Visione. I've been meaning to pick up his chamber works, but it's just another thing on the list.

I will upload Vaughan Williams's The Pilgrim's Progress, Walton's Symphony No. 2. I didn't know there was a suite from Troilus and Cressida so I'm going to add that to the list of things to find too.

Dharma: Have you heard Myaskovsky's 6th? That's the only one I have at the moment.

Cristobalito2007
08-25-2008, 05:33 AM
Dear Streich
Yes please, I would be very grateful for Walton 2. I think I can get the Troilus and Cressida Suite from a friend. I think the forum would love either a suite or complete. Its amazing.
I have Myaskovsky's 24th and 25th if anyone wants it?


I don't have any of Hindemith's operas or Kammermusik, but I do have Mathis der Maler, Metamorfosís Sinfonica, and Nobilissima Visione. I've been meaning to pick up his chamber works, but it's just another thing on the list.

I will upload Vaughan Williams's The Pilgrim's Progress, Walton's Symphony No. 2. I didn't know there was a suite from Troilus and Cressida so I'm going to add that to the list of things to find too.

Dharma: Have you heard Myaskovsky's 6th? That's the only one I have at the moment.

1337
08-25-2008, 07:59 AM
Streich I'm very interested in hearing the Myaskovsky symphonies, please upload the 6th symphony and also the Mathis der Maler symphony if possible.

Cristobalito2007, could you also upload the Myaskovsky 24th and 25th?

thanks alot.

Cristobalito2007
08-25-2008, 10:29 AM
Myaskovsky 24th and 25th

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Its at 128kbps. Sorry, thats how I found it. Its a nice recording though.


Streich I'm very interested in hearing the Myaskovsky symphonies, please upload the 6th symphony and also the Mathis der Maler symphony if possible.

Cristobalito2007, could you also upload the Myaskovsky 24th and 25th?

thanks alot.

streichorchester
08-25-2008, 05:39 PM
I'm beginning to regret not downloading that complete Myaskovsky symphony cycle from avaxhome before it was shut down. If someone was up to it, they could do a google search for "myaskovsky complete symphonic works rapidshare" and find those txt files that link to the rars.

Here's Vaughan Williams's opera A Pilgrim's Progress which he based his Symphony No. 5 on. The Walton Symphony is going to take a little longer to compress and upload because it's >300 megs.

[Only registered and activated users can see links] ar
[Only registered and activated users can see links] ar

V1138
08-25-2008, 08:57 PM
Does anyone have any recordings of Der ring das Nibelungen? I hear the Solti recording is the best, but that's near $200 for something I've never heard, so I really just want to get taste of the Ring Cycle. If anyone can help, I'd appreciate it.

streichorchester
08-25-2008, 11:36 PM
Does anyone have any recordings of Der ring das Nibelungen? I hear the Solti recording is the best, but that's near $200 for something I've never heard, so I really just want to get taste of the Ring Cycle. If anyone can help, I'd appreciate it.

It's too large for me to upload, but the Solti one is the most commonly posted recording of it if you can find it through google. Just try including tags like rapidshare, megaupload, sendspace, etc.

V1138
08-26-2008, 06:13 AM
Thanks, I'll try that!

Sanico
08-26-2008, 09:01 AM
Does anyone have any recordings of Der ring das Nibelungen? I hear the Solti recording is the best, but that's near $200 for something I've never heard, so I really just want to get taste of the Ring Cycle. If anyone can help, I'd appreciate it.

Solti recording is definitely the best of all the Ring recordings made.
You can get Solti recording of the Ring on this torrent:
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

And you can also listen the Ring best orchestral parts, that will keep you entertained, while you're downloading the full Solti recording.
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Have a good listen.

streichorchester
08-26-2008, 01:02 PM
William Walton - Symphony No. 2 and Violin Concerto
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Hindemith - Symphonic Metamorphosis, Nobilissima Visione, and Mathis der Maler
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Next up is Myaskovsky's 6th.

JohnGalt
08-26-2008, 03:14 PM
Thanks very much for those Bartok starters. Absolutely wonderful stuff! :)

Cristobalito2007
08-26-2008, 03:16 PM
Thank you very very kindly for these. I'm sure I will enjoy immensely, as will everyone. Thanks again.


William Walton - Symphony No. 2 and Violin Concerto
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Hindemith - Symphonic Metamorphosis, Nobilissima Visione, and Mathis der Maler
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Next up is Myaskovsky's 6th.

streichorchester
08-26-2008, 04:56 PM
As discussed in another thread, here's a collection of classical pieces heard in James Horner's score to Willow:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Bartok's Cantata Profana - III. There Was Once An Old Man. Moderato (heard in the choral parts without lyrics, fastforward to 1:45)

Grieg - Peer Gynt - 12 - Arab Dance (heard on various occasions in Willow and Once Upon a Forest)

Janacek - Glagolitic Mass - IV. Veruju (Credo) (also heard in the choral parts without lyrics, fastforward to 3:21)

Le Mystere des Voix Bulgares - 11. Mir Stanke Le "Harvest Song From Thrace" (Willow's theme played by a shakuhachi, probably one of the most blatant ripoffs of Horner's career)

Prokofiev - October Revolution Cantata - VI. Revolution (the loud horn parts are used for Bavmorda's theme/motif)

Rachmaninov - Symphony No. 1 - I. Grave - Allegro ma non troppo (the source of Horner's infamous 4-note danger motif)

Schumann's Symphony no. 3 "Rhenish" - I. Lebhaft - vivace (heard in Escape from the Tavern)

Also, smaller bits from Alexander Nevsky (Battle on the Ice) and Mahler's Symphony No. 1 (the low rising line in the cellos/basses at the beginning of the first movement) can be heard. I have a note about Mozart's Requiem making an appearance, but I can't remember where at the moment.

edit: oh yeah, the opening of track 08 - Willow the Sorcerer is Mozart's Requiem

kingnazgul
08-27-2008, 04:34 AM
Thanks for the Hindemith!

This is probably a shot in the dark, but do you have Messiaen's Réveil des oiseaux (Or any of his birdsong works) and/or Crumb's Vox Balanae?

Cristobalito2007
08-28-2008, 04:43 AM
Thanks Streich for the Willow - Classical. I'm very excited to hear this.

streichorchester
08-28-2008, 05:09 AM
Myaskovsky's Symphony No. 6 with an awesome choral ending:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

kingnazgul: Sorry, I don't have very many works by Messiaen or Crumb. That's sort of getting into the late 20th century expressionist/avant-garde sound that I can only listen to in small doses.

Here are the works I have by Messiaen:
Quartet for the End of Time
Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum
Chronochromie
La Ville d'en haut
Éclairs sur l'Au-Delà...
Illuminations of the Beyond
Turangalila Symphonie
and the stuff on the 2001 soundtrack

By Crumb I only have Black Angels by the Kronos Quartet.

Sanico
08-28-2008, 06:34 AM
Does someone have Gustav Holst The Planets? Especially the André Previn recording?
I actually have the Herbert von Karajan recordind, released by the Deutsche Grammophon, but i read some bad reviews who told that, this is not the best of all the recordings of The Planets.

1337
08-28-2008, 06:55 AM
Sanico, I don't have the Previn recording of the suite, but I do have a recording by James Levine and I must say that the "Mars" movement is quite electrifying.

let me know if you're interested in the Levine recording.

kingnazgul
08-28-2008, 09:45 AM
kingnazgul: Sorry, I don't have very many works by Messiaen or Crumb. That's sort of getting into the late 20th century expressionist/avant-garde sound that I can only listen to in small doses.





That's what I was thinking, but I figured I'd give it a shot.

Do you have the entire versions of Bartok's Cantata Profana and Prokofiev's October Revolution Cantata?

By the way, I think it is so much fun trying to pick out where Horner gets his material.

1337
08-28-2008, 10:46 AM
I've been listening to the Myaskovsky symphonies that have been uploaded here and I must say the the music is INCREDIBLE. Does anybody have his cello concerto in C minor (Op. 66)?

streichorchester, do you happen to have the cello concerto?

streichorchester
08-28-2008, 12:48 PM
Yep, I have the Cello Concerto and Cantata Profana and October Revolution Cantata.

Tsobanian
08-28-2008, 01:34 PM
Yep, I have the Cello Concerto and Cantata Profana and October Revolution Cantata.


Brother, any chances for these?
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

streichorchester
08-28-2008, 02:46 PM
[Only registered and activated users can see links] - yes, I downloaded this from emusic

[Only registered and activated users can see links] - not this recording, but I have both pieces

[Only registered and activated users can see links] - I have the Gadfly but not Five Days - Five Nights Suite, instead it's coupled with Hamlet

[Only registered and activated users can see links] - yes, I have this CD sitting on my desk most of the time

Tsobanian
08-28-2008, 03:49 PM
[Only registered and activated users can see links] - yes, I downloaded this from emusic

[Only registered and activated users can see links] - not this recording, but I have both pieces

[Only registered and activated users can see links] - yes, I have this CD sitting on my desk most of the time



I'd like to have the combination Neeme Järvi + Prokofiev.
Plus "The Year 1941", Op. 90

Sanico
08-28-2008, 04:36 PM
Sanico, I don't have the Previn recording of the suite, but I do have a recording by James Levine and I must say that the "Mars" movement is quite electrifying.

let me know if you're interested in the Levine recording.
Yes I am.
Thanks for taking your time.

And if someone else, have more Planets recordings, please don't hesitate to upload it, if you can.
It will be greatly appreciated.

1337
08-28-2008, 07:58 PM
Sanico, uploading the planets now. Will update this post when it finishes

EDIT: Gustav holst; The Planets Suite (James Levine) ([Only registered and activated users can see links])

streichorchester, could you please upload the Myaskovsky cello concerto? thanks so much again!

PS: and also the Kabalevsky cello concertos and the Lalo cello concerto if possible.

streichorchester
08-29-2008, 01:41 AM
Prokofiev's Cantata for the 20th Anniversary of the October Revolution is my favourite piece by Prokofiev, narrowly beating out the Symphony No. 5 and Alexander Nevsky. In a sense, you can think of it as a combination of those two: powerful choruses, highly motivic development, and what I believe is the culmination of the Russian colourist period that began with Borodin and Mussorgsky, and ended with Shostakovich.

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Some interesting things to watch for:

02 - The Philosophers: as heard in Horner's score to Red Heat
05 - Interlude: I made a mistake including the Revolution track in the Willow collection, since this is actually where Bavmorda's theme came from
06 - Revolution: This track is very powerful as it depicts the gunfire, sirens, and Stalin's call to arms during the Russian revolution
07 - Victory: as heard in Horner's The Land Before Time
09 - Symphony: this is Prokofiev at his best, writing much in the same style as the Symphony No. 5 and filmscores/ballets

Also included on the CD are excerpts from The Stone Flower ballet.

1337: I don't have the Lalo. Actually, I don't have anything by Lalo, probably because I hear him all the time on the radio. Him and Max Bruch, for some reason. They kind of fall into the catagory of "concertos everyone likes, but what else did they write?" Kabalevsky, on the other hand, I'm sure everyone would love his Requiem if I could only find it somehow.

1337
08-29-2008, 02:33 AM
i see... I'm looking for the Lalo cello concerto but too bad you don't have it. I'll look forward to the Myaskovsky cello concerto.

Tsobanian
08-29-2008, 03:01 AM
Prokofiev's Cantata for the 20th Anniversary of the October Revolution is my favourite piece by Prokofiev, narrowly beating out the Symphony No. 5 and Alexander Nevsky. In a sense, you can think of it as a combination of those two: powerful choruses, highly motivic development, and what I believe is the culmination of the Russian colourist period that began with Borodin and Mussorgsky, and ended with Shostakovich.

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]


Thanks!!!!
For those who want it, you'll find the booklet of the recording here
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

1337
08-29-2008, 03:51 AM
streichorchester, I just downloaded the Prokofiev Cantata, magnificent stuff!

I can't believe how much of Horner's music is RIPPED from classical music, its no wonder the Land before Time score was so good... didn't realize he had stolen so many melodies.

Tsobanian
08-29-2008, 04:34 AM
And if someone else, have more Planets recordings, please don't hesitate to upload it, if you can.
It will be greatly appreciated.


I have this one, but unfortunately the mp3-bitrate is 128Kbps.
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

crusaderofhonor
08-29-2008, 08:17 AM
It's been awhile since I've been on, but thanks so much for the Philip Glass pieces. I enjoy them immensely.

Cristobalito2007
08-29-2008, 10:29 AM
Also check out Romeo and Juliet, Act 1 - The Fight and The Duel, both are used extensively in Star trek III and Willow (Escape from the Cavern), and later by Joel McNeely in Attack of the Mechanical Wasps in Avengers remake.

Also, Ivan the Terrible, track Ivan Appeals to the Boyras makes up the base notes for the main choral theme in Glory. You cant miss it.


streichorchester, I just downloaded the Prokofiev Cantata, magnificent stuff!

I can't believe how much of Horner's music is RIPPED from classical music, its no wonder the Land before Time score was so good... didn't realize he had stolen so many melodies.

kingnazgul
08-29-2008, 11:35 AM
Also check out Romeo and Juliet, Act 1 - The Fight and The Duel, both are used extensively in Star trek III and Willow (Escape from the Cavern), and later by Joel McNeely in Attack of the Mechanical Wasps in Avengers remake.

Also, Ivan the Terrible, track Ivan Appeals to the Boyras makes up the base notes for the main choral theme in Glory. You cant miss it.


Horner also uses the Morning Serenade in the 3rd scene of the 3rd act of Romeo and Juliet in The Land Before Time, not to mention the dozen or so references to Peter and the Wolf.

By the way, thanks for the cantata Streichorchester.

herbaciak
08-29-2008, 12:17 PM
October Revolution Cantata is awesome! Thanks! And speaking of Russians - maybe U have got something by Rimsky-Korsakov? Anything except for Sheherezada because I know it better than my own pocket:).

streichorchester
08-29-2008, 01:25 PM
Maybe I'll make another package in a bit, but for now here's the The Land Before Time list of classical sources:

Bartok's The Wooden Prince (opening)
Bartok's Piano Concerto No. 3 (second movement) (incidental probably since it sounds a lot like Prokofiev's October Revolution Cantata)
Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet (Interlude, Morning Serenade - both from Act III)
Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf (march and the fight with the wolf)
Prokofiev's October Revolution Cantata
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 10 (first movement) (incidental probably)
Mahler's Symphony No. 1 (first movement)
Debussy's Les Nocturnes (Nuages)

abbott456
08-29-2008, 05:34 PM
hey im looking for the "Planets" im pretty sure its a 8 part somehting anouther I forgot who composed it but that should be in your time period.

streichorchester
08-29-2008, 05:57 PM
Here are Kabalevsky's two cello concertos and Symphonic Poem: Vesna from this Naxos CD: [Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

The Myaskovsky concerto is paired with the Prokofiev in a lossless flac file so it's going to take me a while to compress and upload.

ShqKa
08-29-2008, 06:18 PM
Hey boys, i am violinist (9th year)

I suggest you to listen these musics (they are the best songs that i own) :

Brahms - Hungarian dance no 5, No 1, No 2, No 4

Beethoven - 7th Symphony - 2nd Movement - Allegretto

Chopin- Impromptu nº4, Fantaisie

Chopin - Waltz Op. 64.1 in D flat major - Minute

Chostakovich - Waltz 2 from Jazz Suite

Chopin - Op.69 No.1, Waltz in A flat major

Dvorak - Symphony no. 9 of the new world - 4 Allegro con fuoco


Tchaikovsky - Piano Concerto No.1, Allegro

All seasons of Vivaldi

Beethoven - 9th Symphony - Ode a la joie

Chopin - 07 - Waltz Op. 64.2 in C sharp minor

Debussy_Reverie

Listen em on Youtube you will see how are they Fantastic

1337
08-29-2008, 07:52 PM
hey im looking for the "Planets" im pretty sure its a 8 part somehting anouther I forgot who composed it but that should be in your time period.

Look a few post above you... I've uploaded Holst's suite conducted by Levine. Theres also another recording at P.Q.P Bach.org

streichorchester, Thanks alot for the Kabalevsky Cello concertos. I love his music, its always cheerful. Just wondering if you have his piano concertos? if so, which recordings are they?

EDIT: Does anyone have Roy Harris' 3rd symphony? I've been hearing lots of good things about this piece from some forum.

streichorchester
09-01-2008, 11:48 PM
Rostropovich plays:

Prokofiev - Sinfonia Concertante
Myaskovsky - Cello Concerto
Rachmaninov - Vocalise

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

arthierr
09-02-2008, 12:01 AM
Streich, in your post about Kanno [Only registered and activated users can see links] you say this :


It is the near-pinnacle of orchestral achievement to sound like Prokofiev, Copland, Ravel, etc. but Kanno can accomplish this with such ease. It is only one step down from the top tier: Mahler (whom is strangely absent from Kanno's long list of sources.)

Is Mahler's music so great ? And if it's case, could you upload a selection of his music for the neophyte ?

streichorchester
09-02-2008, 01:35 AM
Mahler and his work was one of my main areas of study in university, so here's a semi-short bio:

Mahler is generally considered to be the ultimate evolution of the symphonic form that began with Haydn, Mozart, and continued through Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, and Bruckner. But he took things one step further and combined this "absolute" musical form with programmatic ideas of operatic proportions; his biggest influence being Wagner. He was the end of the "first Viennese school," but didn't come into mainstream popularity until Leonard Bernstein regularly performed concerts of his works. Now any major orchestra worth their salt performs a Mahler symphony at least once a season, the most common one being the ever-popular fifth (the first one I heard.)

Mahler's symphonies are usually 1 to 1.5 hours long and are always scored for huge ensembles. Even the trombone-less fourth is massive, not in size, but in content. Mahler takes you for emotional rides employing funeral marches, ländler (kind of a like a folk waltz), German lieder, and extra long scherzos that show off his amazing ability to juggle 3-4 contrapuntal lines at once.

There are the recurring themes of nature, death, and the innocence of childhood in Mahler's music. He always feared death, and many say he predicted three fates in his "tragic" Symphony No. 6 where he uses a massive hammer blow to the stage to represent 1) his being fired from directing the Vienna opera due to pre-war antisemitism, 2) the death of his daughter due to fever, 3) his own early death due to a bad heart. He is a tragic figure, and shortly after his death his beloved wife Alma (who regularly cheated on him) was an unreliable authority on his life and work, but the only authority there was.

Mahler actually didn't care much for religion, and like many Jews living in the German empire converted to Lutheranism. He was a deist like most composers in that he believed in a God-like power that ruled over nature and the universe and man. His Symphony No. 2 "Resurrection" is not religious in nature at all, despite what many (Christians) would tell you. It was simply a ode to the death of a friend and the best way he knew how to cope with it. Similarly, though his Symphony No. 8 "Symphony of a Thousand" (which employs a large 200 person orchestra and 800 person chorus) begins with a choral outburst of "Veni Creator Spiritus" in Latin, it goes on to the story of Goethe's Faust for the majority of the symphony.

Mahler wrote 9 symphonies, an unfinished 10th that others have attempted to complete, a symphony-like cycle called Das Lied von der Erde, and several lieder in the style of Schubert and Hugo Wolf. Since Beethoven, Schubert, and Bruckner all died before they could write a 10th symphony, Mahler feared writing the 9th hence the reason Das Lied is not considered one of his symphonies.

I could go on to break down each of his symphonies, but I'll save that for if and when I get to posting them. You can hear Mahler influences in composers such as Arnold Shoenberg, Anton Webern, Leonard Bernstein, Dmitri Shostakoivch, James Horner, and pretty much wherever there is ingenious motivic development. The thing about the scores is that they're the most detailed scores you've ever seen, with an articulation or performance indication on practically every note, which causes extra-long rehearsals. But the effect is great and you can hear every solo instrument, every combination of instruments, and every section reaching their full potential.

Here's a short list with descriptions in case any of them interest you in particular:

Symphony No. 1
Mahler shows his love of nature through the German lieder he wrote and turns it into a symphony with a dance, a funeral procession, and a massive grand finale where the horn section is told to hold their instruments in the air.

Symphony No. 2 "Resurrection"
This one is darker in tone as it begins with a funeral procession*, a light-hearted, yet deceiving dance, a huge scherzo again based on his lieder, a song, and an operatic finale with chorus.

*As with most of Mahler's music, it's difficult to describe a single movement as being one thing like a funeral procession or dance. While it might begin one way, it is always evolving into something else, and the genius lies in Mahler's ability to interweave several contrasting ideas.

Symphony No. 3
This symphony is almost 2 hours long, but every movement is like its own little symphony. In this Mahler explores mountains, flowers, animals, man, and love. You really have to hear it to get the full effect.

Symphony No. 4
This one is not as massive as the first three, but it carries an important message of death and heaven. Originally Mahler wrote a song about heaven for the end of the Symphony No. 3, but felt it would work better on its own. So he took material from the song and made three movements out of it, then put the song at the end. Genius. Listen for death playing the fiddle in the scherzo.

Symphony No. 5
This is the most popular of Mahler's symphonies, and for good reason. It begins with a fanfare and march full of memorable themes, then another march, then a scherzo, then a heart-wrenching adagio (the famous Adagietto), and a massive ending based on another song Mahler wrote. Since in Mahler's time it was still considered strange to write war-like music for the concert hall, it is thought that this symphony predicts the coming world wars. Indeed, if you wrote this kind of music in the early 1900s people would be wondering what was wrong with you and wonder why you're so violent. Funny enough, Mahler did feel himself unbalanced enough to regularly visit with Sigmund Freud.

Symphony No. 6 "Tragic" (in A minor)
Almost as if to cash in on the success of the fifth, Mahler wrote this one much in the same way. The march at the beginning is memorable, but something new emerges and that's the idea of "fate" (using an A major chord crescendoing to an A minor chord, then fading out.) There are many themes in this one, including a theme for Alma, and as I said earlier, the hammer blows in the third movement represent Mahler's struggle against fate. The finale movement is quick and sounds like something out of a movie score (reusing themes from the first three movements.)

Symphony No. 7
This one is not generally liked by Mahler enthusiasts because it seems like more of the same. The opening march is not particularly likable, but it's still genius in orchestration and development. Mahler again plays with the idea of a central "scherzo", but the biggest draw is the Wagner-like finale.

Symphony No. 8 "Symphony of a Thousand"
This symphony is glorious because you have two separate choirs, 4 soloists, and a children's choir dueling out their contrapuntal lines against the orchestra. It's very hard to follow along with the score and you wonder how a human could have written such a thing. It's epic, but also thematically intricate. Mahler is one of the only composers who can have 1000 people performing one minute, and the next minute 1 or 2. This is also the origin of the famous Schindler's List theme (which Horner used in Balto, Apollo 13, and Enemy at the Gates.)

Das Lied von der Erde (for two solo vocalists and orchestra)
Mahler gets philosophical on us in writing about the beauty of life and nature based on Hans Bethge's volume of Chinese poetry. There are many themes, but the main attraction is the beauty of the sound. Except for the opening movement, this isn't your usual dosage of funeral marches and dances and scherzos. But to many people, this is their favourite Mahler piece.

Symphony No. 9
Mahler didn't live to see this performed, but many feel he made peace with the world by the end of it. It is similar in some respects to Bruckner's 9th, ending with a long and tear-jerking adagio. The off-rhythm opening is said to represent Mahler's failing heart, and the middle lander has some funky time signatures as well.

Symphony No. 10
Only the first movement and middle "purgatorio" section was completed, but from sketches of the other movements scholars have attempted to recreate Mahler's world, including the melancholic ending where large drums represent the funeral of a fireman Mahler heard outside his New York apartment window one morning.

arthierr
09-02-2008, 02:00 AM
Once again I trust your taste. I quite appreciated the compilation of Vaughan Williams music you posted. What I'm looking for in a first step (and many people in this forum also would like it) is an introductory selection of his music to start with,to give you the envy to hear the full thing later.

streichorchester
09-03-2008, 07:52 PM
Mahler's Symphony No. 5 in c# minor (that's <strike>7</strike> 4 sharps!)
Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

(note: if you're having trouble extracting the first movement because of its absurdly long filename, try extracting it to your root C:\)

This symphony is generally considered to be the most representative of Mahler's style. It's 5 movements (Mahler was fond of breaking traditional symphonic form and adding an extra movement or two) but split into 3 parts:

Part 1

I. Trauermarsche
It all begins with a fanfare for solo trumpet that was foreshadowed in the Symphony No. 4. Mahler was frightened, if not a bit fascinated with death, and loved to begin his symphonies with a march in a minor key representative of a funeral procession. In true sonata-allegro form, the secondary theme appears around 1:20. Notice how Mahler plays with dynamics, switching between f and p for emotional effect. Where the classical symphony calls for a direct repeat of the primary and secondary themes, Mahler returns to the primary and then secondary in variation. Keep in mind that every little bit of instrumental ornamentation is its own motif that is heard throughout the movement in different voices and variations.

6:10 is the beginning of the development section, and though it hints at snippets of the trumpet fanfare, the theme here is new. The fast-moving violins and winds will also play a role in the final movement. At 7:47 there is a climax that marks the return of the primary theme. The secondary theme returns at 8:55, and Bernstein takes this really slow. The trumpet theme is played in the solo timpani at 11:00 marking the end of the development and the beginning of the coda. There is another climax at 12:50 that again leads into the fanfare, and then the end.

II. Sturmisch bewegt (moving "stormingly" or "stormishly")
The opening movement wasn't exactly an allegro, so this is essentially a continuation of the idea of symphonic formality. The falling winds at 1:15 also will play a role in the final movement. At 1:35 a kind of variation plays on the funeral march from the previous movement while the winds play this neat motif figure over and over. It gets somewhat "romantic" like something Rachmaninov would write, but before too long returns to the quick, Wagner-ish action it opened with. At 4:25 a haunting solo for the cellos plays over a quiet timpani roll until 5:50 when the funeral march returns and things get more agitated. Here we can also hear foreshadowing of some ideas that will appear in the Adagietto and Symphony No. 6.

At 8:40 the orchestration begins to sound like John Williams in that the voices are all over the place, and when the funeral march returns take notice of everything else that is going on motivically. Each sound is found earlier in the movement and maybe has to be seen in the score to be appreciated for its complexity. At 11:00 a variation in the solo cello melody is heard with some awesome counterpoint in the trombones. At 12:00 things get very Wagner-ian as it wraps up Part 1 with a brass chorale and fanfare; a very awesome moment. If you didn't know better, you might have thought this was the ending. But those wind runs interject yet again and the agitation persists. There is some more foreshadowing of the 6th, and a familiar motif ends the movement.

Part 2

III. Scherzo
The scherzos are really where Mahler's orchestration shines, as if it hasn't shone enough by now. Here he plays with dance-like melodies in triple-metre, but this movement is like its own self-contained, little symphony complete with allegros, adagios, and a grand finale. Notice a little bit of fugal writing between the top and bottom strings. There is also a little quoting of the "devil's violin" from the 4th symphony's scherzo. 2:40 is the beginning of the secondary theme which takes after the German ländler. Mahler's dance music always gives the impression he could have made it big as an alternative to Johann Strauss, but Mahler instead tells a story with the music which is why it can never seem to settle down. It's always going places, always developing, and any indication of a dance is to establish the rural setting for which the story takes place.

5:05 is the beginning of a new theme (B) that is almost Slovakian in nature since the harmonies are not your typical candential-Germanic. This is the style of Mahler's "Wunderhorn lieder", the songs he wrote before the symphonies about nature, man, and death. 5:45 is the first climax of the scherzo (Mahler's scherzos often have this sort of "moment of resolution" over a pedal.) The horn solo here is tragic and very lovely. At 7:20, the strings imitate a mandolin or some kind of guitar used for folk dances. The interchanging themes almost make you think there are two dances going on at the same time. And what else could 9:20 represent but a harsh German winter? The "lieder" continues on at 10:08 in the horns, and you can almost imagine a baritone singing that line.

10:40 is an interesting return to the quick dance as it becomes more waltz-like than ländler. As things become more agitated there is more motivic development of ideas heard at the beginning of the movement until 11:50 when there is a complete return to the beginning (A') and the dance develops more. At 14:15 all of a sudden we're back in the B section of the scherzo with the lieder singing over some new harmonies. This doesn't last long as the dance takes over once again. The buildup at 15:45 is great and reminiscent of Holst (who actually came later.)

16:00 marks the beginning of a neat effect while the song in the horn tries to play out, but it is interrupted by the dance. If you want to get metaphorical, the dance is moving forward quickly into the new century while the slow song of the wise old man is holding things back as if to warn about the future. 18:11 to the end is quite a rush as Mahler brings back the themes from earlier and resolves them with a fanfare.

Part 3

IV. Adagietto
There isn't much to say about this except it is scored for only strings and harp and is one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever written, and was used in the film Death in Venice. It often draws comparisons with Barber's Adagio for Strings in the use of chromatic harmonies to pull and release. There is some foreshadowing of the adagio in the 6th. If you like this sort of music from Mahler, also check out the final movement from the 3rd, the adagio movement from the 4th, the adagio from the 6th, the adagio finale from the 9th, and the opening movement of the 10th (the last thing Mahler wrote that wasn't just sketches.) Many of the themes in this movement will return for the 5th and final movement.

V. Rondo-Finale
In sharp contrast to the seriousness of what preceded it, this movement starts off very playful in the manner of Mahler's first symphony. Again we hear some "Wunderhorn" lieder and some fugal interplay in the strings. The Symphony No. 5 also marks the end of Mahler's basing his symphonies on the songs he wrote, or what are known as the "Wunderhorn symphonies." As with each of the first 5 of Mahler's symphonies, the light-hearted tone of the final movement represents victory and the celebration of life. It is the 6th that is the bleakest and more representative of death. This movement moves along quite quickly and uninterrupted as it reiterates some ideas from the adagio over the double-bowing cellos. A neat aspect of this is that with each incarnation of the theme, it changes key. It's almost as if Mahler couldn't yet allow things to end, so he'd begin anew in a new key.

At 9:00 things begin to sound as though they're wrapping up as it builds to the final variation of the song. There is even more fugul interplay over a rolling timpani in a kind of extended build up to the end. At 11:10 things are interrupted briefly for some great stringless wind playing. What's great about Mahler is that one minute the entire orchestra is chugging along, then suddenly a wind octet or some other chamber ensemble takes over. It really adds to the "bigness" of the sound by drawing this contrast between formal styles. 13:49 is a glorious brass choral of 1812 Overture proportions. I don't know how he does it, but Mahler always manages to find the best harmonies to end a symphony with (see the ending chorals from the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 7th, and 8th.) At 14:48 the wind runs here heard back in the 2nd movement are a nice touch, and a great way to have the winds do something without being overpowered by the brass.

And that's all there is to it. Many of the best orchestrations of all time within one symphony. You could spend a lifetime analyzing the score, and no one has come close in classical or film music to matching the ingenuity of the motivic development herein.

Dharma
09-03-2008, 10:43 PM
Mahler's Symphony No. 5 in c# minor (that's 7 sharps!)

Actually it's only 5 in concert pitch. You're thinking of C# Major. :P

Anyway thanks for the Myaskovsky stuff several posts ago. :)

streichorchester
09-03-2008, 11:28 PM
Actually it's only 5 in concert pitch. You're thinking of C# Major. :P

Anyway thanks for the Myaskovsky stuff several posts ago. :)


We're both wrong, it's 4 sharps (7 minus 3) but who's counting? :D I don't know what I was thinking of. Anyway, thanks for catching my error.

A neat theory about the 5th is that it's connected to the 9th by its key signature. The 5th begins in C# minor and ends in D major, whereas the 9th begins in D major and ends in Db minor (the enharmonic equivalent of C# minor.)

arthierr
09-04-2008, 04:35 AM
Mahler's Symphony No. 5 in c# minor (that's 7 sharps!)
Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Thank you very much.

I was eager to listen to this composer since I red your comment. As you know I'm an orchestra junkie, addicted to grand, symphonic music for full orchestra. Mahler is one of these composers I totally missed. Glad to discover him thanks to you.

Thanks also for the analysis, it considerably accelerates the period of introduction and improves the appreciation of an oeuvre.

arthierr
09-04-2008, 04:47 AM
As you know I'm an orchestra junkie, addicted to grand, symphonic music for full orchestra.

Speaking of what I've just remembered that I ripped Karajan & Berliner Philharmoniker - R. Strauss, Ein Heldenleben in mp3 best quality some months ago. If someone needs it, just ask.

Tsobanian
09-04-2008, 05:55 AM
Streich, what do you have in terms of Leopold Stokowski orchestrations/orchestral trancriptions?

Anything from these?
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Tsobanian
09-04-2008, 08:47 AM
And if someone else, have more Planets recordings, please don't hesitate to upload it, if you can.
It will be greatly appreciated.

I've found another for ya: Holst Gustav : The Planets / Elgar Edward : 'Enigma' Variations : Sir Adrian Boult - London Philharmonic & London Symphony Orchestra
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Password: iceshoweronfire

streichorchester
09-04-2008, 03:36 PM
I only have the Bach Transcriptions from Naxos, but I have a CD in queue at emusic that includes some of his transcriptions of Debussy.

Tsobanian
09-05-2008, 04:18 AM
I only have the Bach Transcriptions from Naxos, but I have a CD in queue at emusic that includes some of his transcriptions of Debussy.

This one?
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

or this one?
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

1337
09-05-2008, 07:27 PM
Speaking of what I've just remembered that I ripped Karajan & Berliner Philharmoniker - R. Strauss, Ein Heldenleben in mp3 best quality some months ago. If someone needs it, just ask.


arthierr, do upload the tone poem, I'd be very grateful if you did. R. Strauss is one of my favourites

arthierr
09-05-2008, 07:30 PM
No problem. Will be done tomorrow.

arthierr
09-06-2008, 06:27 AM
arthierr, do upload the tone poem, I'd be very grateful if you did. R. Strauss is one of my favourites

Is it your birthday today ? No ? Anyway I have a great gift for you.

Karajan Herbert (von) : Master Recordings : Berliner Philharmoniker / Wiener Symphoniker - Box-Set : 10CDs - (1959 - 1979) 2008.
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Alternative version :

Strauss Richard : Ein Heldenleben, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme - Sir Simon Rattle - Berliner Philharmoniker - 2005.
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Links at the bottom.

Pass: iceshoweronfire

Happy listening!

1337
09-06-2008, 07:15 AM
Holy Scheizer!

arthierr, I do believe you have provided me the link to the Holy Grail
thanks for the treasure trove of music!!

streichorchester
09-07-2008, 03:41 PM
Richard Strauss is the one composer who gives me the most trouble getting into his music. I've heard Also sprach Zarathustra, Don Quixote, Death and Transfiguration, Der Rosenkavalier, Metamorphosen, and The Alpine Symphony many times, and they always bore me stupid. You'd think for someone who likes Wagner, Bruckner, and Mahler that Strauss would be no problem. I'm going to try Ein Heldenleben and see how that goes, maybe even write down my likes/dislikes about his style. Any other suggestions?

Solid-Ares
09-09-2008, 03:33 AM
man... now I just want to thank you for this topic.

Kreachure
09-09-2008, 10:55 AM
Hi everyone, I'm sorry if I seem to be interrupting your pretty hardcore classical thread with some silliness, but I have a special interest in popular classical themes that can be commonly heard in cartoons, TV commercials shows, movies, etc. It's always been a problem for me to acquire many of the classical pieces that I hear on TV, movies, etc. (which I know are classical and not from any particular soundtrack), simply because I don't know their names and they usually don't appear on TV credits. Many examples of what I mean can be found here:

[Only registered and activated users can see links] ([Only registered and activated users can see links]) (quite limited if you ask me :-D )

My question is, should I use this thread to post my collection and encourage others to share their popular classical music here, or should I start a new thread to do that, so that you keep managing these much more obscure requests?

Thanks for spreading the love for classical music!

arthierr
09-09-2008, 11:05 AM
This is not my thread, but I think my friend Streich would agre that if it's CLASSICAL (and only that), this is the right place.

Anyway you should wait for Streich's answer before doing so.

arthierr
09-09-2008, 11:19 AM
As discussed in another thread, here's a collection of classical pieces heard in James Horner's score to Willow:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]


Streich, you must know which is my favourite movie score : KRULL. I would be curious to hear what classical references are borrowed in this score. Could you upload the classical material Horner used for this one ?

streichorchester
09-09-2008, 01:10 PM
It's a classical music thread, so post as much classical stuff as you want. There's really no limitation on era. It'd be nice if we had some Baroque and pre-Baroque stuff posted as well since my collection is severely limited in those areas, but pop classical would be a welcome addition.

arthierr:
There is not a lot of classical ripping going on in Krull. There is a brief quote from the ending of Wagner's Gotterdammerung in Ride of the Firemares and a quote from Holst's Mars for the bad guy music. That's really it. No stolen melodies on the level of Willow or The Land Before Time.

arthierr
09-10-2008, 01:46 PM
Guys, I'm adding this for your enjoyment :

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

You'll find LOADS of interesting stuff there.

But one recommandation : BE DISCREET WITH THESE BLOG LINKS TO AVOID THEM TO BE CLOSED.

1337
09-11-2008, 08:49 AM
Once again, thanks for the links and music!

streichorchester
09-13-2008, 09:43 PM
I downloaded a whole bunch of Myaskovsky's symphonies from emusic and decided to start off with the Symphony No. 5, because hey, the 5th is usually the best and most representative of a composer's style: Beethoven, Schubert, Vaughan Williams, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Mahler, etc.

All I can say is it's not as action-packed as Shostakovich, and not as melodic as Prokofiev. It doesn't sound as Russian as the 6th, and drags through the impressionist tuttis a bit like Bax.

I can't seem to find much discussion on his work through google, and what I'm interested in is how other people might rank his symphonic output as they would Mahler's or Shostakovich's. Is the 6th really the best? I have high hopes for the 10th.

Tsobanian
09-15-2008, 03:40 AM
Streich, any chances to upload Prokofiev's "Ivan the Terrible"?
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

streichorchester
09-15-2008, 02:41 PM
Yeah, sure. I think my bandwidth resets today so I can start uploading again.

And that's the exact version I downloaded from emusic too. I have the Leonard Slatkin Voxbox one with the St. Louis Symphony, but I'm not sure I like it as much. Their Nevsky was a bit weird sounding.

streichorchester
09-17-2008, 03:35 PM
Here's Ivan the Terrible:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Tsobanian
09-17-2008, 11:49 PM
Here's Ivan the Terrible:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]


Thanks!:angel:

Scenro
09-18-2008, 12:34 AM
What are some good recomendations for symphony and easy piano music? O.o

streichorchester
09-18-2008, 09:46 AM
What are some good recomendations for symphony and easy piano music? O.o

I can recommend anything, but I would need you to tell me what kind of classical music you already like. Name some composers and/or pieces and I will suggest more along the same line.

If you're unsure as to what kind of classical music you like, you can start off at that kickassclassical.com site mentioned earlier to hear the most popular classical pieces around, or browse youtube for performances.

bigdogstalfos
09-18-2008, 01:33 PM
Do you have Brigg Fair by Delius or Molly on the Shore or Irish Tune from County Derry by Grainger?

streichorchester
09-18-2008, 03:13 PM
Sorry, I have very little Delius and nothing by Grainger.

By Delius I have:
Two Pieces for Small Orchestra
Two Aquarelles
Intermezzo from "Fennimore and Gerda"
Piano Concerto in C minor

I have stuff by Finzi too if you like English pastoral music.

bigdogstalfos
09-18-2008, 06:14 PM
Ooh, do you have Finzi's dies natalis or Intimations of Immortality?

streichorchester
09-19-2008, 03:32 PM
Nope, but that is on my wishlist at emusic. Along those lines i have Dyson's Quo Vadis and Stanford's Stabat Mater.

By Finzi I have the clarinet concerto, 5 Bagatelles (amazing piece), cello concerto, grand fantasia for piano and orchestra, ecologue for piano and strings.

Speaking of English music, I'm also looking for stuff by Constant Lambert who seems to be impossible to find.

Tsobanian
09-22-2008, 04:33 AM
Check out these Leopold Stokowski symphonic transcriptions:

The Stokowski Sound.
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[Only registered and activated users can see links]







Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition (Stokowski's version); Stravinsky: The Firebird Suite; Skryabin: Le Poeme de l'extase
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[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Tsobanian
09-22-2008, 04:55 PM
Streich, do you have Claudio Abbado conducting Mussorgsky?

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

streichorchester
09-22-2008, 05:19 PM
I have Abbado and the Berlin Philharmoniker for Pictures from 1993. That, and a Boris Godunov from 1983 conducted by Fedoseyev I think.

I don't have much Mussorgsky.

edit: I didn't know Night on Bald Mountain had a chorus! First the 1812 Overture, then Peer Gynt, now this. What's next, Also sprach Zarathustra?

Tsobanian
09-23-2008, 02:54 AM
I have Abbado and the Berlin Philharmoniker for Pictures from 1993. That, and a Boris Godunov from 1983 conducted by Fedoseyev I think.

I don't have much Mussorgsky.

edit: I didn't know Night on Bald Mountain had a chorus! First the 1812 Overture, then Peer Gynt, now this. What's next, Also sprach Zarathustra?




Yes I really didn't know that myself 'til recently.... And I really want to hear Mussorgksy's original 1867 version.

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Upon reading Gogol's classic Russian short story "St. John's Eve" in 1858, the young Modest Mussorgsky found the perfect narrative vehicle for the dark, dense musical language he was beginning to develop. The shortest night of the year, June 23, St. John's Eve is known in Russian folklore as the night in which witches and demons gather on Bald Mountain (now known as Mount Triglav, near Kiev), for a yearly "Black Mass" and devilish revelry lasting until dawn. Despite the vividness of the scenario and Mussorgsky's original realization of it in 1867, the composer struggled to cast the music in its ideal voice, off and on, for the rest of his career. It appeared unfinished in various forms, including a version with chorus meant for a ballet, as well as an operatic intermezzo. And although a few conductors in recent years, including Claudio Abbado and Esa-Pekka Salonen, have given successful performances of the original 1867 version, the one most familiar to modern audiences is the version completed in 1886 by Mussorgsky's friend, Rimsky-Korsakov, known as Night on Bald Mountain. The famous conductor Leopold Stokowski, however, was so unsatisfied with the 1886 orchestration that he traveled to Russia, studied Mussorgsky's manuscripts himself, and in 1938, prepared his own orchestration. Writing in the notes accompanying his 1954 recording of the work, Stokowski explained that Rimsky-Korsakov "had more technical skill than Mussorgsky, and so generously, and with good intentions, gave of his precious time to assist his friend." The problem, however, was that Rimsky-Korsakov "sometimes misunderstood Mussorgsky's uncompromising originality in harmony and rhythm." In other words, Rimsky-Korsakov's orchestrational skill rendered the diabolical scene altogether too tidily. Stokowski's version sought to mediate between Mussorgsky's visceral, weighty sonority and Rimsky-Korsakov's skill at instrumental balance and contrast. There is, perhaps, a natural affinity between Stokowski's orchestral sound -- which is often characterized as bombastic, vivid, with a low center of gravity, and a broadness of gesture -- and Mussorgsky's compositional style, which for Stokowski betrays an obsession with "the dark, fantastic, grotesque, mysterious, and terrifying side of life." Ultimately, however, Stokowski's more exaggerated orchestral realization of Mussorgsky's demonic fascinations serve to contrast all the more starkly the visions of dawn that end the work: the early morning church bells, the bird call of an oboe solo, and the peasant song of a lone flute. ~ All Music Guide



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Like nearly every piece Mussorgsky wrote, the compositional history of Night on Bald Mountain is convoluted to the point of near total confusion.
The work was first mentioned by the 19-year-old Mussorgsky on Christmas Day 1858 when he and his brother and a few other friends including Mussorgsky's composition teacher Mily Balakirev, proposed a three-act opera on the subject of Gogol's St. John's Eve. A year and a half later, Mussorgsky writes to Balakirev to tell him that he has been commissioned "to set to music of whole of act of [Baron] Mengden's drama The Witch depicting a witches' Sabbath on St. John's Night." There is not, however, any trace of either a commission nor a drama by Mengden called The Witch. Six years later, Mussorgsky mentions the piece again, this time as an orchestra tone-poem, in a letter dated April 20, 1866, to Balakirev: "I have started outlining the witches. Got into trouble. Satan's journey does not please me yet."
After completing the original version of the work on June 23, 1867, now called St. John's Night, that is, midsummer night, the night of the witches' Sabbath, Mussorgsky wrote the following description of the work to Rimsky-Korsakov, his friend and fellow composition student with Balakirev:
"All your favorite bits came off splendidly in the scoring. In the Black mass there is a bit in B minor (the witches glorifying Satan), thoroughly foul and barbarous....The form is rather original....The whole thing is fiery, brisk, close-knit without German transactions. In my opinion St. John's Night is something new, and ought to produce a satisfactory impression on any thinking musician."

Mussorgsky also wrote a description of the work to his friend Professor Nikolsky:
"My St. John's Night on the Bald Mountain (A far better title than The Witches) is, in form and character, Russian and original;...I wrote it very quickly[!], straight-away in full score without preliminary rough drafts, in twelve days. It seethed within me, and I worked day and night, hardly knowing what was happening within me. And now I see in my sinful prank an independent Russian product, free from German profundity and routine, and, like my Savishna (the song O Darling Savishna!), grown on our country's soil and nurtured on Russian bread.
At the head of my score I've put its contents: 1. Assembly of the witches, their talk and gossip; 2. Satan's journey; 3. Obscene praises of Satan [titled in the score Black mass]; and 4. Sabbath....The form and character of composition are both Russian and original."

The original St. John's Night is indeed wholly Russian and highly original. Compared with Rimsky's tepid reorchestration and turgid recomposition, it is an infinitely more characteristic and effective work



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The history of the composition of Night on Bald Mountain is as confused and confusing as any piece Mussorgsky ever wrote. Originally conceived as an opera on a subject from Gogol in 1858 when Mussorgsky was an army cadet of 19, re-conceived in 1860 as incidental music to a drama which apparently didn't exist, re-re-conceived as a tone poem in 1866 and completed as a tone poem in the early summer of 1867, the work was then a wholly Russian and highly original orchestral tone poem which, in Mussorgsky's words, is "free from German profundity and routine."

That was, not, however, the end of St. John's Night. Mussorgsky revised his 1867 original version in approximately 1872 as his part of the joint commission for the composers of Balakirev's Mighty Handful, the ballet opera called Mlada. This version is lost. However, it is apparently the basis of the third and final version of the work.

In the late spring of 1880, less than a year before Mussorgsky's death at 42 from alcoholism, Mussorgsky unaccountably decided to re-re-re-conceive the work as an entr'acte with bass-baritone soloist, children's choir, mixed choir, and orchestra for his opera The Sorochintsky Fair. Based on Gogol story of a devil turned out of hell who had become a drunkard, Mussorgsky apparently thought that what had been St. John's Night would work as what was in effect a dream sequence in his never-to-be-completed opera.

In a letter to his friend Vladimir Stasov, Mussorgsky describes the work which is now called The Parobok's Dream Vision (The Peasant Boy's Dream Vision):

"The parobok sleeps at the foot of a hillock...In his sleep appear to him:

1. Subterranean roar of non-human voices, uttering non-human words.

2. The subterranean kingdom of darkness comes into its own -- mocking the sleeping parobok.

3. Foreshadowing of the appearance of Chernobog (a Russian folk devil) and Satan.

4. The parobok left by the spirits of darkness. Appearance of Chernobog.

5. Worship of Chernobog and black mass.

6. Sabbath.

7. At the wildest moment of the Sabbath the sound of a Christian church bell. Chernobog suddenly disappears.

8. Suffering of the demons.

9. Voices of the clergy in church.

10. Disappearance of the demons and the parobok's awakening."

Every bit as savagely original and brutally Russian as the 1867 version, Mussorgsky's 1880 version seems not only extraneous to the plot of The Sorochintsky Fair, its size would seem too great for the opera to contain. However, since Mussorgsky never completed the opera, it is impossible to guess how The Parobok's Dream Vision might have fit into the opera








About the Overture 1812 Op. 49, I have the version with Kiev Chorus and the Children's Choir of Greater Cincinnati.
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Concerning Grieg's Peer Gynt I only have the Suites with Karajan & Berliner Philharmoniker, I really don't know what's happening in the "Peer Gynt incidental music, Op. 23"....

streichorchester
09-23-2008, 04:10 PM
Concerning Grieg's Peer Gynt I only have the Suites with Karajan & Berliner Philharmoniker, I really don't know what's happening in the "Peer Gynt incidental music, Op. 23"....

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Pieces from the Peer Gynt suite that have voice or chorus:
In the Hall of the Mountain King (too awesome)
Solveig's Song (the second time)
Arab Dance (reminds me of Borodin's Polovetsian Dances)

Also there are some neat tracks that aren't in either of the suites that are worth checking out, particularly the the Dance of the Mountain King's Daughter. I love orchestrated folk dances like that.

Tsobanian
09-24-2008, 02:46 AM
OH MAN, "In the Hall of Mountain King" with chorus was too awesome!!!!!
Thanks!!! That disc has excerpts from Grieg's Opus 23 "Peer Gynt Incidental Music"
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In the 2 suites (Opus 46 and Opus 55) the chorus is absent.




By the way the orchestra is conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen. Esa-Pekka Salonen made a recording of the original "Night on a Bare Mountain".
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Kossage
09-24-2008, 08:36 AM
Thanks for sharing Prokofiev's "Ivan the Terrible" and Mahler's "Symphony No. 5 in c# minor". Beautiful stuff. I appreciate all the efforts to let us experience and hear all these compositions. :)

1337
09-24-2008, 09:02 AM
streichorchester, do you happen to have Joseph Joachim's Violin concerto No. 2 in D minor "in the Hungarian Manner"?

bark
09-24-2008, 06:14 PM
I'd like to request:

Saint-Saens: Fantaisia for Violin and Harp, Op. 124

midi or sheet music would also be nice.

Tsobanian
09-25-2008, 06:18 AM
I'd like to request:

Saint-Saens: Fantaisia for Violin and Harp, Op. 124

midi or sheet music would also be nice.




This is what I've found.
Saint-Saëns & Ysaÿe - Rare Transcriptions for Violin & Piano - Philippe Graffin (violin) & Pascal Devoyon (piano)

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1. Saint-Saëns: Caprice brillant (1859)
2. Chopin/Saint-Saëns: Nocturne in E major, Op. 62 No. 2
3. Saint-Saëns: Caprice d’après l’Etude en forme de valse
4. Chopin/Saint-Saëns: Nocturne in E flat major, Op. 55 No. 2
5. Chopin/Ysaÿe: Waltz in E minor, Op. posth.
6. Chopin/Ysaÿe: Ballade No. 1 in G minor, Op. 23
7. Saint-Saëns: Fantaisie for violin and piano after Weber’s Oberon
8. Saint-Saëns: L’air de la pendule
9. Saint-Saëns: Fantaisie for violin and harp, Op. 124* (with harpist Catherine Beynon)





Unfortunately imslp.org does not have sheets for this Opus of Saint-Saens
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bark
09-25-2008, 08:53 AM
Wow, Tsobanian. You're good at this. Thank you.

streichorchester
09-25-2008, 01:12 PM
streichorchester, do you happen to have Joseph Joachim's Violin concerto No. 2 in D minor "in the Hungarian Manner"?

Sorry, I don't have anything by Joachim, but I'll keep an eye open for that piece since it does seem fairly popular.

Tsobanian
09-25-2008, 01:18 PM
Hey streich, this is great stuff! you might be interested.......

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streichorchester
09-25-2008, 06:20 PM
Nice find! The recordings are a little old, but it'll be nice to hear some of these things I've never heard before.

They seem to be posting a lot of stuff at that forum. Here's hoping there's a good selection of 20th century composers...

kingnazgul
09-28-2008, 02:13 PM
I was reading up on Malcolm Arnold earlier, and I came across this cd

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Anyone have anything like that, it sounds pretty interesting.

Tsobanian
09-28-2008, 05:18 PM
This post is a gem - Grieg orchestral works -.

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arthierr
09-28-2008, 05:40 PM
Hey, Tsobanian, thanks a lot, dude. Big fan of Grieg.

1337
09-28-2008, 09:01 PM
Tsobanian does it again!

Is anyone interested in Hamilton Harty's "An Irish Symphony"? Its quite a lovely pastoral piece.

streichorchester
09-28-2008, 09:42 PM
I was reading up on Malcolm Arnold earlier, and I came across this cd

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Anyone have anything like that, it sounds pretty interesting.

Villa-Lobos Harmonica Concerto: [Only registered and activated users can see links]

Arnold's stuff is always hard to find, so I don't have anything by him, sadly.

NaotaM
09-28-2008, 10:24 PM
Interesting thread. My knowledge of classical is pretty much limited to Yoko Kanno, Shadow of the Colossus.....wait, that's orchestral. Fuck, ok, so I don't know any classical. But hey, got an easy source for studying up now. Let's dive in.

NaotaM
09-29-2008, 01:44 AM
Umm, I downloaded Joly Bragas Symphony 4, and all it was was a cdimage file my pc can't read.

herbaciak
09-29-2008, 04:27 AM
Umm, I downloaded Joly Bragas Symphony 4, and all it was was a cdimage file my pc can't read.

It's an ape format. Download ape codec and will work:). And don't mount it in daemon or something, just add to winamp playlist.

Tsobanian
10-03-2008, 07:59 AM
I've found Glazunov's "King of Jews" in .flac
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FloremCripsum
10-16-2008, 10:14 PM
Hi, I've been looking through this thread, and there are some great things in here. I'm pleased to see all the Prokofiev love.

Since this is the Classical by request thread, I suppose I'll do my part and request some albums I used to have, and now have lost. First is Ravel's L'enfant et les Sortilèges (The Child and the Spells), whose loss I mourn every day. It is simply the best opera. Second is a Boston Skyline album called From the Vault: Dance Music of the High Renaissance. I have a poorly-encoded version of it (without track numbers and with several tracks missing) that I guess I'll upload, but I want more.

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It's a fabulous recording on period instruments, and it's out of print, and I miss it dearly. Can anyone help?

Sanico
10-17-2008, 03:16 PM
I'd like to request Amadeus The Complete Original Soundtrack (3 CD's).

bark
10-20-2008, 09:32 AM
I'd like to request:

Dvorak Slavonic Dance in E Minor Op 72 No 2.

Thank you for reading.

Master Killer
10-20-2008, 04:59 PM
Nifty. Most of these composers I have never heard of. Damn, I have a lot to explore in classical music. I am surprise there is no Debussy.

arthierr
10-20-2008, 07:59 PM
I'd like to request:

Dvorak Slavonic Dance in E Minor Op 72 No 2.

Thank you for reading.

Here you go :

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DarkLine
10-20-2008, 08:30 PM
The CD: Classics from the Crypt, it includes a good amount of classics... It also has a little amount of tracks...this is a request
(Thanks in advance)

arthierr
10-20-2008, 08:30 PM
I'd like to request Amadeus The Complete Original Soundtrack (3 CD's).

Here you go, Sanico :

AMADEUS Special 3 cd pack, collectors edition

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rar password: [Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

arthierr
10-20-2008, 08:46 PM
The CD: Classics from the Crypt, it includes a good amount of classics... It also has a little amount of tracks...this is a request
(Thanks in advance)

It would be a lot easier for you to look for each piece of this album individually, instead of requesting this album wich is rather rare.

guardedfromspam
10-20-2008, 10:04 PM
streichorchester: You seem to be a big Mahler fan. What is your opinion of Mahler's re-orchestration of Beethoven's 9th?

DarkLine
10-20-2008, 10:21 PM
Its actually not that rare...however I could not find pieces either, it is not that rare that it is as impossible to find as one from Japan (i.e. Most Video Game Soundtracks)

guardedfromspam
10-21-2008, 12:21 PM
Does anybody have a recording of this performer/piece?

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bark
10-21-2008, 01:44 PM
Here you go :

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Thank you so much, but I only wanted that one song. Rapidshare is taking forever to download the bundle. Unless I misunderstood and the bundle you uploaded is many version of that one song?

Sanico
10-21-2008, 06:59 PM
Here you go, Sanico :

AMADEUS Special 3 cd pack, collectors edition

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

rar password: [Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Arthierr, i dl'ed this, but it's only the 2 CD version. :-(
Do you know if exists a third link avaiable for this set, or you just found only two links?

fumoffu
10-21-2008, 09:03 PM
Arthierr, i dl'ed this, but it's only the 2 CD version. :-(
Do you know if exists a third link avaiable for this set, or you just found only two links?

It is the 3 CD version actually - the first link includes CD 1 & 2 in one .rar file. The second link includes CD 3 in a different/second .rar file (make sure you unrar the two files separately.

arthierr
10-21-2008, 09:06 PM
Sanico, it's the 2nd time I answer your requests and don't get a mere "Thanks" for that (the 1st was History of Violence). Even though this time the content isn't exactly what you expected, I need to feel a minimum appreciation from you for the time and efforts it took me to continue answer them.

Edit: Thanks, fumoffu, I was pretty sure it was the right version.

Sanico
10-21-2008, 10:26 PM
@fumoffu
You're correct. Maybe it's how the way the rar the files were named, that took me to mislead.
I'll try to do my best next time.

@arthierr
Don't worry. Even if i forgot to say a thanks for a "History of Violence", please let me know that all my answered requests by you, are really greatly appreciated. And that i will gladly answer some requests that you may need.

@all
Sorry for this inconvenience. And forgive my bad english grammar (English is not my first nature language). :-\

EDIT - Oh God, I forgot to say a thanks to arthierr for Amadeus OST.
Thank You Arthierr.


Let's back on topic and to classic music.

arthierr
10-21-2008, 11:11 PM
No problem, Sanico. Have a nice listen! :)

darkgreen_orange
10-22-2008, 12:43 PM
Hey, great thread here. I have a somewhat obscure request...Arthur Foote's Suite for Orchestra in d minor, Op. 36. It's a piece I played in orchestra looooong ago. According to our director, we were one of the only orchestras outside of Europe to ever have played this piece or something, so I absolutely understand if a recording is unavailable. :-D Thanks!

tangotreats
10-22-2008, 05:14 PM
streichorchester: You seem to be a big Mahler fan. What is your opinion of Mahler's re-orchestration of Beethoven's 9th?

Ok, I know, I'm not Streich - but I am a great advocate of Mahler, and am familiar with this arrangement.

I've always, always, questioned why it was made in the first place. Mahler remains one of the greatest orchestrators of all time - but what was the purpose of this?

He had two choices - a) Reimagine the piece in his own style. b) Do virtually nothing, just thicken up the orchestration slightly but leave it basically unchanged. It would've been interesting had he gone with the first option - although purists would have derided it, I'd quite like to hear Beethoven's 9th, as filtered through Mahler's psyche. That would be quite exciting. However, he appears to have taken the second option and basically done bugger-all. This is still Beethoven's 9th symphony - the changes are awfully pedestrian. He changed a few dynamics here and there, thickened up the woodwind compliment, and threw a Tuba into the finale. The implication is that there was something wrong with Beethoven's arrangement. Yes, the guy was deaf, but is that any reason to pee around with his symphony? Wasn't he (isn't he) recognised as one of the great geniuses of music?

I can see that this arrangement would be useful if performing at a concert where you've got a few spare woodwind players sitting around (say, for another piece in the same concert) so at least they have something to do... But it's basically pointless, and barely existant change.

It's change enough to infuriate the purists (Mahler's orchestration? Sacrilige - Beethoven's arrangement of his own symphony is obviously definitive) and change too little to excite Mahler fans. I don't see why he needs his name all over it when all he did was shift a few dynamics around and chuck a pointless extra instrument into the last movement. If I'd done it, I would have done so without credit and just published it as an additional performing version with minor orchestration tweaks.

Why it's lauded as "Mahler's Re-Orchestration" I do not know - changing a few "ff" markings into "fff" markings and copying the bassline over to another instrument is barely orchestration at all - and it's definitely not worthy of the term "re-orchestration" - implying something built from the ground up.

Beethoven's 9th is a great symphony. It's a great symphony in its original arrangement, and you won't be disappointed if you listen a performance including Mahler's tweaks... But in summary, I don't see how it has justified its own existence. :)

guardedfromspam
10-22-2008, 08:39 PM
Ok, I know, I'm not Streich - but I am a great advocate of Mahler, and am familiar with this arrangement.

I've always, always, questioned why it was made in the first place. Mahler remains one of the greatest orchestrators of all time - but what was the purpose of this?

He had two choices - a) Reimagine the piece in his own style. b) Do virtually nothing, just thicken up the orchestration slightly but leave it basically unchanged. It would've been interesting had he gone with the first option - although purists would have derided it, I'd quite like to hear Beethoven's 9th, as filtered through Mahler's psyche. That would be quite exciting. However, he appears to have taken the second option and basically done bugger-all. This is still Beethoven's 9th symphony - the changes are awfully pedestrian. He changed a few dynamics here and there, thickened up the woodwind compliment, and threw a Tuba into the finale. The implication is that there was something wrong with Beethoven's arrangement. Yes, the guy was deaf, but is that any reason to pee around with his symphony? Wasn't he (isn't he) recognised as one of the great geniuses of music?

I can see that this arrangement would be useful if performing at a concert where you've got a few spare woodwind players sitting around (say, for another piece in the same concert) so at least they have something to do... But it's basically pointless, and barely existant change.

It's change enough to infuriate the purists (Mahler's orchestration? Sacrilige - Beethoven's arrangement of his own symphony is obviously definitive) and change too little to excite Mahler fans. I don't see why he needs his name all over it when all he did was shift a few dynamics around and chuck a pointless extra instrument into the last movement. If I'd done it, I would have done so without credit and just published it as an additional performing version with minor orchestration tweaks.

Why it's lauded as "Mahler's Re-Orchestration" I do not know - changing a few "ff" markings into "fff" markings and copying the bassline over to another instrument is barely orchestration at all - and it's definitely not worthy of the term "re-orchestration" - implying something built from the ground up.

Beethoven's 9th is a great symphony. It's a great symphony in its original arrangement, and you won't be disappointed if you listen a performance including Mahler's tweaks... But in summary, I don't see how it has justified its own existence. :)

Thanks for contributing to the discussion. Your post has given my a lot to think about, and in the meantime I've actually found a copy of one of the (I think two) common recordings.

During the 20th century, as classical music has been increasingly confined to acedamia, classical musical practice and objective classical musical study have become conflated. The performer is free to interpret within the subtle and narrow constraints of the score, but certainly not to re-interpret or improvise. A book I read concerning Franz Liszt's concerts decried his practice of performing works of the past in his contemporary style and freely improvising based on the themes contained within, saying it would be "unthinkable today" and could lead only to "musical anarchy". It seems a great number of musicologists want to make classical music into an untouchable pristine museum exhibit of "authentic historical practice". Liszt would have disagreed. So, too, it seems, would Mahler.

What Mahler seems to have done is no more or less than adapt Beethoven's score to the idioms of the larger and more versatile late romantic orchestra of his day. Where there were two timpani, there are now six. Where there were two natural horns, there are now six valved french horns. (Parts are written for them that would have been physically impossible with Beethoven's horns) There are also extra doublings in the winds and the addition of bass clarinet. Finally there are some additional string doublings and counter-melodies.

If one goes into this expecting Mahler's unmistakable music fingerprint or reinterpretation on the scale of Barry Cooper's completion of the first movement of Beethoven's 10th, the work will be a great letdown. But what we really have is not so much a Mahler piece, but simply a fuller, bigger, (and in my opinion) more epic and heroic Beethoven 9th. It's probably a waste of time to try to consider what Beethoven might have done himself is he'd had Mahler's orchestra or still had his hearing when he had written the work, but to take the piece at face value, as a more grandiose version of one of the greatest pieces in the classical repertoire, I'm not sure if its existence really needs to be justified, and I'd go so far as to say I prefer it to the original. Then again, I am utterly unconcerned with musical historical accuracy for its own sake. I'd rather just hear great music. If only there was a Karajan or Bernstein recording of it!

I've I get some time later, I'll go ahead and upload it so everyone else can hear what we're talking about.

arthierr
10-22-2008, 10:15 PM
This discussion is very interesting. Could you please upload the re-orchestration so everybody here can compare?

guardedfromspam
10-22-2008, 11:12 PM
*beep* By your command!

Louie V. B.: Symphonie Nueve (Gustav Mahler Remix)

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arthierr
10-23-2008, 01:51 AM
AH! Thank you! Since I red your comments I was drooling to listen to this version.

Much appreciated. :)

1337
10-23-2008, 02:54 AM
While we're on the subject of Beethoven Remixes check out Wagner's remix of the 9th:

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[Only registered and activated users can see links]
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[Only registered and activated users can see links]

I love the album art and how Ludwie slowly moprhs into Wagner lol

arthierr
10-23-2008, 02:57 AM
Great post, thanks!

Very, very nice cover indeed. ;)

tangotreats
10-23-2008, 07:21 PM
A book I read concerning Franz Liszt's concerts decried his practice of performing works of the past in his contemporary style and freely improvising based on the themes contained within, saying it would be "unthinkable today" and could lead only to "musical anarchy". It seems a great number of musicologists want to make classical music into an untouchable pristine museum exhibit of "authentic historical practice". Liszt would have disagreed. So, too, it seems, would Mahler.


This is very true - music is, after all, something that lives and breathes. It's open to interpretation and is coloured by the people performing it.

Purism is a funny thing, because I can see its great points, and also its terrible points. People shouldn't get locked into expecting a piece of music to sound a certain way. Music isn't music until somebody plays it - that's when a bunch of academia on paper is translated into emotions by human interpreters. On the other hand, where does "meddling" around with a piece of music become *too* much?

Some conductors (Stokowski springs to mind) have been known to bugger with scores prior to performance, just because they felt like it. Stokowski, in particular, committed some terrible sins against The Planets - reorchestrating parts, adding instruments, taking them away, messing with tempi, etc - and (unforgivably) re-writing the conclusion of Neptune, so instead of fading off into nothing, it has a proper conclusion and finishes on a chord. That's going beyond interpretation, into the realm of arrogance. It's not about the music any more - it's all about the conductor. "Look what I can do!" he says - somehow thinking himself better than the person who wrote the piece.

Interpretation is possible - to quite a considerable degree - without interfering with the composer's vision. You have to at least respect the piece - I get the impression that Stokowski didn't with The Planets, for instance - as he tried to turn it into his own showpiece - but succeeded only in ruining it with horrific reorchestration that made it sound like a dodgy music hall comedy.

By contrast, Bernard Herrmann conducted The Planets in a recording which is loved by some, and hated by an equally vocal group. But it's down to interpretational difference - not intentional piss-balling with the score. Herrmann was a man of considerable ego, and made his interpretation of The Planets very much his own - but at the same time maintained respect for the original work. It's difficult.

If anybody's interested, I'll upload them. I have Herrmann's version on CD, but Stokowski's is on Vinyl - it's about time I dug it out...

Getting back to Mahler - and specifically his work on Beethoven's 9th...


But what we really have is not so much a Mahler piece, but simply a fuller, bigger, (and in my opinion) more epic and heroic Beethoven 9th.

Indeed. I find it curious that history (or popular interpretation) appears to record Mahler's work as considerably greater than it is. There is no creativity in his arrangement - it's a completely workmanlike, mostly transparent effort (as it should be) that, as you say, simply helps Beethoven fit in a little better with the concept of the late romantic symphony orchestra.


It's probably a waste of time to try to consider what Beethoven might have done himself is he'd had Mahler's orchestra or still had his hearing when he had written the work...

It's probably safe to say that, had Beethoven had access to the orchestra of Mahler's time, he would most definitely have made use of it. Throughout his life he pushed the boundaries (sometimes further than was acceptable at the time!) and almost single-handedly kick started the transition from the classical to romantic eras. Without Beethoven, there would've been no Berlioz, and without Berlioz, there would've been no Wagner, and so on. I think it's pretty much a foregone conclusion that if Ludwig had been offered this massive ensemble, he would have made the most of it, and still wanted more.

As to the hearing loss, you can certainly hear the effect it was having upon him in his later works. In a way, it made him less constrained - as his deafness developed, so his music became more brutal, extreme, and fragmentary. He stopped worrying about the practicalities of sound and concentrated on what he wanted to say. This made his music particularly hard on the ears (of the era). I wonder if his later works would've been as magnificent as they were had his struggle with deafness not happened. His BIG innovations started when his hearing loss became acute.


...but to take the piece at face value, as a more grandiose version of one of the greatest pieces in the classical repertoire, I'm not sure if its existence really needs to be justified, and I'd go so far as to say I prefer it to the original.

Oh, absolutely. I was merely musing over the extent to which the piece is still very much Beethoven's, when the implication of a term like "Gustav Mahler's 1895 Re-orchestration" is that you'd be getting something far, far different. It's certainly enough to put off the purists. You could get away with calling it a performing version for modern orchestra and it wouldn't raise an eyebrow.

I think it sounds more polished than the original, which in my eyes isn't necessarily a good thing. One of the things I like about Beethoven (particularly later works) is that exciting, "seat-of-the-pants" feeling of spontaneous excitement, as if he's thinking of it about two seconds before you're hearing it. That raw, idiosyncratic nature is part of what defines Beethoven. After the rough edges have been smoothed out, it feels a little less passionate to my ears. Though I do enjoy it from a technical perspective (there's no doubt that the changes - though minor - do create a more pleasing sound for somebody accustomed to contemporary orchestral performances) but I do feel that there has been slight loss sustained in the process.


Then again, I am utterly unconcerned with musical historical accuracy for its own sake. I'd rather just hear great music. If only there was a Karajan or Bernstein recording of it!

Well, great music needs to be preserved. Beethoven's original MUST survive. But there's nothing wrong with having a number of different impressions - as long as there is some acceptance that the original piece has the most right to exist. It may not even present the piece in its best light, but the efforts of the original composer should be remembered.

I would really like to hear a better version of this, too. The Brno Philharmonic is a good orchestra, but it's not exactly world class - in terms of performance, interpretation, and recording. Something like this really needs the deluxe treatment. I'm surprised Karajan never touched it; I would have thought it would have been a dream project for him and the Berlin Philharmonic. Imagine that...

The Wagner piano transcription of the same piece is fascinating. I was thinking about it only a week or so ago - I'd never heard it, but had read a great deal about it and was quite keen to experience it. It's surprisingly airy - this is no crazy Liszt transcription, and it's distinctly un-Wagnerian - once again, as it should be. It sounds to me like it's cutting straight to the point - which is quite a miraculous accomplishment.

Thank you to 1337 for posting it. :)

Edit: Since we're talking Beethoven, here are his complete symphonies, as performed by Karajan and the BPO.
[Only registered and activated users can see links] moniker_1962.part01.rar
[Only registered and activated users can see links] moniker_1962.part02.rar
[Only registered and activated users can see links] moniker_1962.part03.rar
[Only registered and activated users can see links] moniker_1962.part04.rar
[Only registered and activated users can see links] moniker_1962.part05.rar
[Only registered and activated users can see links] moniker_1962.part06.rar
[Only registered and activated users can see links] moniker_1962.part07.rar
[Only registered and activated users can see links] moniker_1962.part08.rar
[Only registered and activated users can see links] moniker_1962.part09.rar

guardedfromspam
10-23-2008, 09:14 PM
I'd like to go ahead and make a request. I'd like to hear something from living composers who are part of the general movement called "neo-romantic". Folks like Joan Tower, Michael Torke, Corigliano, Whiticre, that kind of music.

streichorchester
10-25-2008, 12:29 AM
I haven't heard the Mahler or Wagner reorchestrations of Beethoven's 9th or seen the scores. I'll get to it as soon as I have time, but I'm extremely busy right now.

My general principle on reinterpretations or reorchestrations is that they're perfectly acceptable if they work. Obviously, great composers like Mahler and everyone who ever touched Mussorgsky's music thought something was missing (or flat out wrong), and composers are competitive by nature, so why not add those missing parts and show off a little? Of course, it helps that Mahler and Wagner are well respected composers in the first place.

Also, maybe they felt that they ran out of Beethoven, so reimagining his music is just something to keep it fresh. As long as they don't go all Berio on it, I'm for it.

_Marth_
10-26-2008, 12:44 AM
Im kinda a newbie about classical music but i like it and well i have two requests

-One do you have an album of Paganini with the song la Campanella originally composed by Liszt

-Second i would please to knwo if any of your music are linked to an anime , movie , mangas,video games maybe it would interest me

arthierr
10-26-2008, 12:59 AM
-Second i would please to knwo if any of your music are linked to an anime , movie , mangas,video games maybe it would interest me

Which music? And what do you mean by "linked", linked in what way?

1337
10-26-2008, 01:02 AM
Im kinda a newbie about classical music but i like it and well i have two requests

-One do you have an album of Paganini with the song la Campanella originally composed by Liszt

-Second i would please to knwo if any of your music are linked to an anime , movie , mangas,video games maybe it would interest me

La Campanella by Liszt is an etude from a set of 6 etudes based on Paganini's music if you're talking about the etudes by Liszt

here: [Only registered and activated users can see links]
(Which also contains the rest of Liszt's Paganini etudes)

If you are interested in the original composition of La campanella than you're looking for Paganini's second Violin Concerto.


Which music? And what do you mean by "linked", linked in what way?

I think he means: Classical music that has been used in Video games, movies etc...
I'm sure you'll find something from Nodame Cantabile compilations. For movies;
I suggest : [Only registered and activated users can see links] (100 Best Film Classics) mainstream classical pieces everyone has heard thousand and thousands of times lol

arthierr
10-26-2008, 01:18 AM
Oh? Then you can try this :

Princess Tutu Konzerts OSTs 1, 2, 3 - Kaoru Wada and the Sofia Symphonic Orchestra
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

A 513 MB pack! Contains some original music by the wonderful Kaoru Wada and a lot of classical music conducted by him. Highly recommended!

bark
10-29-2008, 02:37 PM
I'd like to request:

Franz Schubert: Gretchen Am Spinnrade
a.k.a "Gretchen and her spinning Wheel"

arthierr
10-30-2008, 08:06 AM
This song is included in this album.

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

01. Der Wanderer An Den Mond D.870.mp3
02. Der Blinde Knabe D.833.mp3
03. Der Einsame D.800.mp3
04. Nacht Und Traüme D.827.mp3
05. Suleika I, D.720.mp3
06. Ganymed D.544.mp3
07. Rastlose Liebe D.138.mp3
08. Wanderers Nachtlied D.768.mp3
09. Die Forelle D.550 (La Truite).mp3
10. Suleika II, D.717.mp3
11. Der Musensohn D.764.mp3
12. Lied Der Mignon D.877.mp3
13. Der König In Thule D.367.mp3
14. Gretchen Am Spinnrade D.118.mp3
15. Du Bist Die Ruh D.776.mp3
16. Im Frühling D.882.mp3

Total Size: 127,13MB

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Tsobanian
11-04-2008, 05:21 AM
Abbado + Mussorgsky = great stuff! You can hear "St. John Night on the Bare Mountain" for Bass-Baritone, Children's Choir, Choir & Orchestra

[Only registered and activated users can see links] n_Scherzo_Int.html






Guys, my ADSL at home has problems and I cannot download torrents. I can access the internet only through a public PC, but unfortunately I cannot download torrents from a public PC.
Thus could someone download this torrent and upload the files on rapidshare please? That would be really great....
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Its Stokowski's Symphonic Bach Vol 1 & 2
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

tangotreats
11-04-2008, 07:43 AM
Sure - no problem. :)
Give me an hour or so.

Tsobanian
11-05-2008, 02:36 AM
Thanks, man! you're really life savour if you do it!



And this one has the original 1867 version of Mussorgsky's "Bald Mountain"
[Only registered and activated users can see links] _Mountain_Cho.html

tangotreats
11-05-2008, 05:51 AM
Gawd, it's 300mb. This is going to take a while to upload - I won't be upset if anybody else has the ability to do it faster; but I will do so, although it could take a few days at my paltry upload speed...

bark
11-05-2008, 08:14 PM
I'd like to request:

Arabesque by Johann August Franz Burgmüller

And for the love of classical, please, please, only this one song/various versions of this song. It's an enormous pain having to dowload a huge file of a bunch of songs I don't need.

Tsobanian
11-06-2008, 03:33 AM
Gawd, it's 300mb. This is going to take a while to upload - I won't be upset if anybody else has the ability to do it faster; but I will do so, although it could take a few days at my paltry upload speed...



The fast thing is not a problem. The problem is that I am with no internet for 3 weeks and I cannot download via torrents on public PCs. So rapidshare, megaupload, sendspace, etc are the only thing that will work in the case.
You need to upload the 2 albums in one rar. Split the thing!

Dice.
11-06-2008, 09:16 AM
I am eagerly looking for Beethoven's Allegretto, 2nd movement (Symphony No.7)

Please if anything on where to get it, I'd greatly appreciate it!

streichorchester
11-06-2008, 01:28 PM
Here ya go champ: [Only registered and activated users can see links]

I was listening to Mussorgsky's Aria of Marfa while uploading this, imagine my surprise when I realized they were in the same key (G# minor!)

Also, I listened to the Mahler reorchestration of Beethoven. I couldn't detect most of the changes, but there was this one neat part where the trombones were blasting a rising figure that was definitely un-Beethoven-like, so it was neat. Also, the violas doubling the basses in the fourth movement was kinda interesting.

edit: that version sucks, here's Bernstein's [Only registered and activated users can see links]

Dice.
11-06-2008, 03:52 PM
Ahh, beautiful...thank you!!

Thacrudd
11-11-2008, 11:28 AM
Please excuse my ignorance on this subject, but I have a request. I am loving these magnificant works you all are taking the time to share but I am looking for something to this effect:

Something with pipe organ, harpsichord and some strings (together) The best way for me to describe it is something "Castlevania-like" I've always appreciated the feel of those instruments long before I got into video game music, especially the pipe organ. If you can either upload something or just point me in the right direction of what to look for I would be most humble. I also like up-beat orchestral works so If you reccomend something that would be wonderful. You almost can't help but wave your arms around like you're conducting while driving down the road listing to these pieces!

streichorchester
11-11-2008, 12:01 PM
Harpsichord and strings, eh? Vampire-like music? Can I interest you in Schnittke's amazing Concerto Grosso? Check out the clips on amazon and let me know. It's his best work, in my opinion.

Also check out the soundtrack to Interview With the Vampire by Elliot Goldenthal. Very melancholic stuff.

Thacrudd
11-11-2008, 01:22 PM
Harpsichord and strings, eh? Vampire-like music? Can I interest you in Schnittke's amazing Concerto Grosso? Check out the clips on amazon and let me know. It's his best work, in my opinion.

Also check out the soundtrack to Interview With the Vampire by Elliot Goldenthal. Very melancholic stuff.

I'm working on getting Interview With the Vampire right now. I did check out the Concerto Grosso and it was very nice but none of the clips I found had any harpsichord in it, mostly just violins. But that's okay, It was good stuff! lol yes, I guess Vampire music best describes it. I just love how it sounds, so powerful and meaningful, you know? Like I say, I'm looking for some vampire like music or grand organ music which I seem to have a bit of trouble find much of. I also like up-beat stuff as well. I've been listing to some of Bach lately and I've been liking that as well. Funny, you couldn't have told me 8 years ago when I was in high school that I'd be listening to this!

Also, I've listend to some Rachmaninoff and I'm diggin it if you have any.

1337
11-12-2008, 12:22 AM
Thacrudd, Your best bet is music of the baroque era, some Bach or Vivaldi will do good for you (I never liked baroque music myself though...). For the Harpsichord, I'd recommend checking out Scarlatti's Sonatas.

I'm assuming by vampire music you mean stuff from Castlevania? lots of Yamane's work on the 3d Castlevanias are close to Bach's music.

EDIT: For Rachmaninov, I recommend listening to his late works, especially the 2nd movement of the Symphonic Dances (Orchestral version), Op. 45. (the piece seems to remind me of an undead waltz)

streichorchester
11-12-2008, 12:58 AM
This is my favourite classical find of the year. It's partly avant-garde, but then it surprises you with melodic development that will get stuck in your head indefinitely. It's written for string orchestra, piano, harpsichord, and what sound like "water bowls" but is just a prepared piano. If you're like me, you'll love the Rondo. Also included in the file is Quasi Una Sonata, Mozart a la Haydn, and A Paganini.

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Tsobanian
11-12-2008, 12:22 PM
Stokowski's orchestral transcriptions FTW!
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]



[Only registered and activated users can see links]
I will upload something afterwards.


Some famous Bach organ works can be found here
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]




or
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Thacrudd
11-13-2008, 10:01 AM
Thank you all for your help, I really appreciate you all pointing me in the right direction. I really enjoy the "haunting" sound for some reason, maybe because I have been fond of the Castlevania series for a long time.

@streichorchester - The Rondo is amazing, really moving stuff!

Tsobanian
11-13-2008, 03:09 PM
[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Luisfer
11-29-2008, 12:05 AM
Hello everyone, I don't know if this is the right thread to ask... but I am a pianist, and I'm looking for the "Music Minus One" cds... they're the accompaniments for the piano concertos for you to play along with them.
If anyone has them... or if you know where I can download them please tell me. I would buy them, but I live in Colombia and I can't find them anywhere.

Thanks a lot

Mithrandir_1977
12-05-2008, 01:12 PM
Thanks everyone for all this great music.

Anybody have a decent version of Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture without canons and Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture?

Doublehex
12-23-2008, 08:31 PM
Here's something I found: Salvation is Created, composed by Pavel Grigorievich Chesnokov, in 1912.

[Only registered and activated users can see links]

Tsobanian
12-24-2008, 03:37 AM
Orchestration for Mozart's Turkish March. The piccolo, the bass drum, the triangle and cymbals bring a truly delightful touch to this legenderay Mozart composition.
Orchestrated by Leopold Stokowski for: 2 piccolos, 2 clarinets, 1 bassoon & contrabassoon, 2 french horns, 2 trumpets, 1 trombone, 1 tuba, triangle, bass drum, cymbals & strings.
[Only registered and activated users can see links]


Sousa/Stokowski "The Stars & Stripes Forever". The brilliance of Stokowski's orchestration, with its use of sleigh-bells and xylophones, saxophones and harps, adds pure dazzle to this most famous of American marches!!!!!
[Only registered and activated users can see links]



Leopold Stokowski's orchestral transcription for the Bach's "Little Fugue" BWV578. Stokowski comments: "Although this fugue is short, it is one of Bach's greatest creations. In its orchestral form it begins with the solo voice of wind instrumends. As each instrument enters, the complex weaving of the counterpoint becomes always richer, and the fugue ends with all the instruments sounding like a triumphant chorus!"
[Only registered and activated users can see links]


The following mp3 contains Fugue No.2 from the "Well-tempered Clavier, Book I" scored for enormous orchestra by Leopold Stokowski. It's short but it so representative for the infamous "Stokowski Sound".
The orchestration is gargantuan: 4 flutes, 2 piccolos, 3 oboes, 1 cor anglais (English Horn), 3 clarinets, 1 bass clarinet, 3 bassoons, 1 contrabassoon, 4 trumpets, 8 french horns, 4 trombones, 1 tuba, electric bass guitar, timpani and strings!
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

streichorchester
12-26-2008, 10:33 PM
Hey, guess what was just released:

[Only registered and activated users can see links]


I think the cover could have been a little less... you know, but finally a way to hear the Requiem? We shall see very soon...

1337
12-26-2008, 10:51 PM
Hahahaha the cover sure is something else... hope we'll be seing this posted here ASAP!! Kabalevsky is so hard to come by and his music is amazing!

Sirusjr
12-26-2008, 11:58 PM
Arthierr, I noticed you said earlier in this thread you are a huge Grieg fan. I recently started searching for Grieg music after i listened to one album and loving it. So far I was able to find Summer Night (Piano and Saxophone), String Quartets Played by Auryn Quartett, and Six Orchestral Songs by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic and the Peer Gynt posted in this thread.

Do you have some other Grieg besides those or any interest in any of the ones I mentioned?

Doublehex
12-27-2008, 09:15 AM
Mahler's Symphony No. 5 in c# minor (that's <strike>7</strike> 4 sharps!)
Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic

[Only registered and activated users can see links]
[Only registered and activated users can see links]

(note: if you're having trouble extracting the first movement because of its absurdly long filename, try extracting it to your root C:\)

This symphony is generally considered to be the most representative of Mahler's style. It's 5 movements (Mahler was fond of breaking traditional symphonic form and adding an extra movement or two) but split into 3 parts:

Part 1

I. Trauermarsche
It all begins with a fanfare for solo trumpet that was foreshadowed in the Symphony No. 4. Mahler was frightened, if not a bit fascinated with death, and loved to begin his symphonies with a march in a minor key representative of a funeral procession. In true sonata-allegro form, the secondary theme appears around 1:20. Notice how Mahler plays with dynamics, switching between f and p for emotional effect. Where the classical symphony calls for a direct repeat of the primary and secondary themes, Mahler returns to the primary and then secondary in variation. Keep in mind that every little bit of instrumental ornamentation is its own motif that is heard throughout the movement in different voices and variations.

6:10 is the beginning of the development section, and though it hints at snippets of the trumpet fanfare, the theme here is new. The fast-moving violins and winds will also play a role in the final movement. At 7:47 there is a climax that marks the return of the primary theme. The secondary theme returns at 8:55, and Bernstein takes this really slow. The trumpet theme is played in the solo timpani at 11:00 marking the end of the development and the beginning of the coda. There is another climax at 12:50 that again leads into the fanfare, and then the end.

II. Sturmisch bewegt (moving "stormingly" or "stormishly")
The opening movement wasn't exactly an allegro, so this is essentially a continuation of the idea of symphonic formality. The falling winds at 1:15 also will play a role in the final movement. At 1:35 a kind of variation plays on the funeral march from the previous movement while the winds play this neat motif figure over and over. It gets somewhat "romantic" like something Rachmaninov would write, but before too long returns to the quick, Wagner-ish action it opened with. At 4:25 a haunting solo for the cellos plays over a quiet timpani roll until 5:50 when the funeral march returns and things get more agitated. Here we can also hear foreshadowing of some ideas that will appear in the Adagietto and Symphony No. 6.

At 8:40 the orchestration begins to sound like John Williams in that the voices are all over the place, and when the funeral march returns take notice of everything else that is going on motivically. Each sound is found earlier in the movement and maybe has to be seen in the score to be appreciated for its complexity. At 11:00 a variation in the solo cello melody is heard with some awesome counterpoint in the trombones. At 12:00 things get very Wagner-ian as it wraps up Part 1 with a brass chorale and fanfare; a very awesome moment. If you didn't know better, you might have thought this was the ending. But those wind runs interject yet again and the agitation persists. There is some more foreshadowing of the 6th, and a familiar motif ends the movement.

Part 2

III. Scherzo
The scherzos are really where Mahler's orchestration shines, as if it hasn't shone enough by now. Here he plays with dance-like melodies in triple-metre, but this movement is like its own self-contained, little symphony complete with allegros, adagios, and a grand finale. Notice a little bit of fugal writing between the top and bottom strings. There is also a little quoting of the "devil's violin" from the 4th symphony's scherzo. 2:40 is the beginning of the secondary theme which takes after the German ländler. Mahler's dance music always gives the impression he could have made it big as an alternative to Johann Strauss, but Mahler instead tells a story with the music which is why it can never seem to settle down. It's always going places, always developing, and any indication of a dance is to establish the rural setting for which the story takes place.

5:05 is the beginning of a new theme (B) that is almost Slovakian in nature since the harmonies are not your typical candential-Germanic. This is the style of Mahler's "Wunderhorn lieder", the songs he wrote before the symphonies about nature, man, and death. 5:45 is the first climax of the scherzo (Mahler's scherzos often have this sort of "moment of resolution" over a pedal.) The horn solo here is tragic and very lovely. At 7:20, the strings imitate a mandolin or some kind of guitar used for folk dances. The interchanging themes almost make you think there are two dances going on at the same time. And what else could 9:20 represent but a harsh German winter? The "lieder" continues on at 10:08 in the horns, and you can almost imagine a baritone singing that line.

10:40 is an interesting return to the quick dance as it becomes more waltz-like than ländler. As things become more agitated there is more motivic development of ideas heard at the beginning of the movement until 11:50 when there is a complete return to the beginning (A') and the dance develops more. At 14:15 all of a sudden we're back in the B section of the scherzo with the lieder singing over some new harmonies. This doesn't last long as the dance takes over once again. The buildup at 15:45 is great and reminiscent of Holst (who actually came later.)

16:00 marks the beginning of a neat effect while the song in the horn tries to play out, but it is interrupted by the dance. If you want to get metaphorical, the dance is moving forward quickly into the new century while the slow song of the wise old man is holding things back as if to warn about the future. 18:11 to the end is quite a rush as Mahler brings back the themes from earlier and resolves them with a fanfare.

Part 3

IV. Adagietto
There isn't much to say about this except it is scored for only strings and harp and is one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever written, and was used in the film Death in Venice. It often draws comparisons with Barber's Adagio for Strings in the use of chromatic harmonies to pull and release. There is some foreshadowing of the adagio in the 6th. If you like this sort of music from Mahler, also check out the final movement from the 3rd, the adagio movement from the 4th, the adagio from the 6th, the adagio finale from the 9th, and the opening movement of the 10th (the last thing Mahler wrote that wasn't just sketches.) Many of the themes in this movement will return for the 5th and final movement.

V. Rondo-Finale
In sharp contrast to the seriousness of what preceded it, this movement starts off very playful in the manner of Mahler's first symphony. Again we hear some "Wunderhorn" lieder and some fugal interplay in the strings. The Symphony No. 5 also marks the end of Mahler's basing his symphonies on the songs he wrote, or what are known as the "Wunderhorn symphonies." As with each of the first 5 of Mahler's symphonies, the light-hearted tone of the final movement represents victory and the celebration of life. It is the 6th that is the bleakest and more representative of death. This movement moves along quite quickly and uninterrupted as it reiterates some ideas from the adagio over the double-bowing cellos. A neat aspect of this is that with each incarnation of the theme, it changes key. It's almost as if Mahler couldn't yet allow things to end, so he'd begin anew in a new key.

At 9:00 things begin to sound as though they're wrapping up as it builds to the final variation of the song. There is even more fugul interplay over a rolling timpani in a kind of extended build up to the end. At 11:10 things are interrupted briefly for some great stringless wind playing. What's great about Mahler is that one minute the entire orchestra is chugging along, then suddenly a wind octet or some other chamber ensemble takes over. It really adds to the "bigness" of the sound by drawing this contrast between formal styles. 13:49 is a glorious brass choral of 1812 Overture proportions. I don't know how he does it, but Mahler always manages to find the best harmonies to end a symphony with (see the ending chorals from the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 7th, and 8th.) At 14:48 the wind runs here heard back in the 2nd movement are a nice touch, and a great way to have the winds do something without being overpowered by the brass.

And that's all there is to it. Many of the best orchestrations of all time within one symphony. You could spend a lifetime analyzing the score, and no one has come close in classical or film music to matching the ingenuity of the motivic development herein.

I have a small bone to pick with you sir. You see, the very first part, it has a filename so long, it is not recognized by Windows! I can't play it in WinAmp, I can't alter its filename - heck, I can't even make a copy of it!

Any hopes of you releasing a version that doesn't have a name the size of the Chinese Wall?

streichorchester
12-27-2008, 09:30 AM
Put the rar in your root C:\ then extract to C:\, it's not that the filename is long, it's that it's too long for the directory which probably resembles C:\documents and settings\blah blah\blah blah\blah blah\etc.

Doublehex
12-27-2008, 01:44 PM
Good Lord, I have already deleted the .rar from my TEMP folder.

T_T

Any hopes of you releasing just that one .mp3?

ShadowSong
12-27-2008, 03:28 PM
i had the opportunity to play timpani for Malcolm Arnold's Peterloo Overture and i fell absolutely in love with the piece, but i don't have a recording of it

i would love to hear it again, does anyone have it?
a link would be greatly appreciated

arthierr
12-28-2008, 10:31 PM
Arthierr, I noticed you said earlier in this thread you are a huge Grieg fan. I recently started searching for Grieg music after i listened to one album and loving it. So far I was able to find Summer Night (Piano and Saxophone), String Quartets Played by Auryn Quartett, and Six Orchestral Songs by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic and the Peer Gynt posted in this thread.

Do you have some other Grieg besides those or any interest in any of the ones I mentioned?

It was a little exaggerated, but I quite appreciate his orchestral compositions. The problem is that there aren't many of them. Other than what you mentioned, the only thing I'm used to is the Piano Concerto (can be easily found as a torrent).

Also if someone could please post his Symphony in C Minor, it would be great because I didn't try it.

streichorchester
12-30-2008, 12:00 AM
I'm in a good mood right now, which rarely happens this time of year, so here's the Mahler file [Only registered and activated users can see links]

Doublehex
12-30-2008, 10:31 AM
I'm in a good mood right now, which rarely happens this time of year, so here's the Mahler file [Only registered and activated users can see links]

Thanks alot. I do appreciate it!

I'll post my thoughts after I listen to the symphony.

Sirusjr
12-30-2008, 12:18 PM
I found a couple Strauss albums that I loved and now I've been listening to a ton of Richard Strauss music. Who else has a similar style so Strauss? (most specifically the use of horns and percussion).

Kreachure
01-05-2009, 06:38 PM
O hai! It's me, the "pop classical" guy! :rolleyes: I've been busy expanding and polishing my popular classical music collection, and it turns out it became a whole lot bigger than I expected (over 450 megs :shock: ). So, uploading's not as easy as I imagined, and I would like to know that people will indeed appreciate my efforts. So I want to share the resulting playlist, and I'd like to hear any opinions about what you think of my collection.

As I mentioned a long time ago, all these songs I personally hand-picked because they're popular, in other words there's a 90% chance you will recognize all of these songs from a movie, TV ads, cartoons, and other places. So here it is: (I hope it's not too annoying if I post the list in regular size...)

1. Antonio Vivaldi - Concerto 'L'estate', RV 315 - III: Presto (2:48)
2. Bach - Air on strings in G (3:13)
3. Bach - Orchestral Suite No. 2 In B Minor (Badinerie) (1:26)
4. Bach - Toccata E Fuga (BWV 565) (9:21)
5. Bach - Minuet In G Major (1:35)
6. Bach - Jesus Bleibet Meine Freude (BWV 147) (3:49)
7. Beethoven - Fur Elise (3:10)
8. Beethoven - Ode to Joy (4:34)
9. Beethoven - Symphony No. 5 (2:54)
10. Beethoven - Moonlight Sonata (5:59)
11. Beethoven - Symphony No. 6 (Pastoral) Op. 68: I Allegro Ma Non Troppo (4:39)
12. Bizet - Carmen Suite No.2 (Habanera) (2:12)
13. Boccherini - Minuet (3:58)
14. Brahms - Hungarian Dance No.5 in G Minor (2:25)
15. Brahms - Lullaby (2:54)
16. Carl Orff - Carmina Burana - O Fortuna (5:19)
17. Chopin - Claire de Lune (4:47)
18. Chopin - Minute Waltz (1:52)
19. Clarke - Trumpet Voluntary (2:13)
20. Samuel Osborne Barber - Adagio For Strings (7:54)
21. Copland - Fanfare For The Common Man (3:12)
22. Copland - Hoedown (3:17)
23. Delibes - Lakmé - Duo Des Fleurs (5:05)
24. Delibes - Pizzicato (2:37)
25. Dvorak - Humoresque (3:23)
26. Elgar - Pomp And Circumstance March (4:35)
27. George Gershwin - Rhapsody In Blue (Jazzband Version - Opening) (4:38)
28. Georges Bizet - L'amour Est Un Oiseau Rebelle (Habanera) (Carmen, Act I) (4:20)
29. Georges Bizet - Prelude (Carmen) (2:15)
30. Giacomo Puccini - O Mio Babbino Caro (Gianni Schicchi) (2:05)
31. Giacomo Puccini - Un Bel Di Vedremo (Madama *********) (5:21)
32. Gioachino Rossini - Largo Al Factotum (Il Barbiere Di Siviglia) (4:19)
33. Giuseppe Verdi - Libiamo Ne'lieti Calici (Brindisi) (La Traviata) (2:53)
34. Grieg - In The Hall Of The Mountain King (2:53)
35. Grieg - Peer Gynt Suite No. 1 (Op. 46) - Morgenstemning (4:00)
36. Gustav Holst, Levine - Jupiter, The Bringer of Jollity (7:35)
37. Händel - Messiah (HWV 56) - Hallelujah (4:21)
38. Handel - Suite No 2 (2:56)
39. Johann Strauss II And Josef Strauss - Pizzicato-Polka (2:32)
40. Joplin - Entertainer (4:08)
41. Khachaturian - Sabre Dance (2:29)
42. Liszt - Hungarian Rhapsody No.2 (10:20)
43. Mendelssohn- - Midsummer Nights Dream Op 21 (Wedding March) (2:20)
44. Mendelssohn - Spring Song (2:46)
45. Mouret - Rondeau (1:54)
46. Mouskouri - Zorba's Dance (3:39)
47. Mozart - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik K525 (4:13)
48. Mozart - Green Sleeves (2:24)
49. Mozart - Je, Maman (4:35)
50. Mozart - Overture To The Marriage Of Figaro (4:15)
51. Mozart - Piano Concerto No.21 in C, (II. Andante) (2:48)
52. Mozart - Piano Sonata No11 (3:25)
53. Mozart - Piano Sonata No16 (9:14)
54. Mozart - Symphony No40 (7:37)
55. Mussorgsky Night on Bald Mountain (14:47)
56. Offenbach - Orpheus In The Underworld (2:13)
57. Pachelbel - Canon in D (4:44)
58. Percy Grainger - Country Gardens (2:03)
59. Ponchielli - Dance Of The Hours (9:32)
60. Prokofiev - Peter And The Wolf (1:47)
61. Prokofiev - Romeo And Juliet Suite No. 2 (Op. 64b) (5:20)
62. Richard Strauss - Also Sprach Zarathustra (1:46)
63. Rosas - Sobre Las Olas (3:40)
64. Rossini - La Gazza Ladra Overture (10:14)
65. Rossini - Overture - The Barber of Seville (3:45)
66. Rossini - William Tell Overture Begin (13:17)
67. Rossini - William Tell Overture End (3:31)
68. Rymsky, Korsakov - Flight of the Bumble Bee (1:35)
69. Saint-Saens - The Aquarium (2:06)
70. Sousa - Stars And Stripes Forever (3:30)
71. Sousa - Washington Post March (2:35)
72. Strauss - Overture Die Fledermaus (3:53)
73. Strauss - Radetzky (4:11)
74. Strauss - Thunder and Lightening Polka (3:19)
75. Strauss - Tritsch-Tratsch Polka (2:43)
76. Suppe - Light Cavalry - Overture (6:47)
77. Suppe - Poet and Peasant - Overture (9:56)
78. Tchaikovsky - 1812 - Festival Overture Op. 49 (6:02)
79. Tchaikovsky - Romeo And Juliet (2:06)
80. Tchaikovsky - Sleeping Beauty Op. 66, (The Waltz) (2:43)
81. Tchaikovsky - Swan Lake (Dance of the Swans) (1:50)
82. Tchaikovsky - The Nutcracker - Dance of the Reed Pipes (2:13)
83. Tchaikovsky - The Nutcracker - Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy (2:05)
84. Tchaikovsky - The Nutcracker - Pas de deux, Intrada (5:00)
85. Tchaikovsky - The Nutcracker - Tea (Chinese Dance) (1:07)
86. Tchaikovsky - The Nutcracker - Trépak (Russian Dance) (1:00)
87. Tchaikovsky - The Nutcracker - Waltz of the Flowers (6:23)
88. Vangelis - Main Theme From "Chariots Of Fire" :-[ (3:31)
89. Verdi - Anvil Chorus (2:45)
90. Verdi - Dies Irae (2:35)
91. Verdi - Rigoletto - La Donna é Mobile (2:22)
92. Vivaldi - Autumn (11:11)
93. Vivaldi - Spring (11:07)
94. Vivaldi - Summer (10:27)
95. Vivaldi - Winter (5:34)
96. Waldenteufel - The Skaters Waltz (5:41)
97. Classical - Wagner - Ride of the Valkyries (10:00)

So what do you think???

guardedfromspam
01-05-2009, 07:59 PM
O
So what do you think???


Nice list, but for pieces in which most of the movements are listed, it might be better just to list the entire work.

Also, the "clair de lune" everybody knows is by Debussy, not Chopin.

streichorchester
01-05-2009, 11:13 PM
Here are a few popular selections missing from your list that might interest you (you can find any of them on youtube):

Beethoven - Piano Sonata No. 6
Borodin - Polovetsian Dances
Debussy - Reverie
Dvorak - Symphony No. 9 (any movement)
Elgar - Enigma Variations
Faure - Pavane
Faure - Pelleas et Melisande - Sicilienne (orchestral version)
Grieg - Piano Concerto in A minor
Kabalevsky - The Comedians - Galopp
Prokofiev - March from Love for Three Oranges
Rachmaninov - Piano Concerto No. 2
Rachmaninov - Prelude in C# minor
Ravel - Pavane for a Dead Princess
Schubert - Symphony No. 8
Schuman - Piano Concerto in A minor
Shostakovich - Jazz Suite No. 2
Vaughan Williams - Fantasia on Greensleeves

web01
01-08-2009, 11:09 PM
great stuff